Home 

 3440 "CITY OF TRURO LEAVES TODDINGTON
15 APRIL 2009
 
 

 

   
   37 324 "Clydesbridge" and 7903 "Foremarke Hall"" at Toddington on 15 April 2009  
 

 

  
37 324 "Clydesbridge" and 7903 "Foremarke Hall"" at Toddington on 15 April 2009


 
Whilst visiting the Toddington headquarters of the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway on Wednesday 15 April 2009 to make a donation to the second hand stall in the parcels van museum I was also fortunate enough not only to see 37 324 "Clydesbridge" and 7903 "Foremarke Hall" but also the preparations for the departure of railway legend 3440 "City of Truro" for a new season of service on the Llangollen Railway in north Wales.


 
3440 "City of Truro" awaits the arrival of the low loader to take the railway icon to Llangollen


 
As well as taking the opportunity to re-acquaint myself with the number, name and worksplate,  the separation of the Great Western Railway 4-4-0 from its tender allowed some uncommon views of the footplate. Particularly noticeable were the now-mandatory overhead electrification warning sign on the underside of the cab roof and the painted data on the left hand side.  As well as the TOPS identity of 98240 alongside the more familiar 3440, the 2000th locomotive to be outshopped from Swindon Works is also now limited to 60 mph or 35 mph running tender first - a far cry from  9 May 1904 when the then 13 month old  "City" class locomotive became, according to Charles Rous-Marten of The Railway Magazine, the first wheeled vehicle to exceed 100 mph.


 
As well as taking the opportunity to re-acquaint myself with the number, name and worksplate,  the separation of the Great Western Railway 4-4-0 from its tender allowed some uncommon views of the footplate. Particularly noticeable were the now-mandatory overhead electrification warning sign on the underside of the cab roof and the painted data on the left hand side.  As well as the TOPS identity of 98240 alongside the more familiar 3440, the 2000th locomotive to be outshopped from Swindon Works is also now limited to 60 mph or 35 mph running tender first - a far cry from  9 May 1904 when the then 13 month old  "City" class locomotive became, according to Charles Rous-Marten of The Railway Magazine, the first wheeled vehicle to exceed 100 mph.


 
As well as taking the opportunity to re-acquaint myself with the number, name and worksplate,  the separation of the Great Western Railway 4-4-0 from its tender allowed some uncommon views of the footplate. Particularly noticeable were the now-mandatory overhead electrification warning sign on the underside of the cab roof and the painted data on the left hand side.  As well as the TOPS identity of 98240 alongside the more familiar 3440, the 2000th locomotive to be outshopped from Swindon Works is also now limited to 60 mph or 35 mph running tender first - a far cry from  9 May 1904 when the then 13 month old  "City" class locomotive became, according to Charles Rous-Marten of The Railway Magazine, the first wheeled vehicle to exceed 100 mph.


 
As well as taking the opportunity to re-acquaint myself with the number, name and worksplate,  the separation of the Great Western Railway 4-4-0 from its tender allowed some uncommon views of the footplate. Particularly noticeable were the now-mandatory overhead electrification warning sign on the underside of the cab roof and the painted data on the left hand side.  As well as the TOPS identity of 98240 alongside the more familiar 3440, the 2000th locomotive to be outshopped from Swindon Works is also now limited to 60 mph or 35 mph running tender first - a far cry from  9 May 1904 when the then 13 month old  "City" class locomotive became, according to Charles Rous-Marten of The Railway Magazine, the first wheeled vehicle to exceed 100 mph.

However, Rous-Marten's timing of 102.3 mph - achieved when 3440 was hauling an Ocean Mails special train from Plymouth to London Paddington through Somerset - was not published by The Railway Magazine until 1907.

Initially, mindful of the need to preserve their reputation for safety, the Great Western Railway allowed only the overall timings for the run to be put into print. For the record to have been proven conclusively, the presence of two separate timekeepers was needed although, the milepost timings provided by Rous-Marten are consistent with a speed of 100 mph or just over.

The 100 mph speed barrier was officially broken until 30 November 1934 by LNER Gresley pacific 4472 "Flying Scotsman" but such was the historical significance of City of Truro that after withdrawal from Great Western service- with the number 3717 from 1912 -  in 1931 it was purchased by the London & North Eastern Railway and preserved in their railway museum in York.

Renumbered as 3440, City of Truro was returned to service by British Railways Western Region from 1957 to 1961 after which it spent the years 1962-1984 at Swindon Railway Museum.  Since returning to steam in time for the Great Western Railway 150th Anniversary celebrations in 1985, 3440 has been a regular attraction at York's National Railway Museum as well as on main line excursions, preserved railways and even festivals abroad.
 

 

  
 

With the tower block HQ of Nederland Spoorwegen visible in the background above, 3440 "City of Truro" was buffered up to the industrial 0-4-0T known as "Kikker" ( Frog, in English ), the sole surviving 100% Dutch steam locomotive despite looking very British!

 
 

 

  
  In these pictures courtesy of Michael A. Morant for example, 3440 "City of Truro" is seen during her sojourn to celebrate 150 years of Dutch Railways in 1989.  Arriving at Europoort on 13 June, 3440 arrived at a temporary steam stabling point at Utrecht by low loader before taking part in both the NS150 Royal Opening and locomotive parades on six days of each week.  She was last in steam on Dutch rails on 15 July and returned to Britain as she had come on 17 July.

