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CHELTENHAM GWR MODELLERS GROUP

MODEL RAILWAY EXHIBITION

SATURDAY 28 OCTOBER AND SUNDAY 29 OCTOBER 2006

 
 

   
  THE NEXT EXHIBITION WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY 25 AND SUNDAY 26 OCTOBER 2014
 
 

   
 

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LAYOUT AND ATTRACTION REVIEW

 


 

IN MEMORIAM

ROD PICKERING 1945 - 2006

Since the exhibition in April 2006 we are very sorry to hear of the sudden death of our friend Ron Pickering. A long standing member of Gloucester Model Railway Club and a pillar of the model railway scene in Cheltenham, Rod was always ready to lend a hand at any time during the shows. Even when the exhibitions closed he would be there doing whatever he could to help. Rod will be greatly missed by all that knew and loved him.

 
 

   
  GLADSTONE ROAD by Bentley Model Railway Group. 4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
 

Stop twisting your melons, man! The Happy Mondays and Factory Record's other Twenty Four Hour Party People may be out of sight but this joyful division of Gladstone Road has A Certain Ratio to it!

 
 

   
  Stop twisting your melons, man! The Happy Mondays and Factory Record's other Twenty Four Hour Party People may be out of sight but this joyful division of Gladstone Road has A Certain Ratio to it!  
 

   
  Gladstone Road depicted a suburban commuter station around Manchester circa 1990. It incorporated a mail order catalogue warehouse, DMU servicing siding and engine siding servicing a depot for the overhead electrification project. More details are available from the club website at www.bentleymgr.org.uk  
 

   
  DUNKTON COMBE by Bob Brown. 3mm Scale TT Gauge  
 

   
 

"The New Order I'd like to give the railways is to run more frequently. What time do you make it now?"

 
 

   
 

"The New Order I'd like to give the railways is to run more frequently. What time do you make it now?"

 
 

   
  Anybody familiar with the classic Ealing Studios comedy film "The Titfield Thunderbolt" cannot fail to be captivated by the beautiful scenery along the Cam valley near Bath. Combine this with the branch line to Camerton and beyond and you have the inspiration to this layout. Dunkton Combe was put together from elements of stations along the line with the station building coming from Monkton Combe. The road bridge was a slightly elongated version of the one that stood at Dunkerton Colliery halt.

The track used on the layout was flexi- track produced by the 3mm Society and handbuilt pointwork from 3SMR. Locomotives and rolling stock are all built from kits with a few scratch built items as well. The 3mm Society caters for all standards of 3mm scale modelling from users of the old Triang TT equipment to state of the art finescale.

For the culturally deprived among you, "The Titfield Thunderbolt" was directed in 1952 by Charles Crichton and starred Stanley Holloway, George Relph and Sidney James in the story of villagers who take over their threatened branch line, with hilarious results!

Sid James was the great male laugh (opposite Barbara Windsor) in the later Carry On films but Michael Truman had already produced - and Charles Crichton already directed - Holloway and James in the 1951 monochrome gangster comedy "The Lavender Hill Mob". The reunion of these film makers however was for a Technicolor tribute to the age of steam and the nascent preservation movement. Apparently the scene where all the passengers run to get water for the overheating engine was based on a real event on the Talyllyn Railway!

The film was largely shot on the already disused GWR branch at Camerton near Bath - with Titfield itself played by Monkton Coombe. Writer T.E.B. Clarke got the name Titfield by combining two neighbouring villages near his Surrey home, Titsey and Limpsfield, and the driver, fireman and guard were also real British Railways workers – given speaking rather than background parts after they impressed the director.

The mainline station in the finale is recognisably Bristol Temple Meads and the Titfield Thunderbolt itself was played by Liverpool & Manchester engine "Lion", although Gloucester Horton Road based 0-4-2T 1401 also appeared. In fact the runaway locomotive chase sequence (made with a loco outline on a lorry chassis) also had its roots in a 1935 incident when a GWR tender loco overcame its brakes and demolished a wall in Great Western Road! Click on picture of Dunkton Combe for more details.