Also featured in the event was a Swiss 2-10-0 and 27000 "Electra", one of seven LNER designed British Class EM2 dc Co-Cos sold to Nederland Spoorwegen in 1969 after use on the Woodhead route between Manchester and Sheffield.

With the tower block HQ of Nederland Spoorwegen visible in the background above, 3440 "City of Truro" was buffered up to the industrial 0-4-0T known as "Kikker" ( Frog, in English ), the sole surviving 100% Dutch steam locomotive despite looking very British!

In the background below meanwhile were SNCF steam locomotive141R and a TGV set while Spring 1991 saw 3440 "City of Truro" back in Britain and sharing a two carriage train with 6201 "Princess Elizabeth" at the soon-to-be-closed Bulmer's Steam Centre, Hereford.

 
 

 

  
 

In the background below meanwhile were SNCF steam locomotive141R and a TGV set while Spring 1991 saw 3440 "City of Truro" back in Britain and sharing a two carriage train with 6201 "Princess Elizabeth" at the soon-to-be-closed Bulmer's Steam Centre, Hereford.

 
 

 

  
 

In the background below meanwhile were SNCF steam locomotive141R and a TGV set while Spring 1991 saw 3440 "City of Truro" back in Britain and sharing a two carriage train with 6201 "Princess Elizabeth" at the soon-to-be-closed Bulmer's Steam Centre, Hereford.

 
 

 

  
   Its latest restoration to full working order was undertaken in 2004, at a cost of 130,000, to mark the 100th anniversary of its record-breaking run and after its time at Llangollen 3440 - renumbered to its post 1912 identity as 3717 - was back in Gloucestershire on the Dean Forest Railway in 2010. 
 

 

  
 

 

 
 

 

  


 
As well as taking the opportunity to re-acquaint myself with the number, name and worksplate,  the separation of the Great Western Railway 4-4-0 from its tender allowed some uncommon views of the footplate. Particularly noticeable were the now-mandatory overhead electrification warning sign on the underside of the cab roof and the painted data on the left hand side.  As well as the TOPS identity of 98240 alongside the more familiar 3440, the 2000th locomotive to be outshopped from Swindon Works is also now limited to 60 mph or 35 mph running tender first - a far cry from  9 May 1904 when the then 13 month old  "City" class locomotive became, according to Charles Rous-Marten of The Railway Magazine, the first wheeled vehicle to exceed 100 mph.


 
As well as taking the opportunity to re-acquaint myself with the number, name and worksplate,  the separation of the Great Western Railway 4-4-0 from its tender allowed some uncommon views of the footplate. Particularly noticeable were the now-mandatory overhead electrification warning sign on the underside of the cab roof and the painted data on the left hand side.  As well as the TOPS identity of 98240 alongside the more familiar 3440, the 2000th locomotive to be outshopped from Swindon Works is also now limited to 60 mph or 35 mph running tender first - a far cry from  9 May 1904 when the then 13 month old  "City" class locomotive became, according to Charles Rous-Marten of The Railway Magazine, the first wheeled vehicle to exceed 100 mph.


 
Legend or not, moving a large railway locomotive by road is a major undertaking that involves both careful driving along a planned route and an exacting process of loading and unloading.  At Toddington on Wednesday 15 April 2009 a winch powered by an internal combustion engine was being used to slowly haul City of Truro's tender slowly up a railed ramp and aboard a three axle low loader.


 
Legend or not, moving a large railway locomotive by road is a major undertaking that involves both careful driving along a planned route and an exacting process of loading and unloading.  At Toddington on Wednesday 15 April 2009 a winch powered by an internal combustion engine was being used to slowly haul City of Truro's tender slowly up a railed ramp and aboard a three axle low loader.


 
Legend or not, moving a large railway locomotive by road is a major undertaking that involves both careful driving along a planned route and an exacting process of loading and unloading.  At Toddington on Wednesday 15 April 2009 a winch powered by an internal combustion engine was being used to slowly haul City of Truro's tender slowly up a railed ramp and aboard a three axle low loader.


 
Legend or not, moving a large railway locomotive by road is a major undertaking that involves both careful driving along a planned route and an exacting process of loading and unloading.  At Toddington on Wednesday 15 April 2009 a winch powered by an internal combustion engine was being used to slowly haul City of Truro's tender slowly up a railed ramp and aboard a three axle low loader.


 
Ready to haul the trailer loaded with City of Truro's tender to Llangollen was this Volvo FH12 tractor - named "Mountain Countryman" - from the fleet of Lawson's Haulage Ltd of Cockermouth, Cumbria.


 
Ready to haul the trailer loaded with City of Truro's tender to Llangollen was this Volvo FH12 tractor - named "Mountain Countryman" - from the fleet of Lawson's Haulage Ltd of Cockermouth, Cumbria.


 
Ready to haul the trailer loaded with City of Truro's tender to Llangollen was this Volvo FH12 tractor - named "Mountain Countryman" - from the fleet of Lawson's Haulage Ltd of Cockermouth, Cumbria.


 
Ready to haul the trailer loaded with City of Truro's tender to Llangollen was this Volvo FH12 tractor - named "Mountain Countryman" - from the fleet of Lawson's Haulage Ltd of Cockermouth, Cumbria.


 
Ready to haul the trailer loaded with City of Truro's tender to Llangollen was this Volvo FH12 tractor - named "Mountain Countryman" - from the fleet of Lawson's Haulage Ltd of Cockermouth, Cumbria.