 
 

   
  BILLBROOK by Joshua Hall. 4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
 

It is milking time for a herd of Fresian cows in the rolling Cotswold hills near Billbrook station as Great Western Railway diesel railcar 18 accelerates toward its Gloucester birthplace.

 
 

   
  It is milking time for a herd of Fresian cows in the rolling Cotswold hills near Billbrook station as Great Western Railway diesel railcar 18 accelerates toward its Gloucester birthplace. Click on picture for more about GWR diesel railcars built by the Gloucester Railway Carriage & Wagon Company Limited  
 

   
  Billbrook was primarily constructed to fit into Josh's bedroom but portable enough to take to exhibitions and his Grandfather - who helped him build it - imagined a small GWR / BR Western Region terminus somewhere around Stratford Upon Avon. The layout was based on Great Western Railway practice in the late 1940s to early 1950s with Swindon built rolling stock supplemented by trains from other regions - including the odd diesel. Locomotives were mainly ready to run or kit built, most of the building were from the Hornby Skaledale range while working signals were by Ratio or MSE.  
 

   
  THOMAS by CHELTENHAM GWR MODELLERS GROUP.4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
  BERKELEY ROAD DEPOT by Paul Brown & Quedgeley M R Group. 7mm Scale 0 Gauge  
 

   
 

A Pressed Steel "bubblecar" unit rests behind North British built Class 22 diesel hydraulic B-B D6350

 
 

   
  A Pressed Steel "bubblecar" unit rests behind North British built Class 22 diesel hydraulic B-B D6350  
 

   
 

Looking a little down at heel between the modern retail-type red shed and the void of the traverser pit behind it, British Standard 8P Pacific 71000 "Duke of Gloucester" shows off its Caprotti poppet valve gear while coupled to an LMS type Stove R passenger brake van.

 
 

   
  Looking a little down at heel between the modern retail-type red shed and the void of the traverser pit behind it, British Standard 8P Pacific 71000 "Duke of Gloucester" shows off its Caprotti poppet valve gear while coupled to an LMS type Stove R passenger brake van.  
 

   
  Berkeley Road Depot was set sometime between the late 1960s and early 1970s in a fictional location somewhere between Gloucester and Bristol. The layout - featuring both steam and diesel motive power - was originally built by Trevor Hale using Peco track and handbuilt points. All the buildings were scratchbuilt and this was the last time that Berkeley Road Depot was due to be exhibited in its present form. An improved version is eagerly awaited on the exhibition circuit in 2007!  
 

   
  NETTLECOMBE by John and Jane Jacobs. 4mm Scale 009 Gauge  
 

   
 

A Nettlecombe Light Railway bogie carriage has just arrived at Nettlecombe behind one of the company's blue side tank locomotives ready for Third Class passengers to step on board.

 
 

   
  A Nettlecombe Light Railway bogie carriage has just arrived at Nettlecombe behind one of the company's blue side tank locomotives ready for Third Class passengers to step on board.  
 

   
  A horse drawn delivery at Nettlecombe's popular thatched Bell Inn, just in front of the narrow gauge railway  
 

   
  A horse drawn delivery at Nettlecombe's popular thatched Bell Inn, just in front of the narrow gauge railway  
 

   
  Nettlecombe represented a charming village set somewhere in the South West of England fortunate to be served by a 10 mile narrow gauge railway connecting it to the nearest mainline station via the scenic Quarry Hill station. On a lovely summer Saturday in the early 1930s the Nettle Tea Rooms and Bell Inn were busy as a newly married couple posed for wedding pictures outside St Cuthberts Church, next to a lucky chimney sweep, before leaving in a horse drawn carriage.

Jane created the buildings ( all based on real structures ) and the acrylic painted backscene while John built the scenery. The 009 format track and pointwork ( representing a 2'3" gauge in 4mm scale ) is handmade with kit built rolling stock and motive power.

 
 

   
  HOOKWOOD by Jim Bryant. 4mm Scale EM Gauge  
 

   
 

Class 73 electro-diesel E6005 waits for the semaphore start signal to be raised to begin its journey to Westerham now that the Oxted bound 2BIL unit has arrived at Hookwood. Ample freight traffic fills the sidings at the station.

 
 

   
  Class 73 electro-diesel E6005 waits for the semaphore start signal to be raised to begin its journey to Westerham now that the Oxted bound 2BIL unit has arrived at Hookwood. Ample freight traffic fills the sidings at the station.  
 

   
  When the South Eastern Railway reached the small village of Westerham in July1881 it was assumed by the local populace that it was only a matter of time before the branch line from Dunton Green ( on the London Victoria - Sevenoaks - Tonbridge main line ) via Brasted would be extended south west for four miles to Oxted on the London Victoria -Croydon - Newhaven main line. In fact this never happened due to the huge cost of extensive engineering works required but Hookwood imagined that the line had been built as a secondary route from London to the Channel Ports. Hookwood station itself would have been located about a mile north east of Oxted and the layout depicted the scene in the mid1960s with station and goods shed buildings based on those at Westerham and BR Southern Region third rail electrification.

The locomotives were mainly modified ready-to-run examples using Ultrascale EM wheels and A1 detailing kits. The 2BIL ( 2 cars, Both Including Lavatories ) EMU was an Ian Kirk kit with Branch Lines motor/gearbox and extra detailing. Wagons were mostly super-detailed kis and EM Society wheels. Spratt & Winkle couplings are used with strategically placed electromagnets for uncoupling. Hookwood also features working semaphore signals.

 
 

   
  BISHOPSMEAD by Ted Olney. 4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
  A chocolate and cream clerestory carriage represents the Great Western Railway in an otherwise LMS scene at Bishopsmead while 1927 designed Fowler 2-6-4T 2387 arrives with a passenger working.  
 

   
  A chocolate and cream clerestory carriage represents the Great Western Railway in an otherwise LMS scene at Bishopsmead while 1927 designed Fowler 2-6-4T 2387 arrives with a passenger working.  
 

   
  Bishopsmead represented a busy station located somewhere on the Western / Central division of the LMS in the mid 1930s. In effect it was a terminus both for the main part of the branch from the main line at the fictitious Castlebury Junction and also for the trailing sub-branch to Smallcombe. Thus all trains between Castlebury and Smallcombe had to reverse at Bishopsmead - including some Great Western interlopers! Castlebury and Smallcombe were represented by fiddle yards and all buildings and rolling stock were either kit, modified kit or scratch built.  
 

   
  DOVINGTON CAMP by Paul Taylor, Nailsea & District MRC. 4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
 

Just beyond the chain link fencing and barbed wire from the camp fuel depot, an Alvis built FV601 Saladin six wheeled armoured fighting vehicle of the 1960s waits on a Lowmac wagon for a movement order.

 
 

   
  Just beyond the chain link fencing and barbed wire from the camp fuel depot, an Alvis built FV601 Saladin six wheeled armoured fighting vehicle of the 1960s waits on a Lowmac wagon for a movement order.  
 

   
  Dovington Camp was developed during World War II as an army stores and training depot with quite an extensive rail network. This had been rationalised over time but still retained a rail link for the movement of fuel, stores, munitions and a wide variety of military vehicles. It retained an old WD / MOD diesel locomotive or two for shunting within the depot. The main stores and office were constructed with the exteriors visible to exhibition visitors and it was possible to change these to represent different periods from the 1960s to the 1990s - along with with the appropriate rail and military vehicles and signage. Dovington was seen at Cheltenham in its smallest modular form and in its 1960s guise could also connect with Paul Taylor's Whitchurch Canonicorum layout.  
 

   
 

Armoured fighting vehicles also ply the tracks between Cheltenham and Gloucester just a rifle shot from St Margaret's Hall. Here, EWS liveried 66 118 hurries a rake of part desert camouflaged Warrior personnel carriers north past Barnwood and Churchdown in September 2004.

 
 

   
 

Armoured fighting vehicles also ply the tracks between Cheltenham and Gloucester just a rifle shot from St Margaret's Hall. Here, EWS liveried 66 118 hurries a rake of part desert camouflaged Warrior personnel carriers north past Barnwood and Churchdown in September 2004.

 
 

   
  Armoured fighting vehicles also ply the tracks between Cheltenham and Gloucester just a rifle shot from St Margaret's Hall. Here, EWS liveried 66 118 hurries a rake of part desert camouflaged Warrior personnel carriers north past Barnwood and Churchdown in September 2004.  
 

   
  STRACHAN by Les Williams. 4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
 

You can always tell a Les Williams layout from the attention to detail and the superb weathering. I was also pleased to see 24 081 again in model form, having driven the real thing on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway.

 
 

   
  You can always tell a Les Williams layout from the attention to detail and the superb weathering. I was also pleased to see 24 081 again in model form, having driven the real thing on the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway. Click on picture for more details  
 

   
  Strachan represented a typical yet fictitious Scottish terminus north of Glasgow in the British Rail blue period of the 1975-77. In fact there really is a village named Strachan ( not rail served ) and the name was chosen to be typically Scottish yet memorable to Sassenachs who might recall Gordon Strachan managing Coventry City FC or Michaela Strachan from Disney Club and many other TV programmes.

Strachan was built for Les Williams by Kelvin Barnes and was set to a maximum size of 11' x 2'6", being split into two chipboard covered sections for transportation. Also boasting a small locomotive stabling point ( supplied with fuel by rail ) and goods yard (handling coal and grain ), Strachan featured Townstreet stonecast range buildings, Woodland Scenics and Heki trees, Peco Streamline Electrofrog Code 100 track ( realistically weathered and to medium radius standard ), EFE and Springside road vehicles and Dapol figures.

Detailed and weathered rolling stock was by Lima, Bachmann and Hornby and diesel classes included 06, 08,20.24,25,26,27,37,40, 47,55 and the occasional DMU.

Indeed, while Strachan has enough track for all necessary train movements, enough space was reserved for realistic and interesting landscaping, including a pond, gardens, ruined cottage and stone circle on the public viewing side.

 
 

   
  BARTON HILL by Don Dickson,Nailsea & District MRC. 2mm Scale N Gauge  
 

   
 

With the elevated road to the end of the M32 on the bridge in the background, a Propelling Control Vehicle rests alongside other RES and Royal Mail liveried stock at Barton Hill

 
 

   
  With the elevated road to the end of the M32 on the bridge in the background, a Propelling Control Vehicle rests alongside other RES and Royal Mail liveried stock at Barton Hill  
 

   
 

If you think that the view goes on for miles think again! Barton Hill features a very convincing scenic trompe d'oeil

 
 

   
  If you think that the view goes on for miles think again! Barton Hill features a very convincing scenic trompe d'oeil  
 

   
  Until recently, if you were travelling either North or East from Bristol Temple Meads and looked out of the carriage window you would have seen the English, Welsh and Scottish Railways Depot at Barton Hill. This is now hidden by more recent buildings, but just a few years ago it was a Rail Express Services Depot hosting a range of red liveried postal rolling stock. The baseboard was made of plywood with PECO track ( with PECO electrics ) laid on a cork base and the DG couplers on the rolling stock could be worked with in-track electromagnets.  
 

   
  MODEL BUS FEDERATION by Paul Mellor
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT MODELLERS by David Mellor
4mm Scale
 
 

   
 

North Western ( Gloucester ) liveried single deck WY51 BAD eases in to Brocklecote Bus Station past a Europcar white van. The model is based on a Corgi original Omnibus Company product modified to represent a Wright Endurance body on a Volvo B10M chassis.

 
 

   
  North Western ( Gloucester ) liveried single deck WY51 BAD eases in to Brocklecote Bus Station past a Europcar white van. The model is based on a Corgi original Omnibus Company product modified to represent a Wright Endurance body on a Volvo B10M chassis. Click on picture for the Mellor Brothers own pages.  
 

   
 

The appearance of this fine Eric Vick rig at the Riverside Transport Cafe was not to be sniffed at either!

 
 
   
  The appearance of this fine Eric Vick rig arriving at the River View Transport Cafe was not to be sniffed at either!  
 
   
  The Mellor Brothers were back in effect at St Margaret's Hall with new completed vehicles and works in progress. Also joining them on Sunday 29 October was fellow bus modeller and Model Bus Federation member Andy Peckham. His depot diorama was centered around a fictitious firm with a brown and cream livery and included a 1986 vintage PSV with a scratchbuilt Volvo B10 chassis and Berkhof body. It is hoped to feature more of this splendid fleet in future presentations, but some readers will be asking why a skilled modeller should be striving to perfect fictitious markings when most railway and aircraft builders go into rivet-counting detail trying to replicate reality. The answer, as Paul Mellor explained, is that bus modelling also has a function beyond shape and colour recognition that is more akin to wargaming. As further reported on the Model Bus Federation website and in their regular printed Supplements, some bus enthusiasts will use their scale replicas as the basis for hypothetical bus companies. These will bid for and operate routes and be allocated their own blocks of route numbers by Traffic Commissioners. Single deck WY51 BAD seen above, for example, carries the route number 545 which plies between Brocklecote and Nailsworth via Gloucester City and operates to a timetable interlocking with other operators. Such operators also cope with changing conditions inspired by events in the real world.  
 

   
  BUS DIORAMA AND COACH STATION by Pat Harris  
 

   
 

Pat Harris made up a hat trick of bus dioramas on the Sunday of the show, and peeking out of the garage between the repair ramp and the coach wash are half cab AEC double decker ORR 140 in West Bromwich Urban District Council colours. Alongside the Corgi model with the 61A Clifton headcode are a Bristol Greyhound coach and AEC Reliant KWE 370D with a Plaxton Panorama body.

 
 

   
  Pat Harris made up a hat trick of bus dioramas on the Sunday of the show, and peeking out of the garage between the repair ramp and the coach wash are half cab AEC double decker ORR 140 in West Bromwich Urban District Council colours. Alongside the Corgi model with the 61A Clifton headcode are a Bristol Greyhound coach and AEC Reliance KWE 370D with a Plaxton Panorama body.  
 

   
  MODEL FAIRGROUND by Martin Nash  
 

   
  Old buses never die - they just run away and join the travelling fair! On this visit, Martin Nash included a half cab double decker supporting the motorcyclists on the centrifugal Wall of Death.  
 

   
  Old buses never die - they just run away and join the travelling fair! On this visit, Martin Nash included a half cab double decker supporting the motorcyclists on the centrifugal Wall of Death.  
 

   
     
  BRISTOL AIRCRAFT / WESTERN REGION MODERNISES by Alan Drewett 4mm Scale  
 

   
 

One of only two Bristol 188 research aircraft rests in front of a Bristol Pullman

 
 

   
  One of my favourite macro digital pictures ever! Not only did it capture two West Country icons at once but it is in focus and not blurred! Click above for more on the Bristol 188 and read below for more on the Blue Pullman  
 

   
  Just as Brunel’s Great Western Railway had championed the Broad Gauge and lower quadrant semaphore signals, so British Railways Western Region made its own unique approach to modernisation after 1948. Following experiments with gas turbine traction – while Great Western pattern steam locomotives were still being outshopped from Swindon Works – Western Region management bucked the trend transition toward diesel electric locomotives by introducing its own fleet of diesel hydraulics from 1958.

Following five A1A-A1A 2000 bhp machines built by The North British Locomotive Company and numbered from D600, the D800 series "Warships" were based on the V200 Class built by Krauss-Maffei for Deutsche Bundesbahn. These combined fast running engines with stressed skin construction to offer far better power-to-weight ratios than the contemporary "Peaks" being built at Derby.

 
 

   
 

W.G. Drewett took this August 1962 shot of D856 "Trojan" at Swindon, about to leave for London Paddington. The diamond shaped North British Locomotive plate is visible below the BR emblem and nameplate and just to the right of the 20 mph sign. Only outshopped from Glasgow in November 1961 with works number 27985, it was originally allocated to Plymouth Laira depot. It was to be withdrawn from Newton Abbot in May 1971 and cut up at Swindon works the following January.

 
 

   
  W.G. Drewett took this August 1962 shot of D856 "Trojan" at Swindon, about to leave for London Paddington. The diamond shaped North British Locomotive plate is visible below the BR emblem and nameplate and just to the right of the 20 mph sign. Only outshopped from Glasgow in November 1961 with works number 27985, it was originally allocated to Plymouth Laira depot. It was to be withdrawn from Newton Abbot in May 1971 and cut up at Swindon works the following January.  
 

   
  The Swindon built variant of these B-B units – later known as BR Class 42 – were numbered D800 – D832 and D866 – D870 and combined Bristol-Siddeley Maybach engines with Mekydro transmissions. D833 – D865 – later known as BR Class 43 – were built by North British in Glasgow with M.A.N. prime movers coupled to Voith three stage torque converters.

Despite being capable of hauling fast, heavy trains like the Cornish Riviera Express and The Bristolian, all D800 "Warships" had been withdrawn as non-standard by 1972. In practical terms they were not fitted with compressors to work with new air braked carriages but the 1967 National Traction Plan also saw no future for hydraulic transmission motive power – only for Voith torque converters to return in the second generation diesel multiple units of the 1980s.

 
 

   
 

The driving Motor Brake vehicles of the Blue Pullman sets had either 12 First or 18 Second Class seats

 
 

   
  The driving Motor Brake vehicles of the Blue Pullman sets had either 12 First or 18 Second Class seats  
 

   
  Similarly ill-fated yet ahead of their time were the Blue Pullman diesel multiple units. Built by Metropolitan Cammell at Washwood Heath in Birmingham these were not just the World’s only all-Pullman diesel multiple unit trains but the ancestors of the InterCity 125 and Voyager/ Meridian units in service today.

Introduced in 1959 in either 4 or 6 car formations, the Blue Pullmans comprised both trailer and non-driving motor cars between driving Motor Brake vehicles. The driving Motor Brakes were fitted with North British / M.A.N. 1 000 bhp prime movers in engine rooms behind semi streamlined driving cabs. Electric transmission then energised G.E.C. traction motors under the driving Motor Brakes and Motor Parlour and Motor Kitchen cars. All Blue Pullman units were withdrawn in 1972.

 
 

   
 

1950s vintage aluminium bodied Southern National Bristol LS coach OTT 89 forms a Royal Blue service to Ilfracombe

 
 

   
  1953 vintage aluminium 39 seat Eastern Counties bodied Southern National Bristol LS coach OTT 89 forms a Royal Blue service to Ilfracombe.One chassis option on this model was 6 cylinder Gardner engine. Click on picture for more about Bristol buses in Gloucestershire  
 

   
 

A kind loan for the Sunday show was this dual purpose body Bristol RELH - parked on the apron in front of my own Bristol LS, Bristol Bloodhound missile and Land Rover, Bristol 188 and Blue Pullman - from CLIC stalwart Roger Webb. Registered as GHY 132K it featured a Lowestoft built ECW bus body on a Bristol coach chassis with coach style hubcaps and half coach style seats. The Tilling green and cream liveried Exclusive First Editions model - only released in July 2006 - also features large twin leaf front entry doors for urban passenger work and the more rounded styling reintroduced on Bristol buses after the relaxation of legal limits on bus length. As buses of the 1970s coud be more than 36 feet long, squarer utilitarian shapes were no longer needed to maximise passenger loads.

 
 

   
  A kind loan for the Sunday show was this dual purpose body Bristol RELH - parked on the apron in front of my own Bristol LS, Bristol Bloodhound missile and Land Rover, Bristol 188 and Blue Pullman - from CLIC stalwart Roger Webb. Registered as GHY 132K it featured a Lowestoft built ECW bus body on a Bristol coach chassis with coach style hubcaps and half coach style seats. The Tilling green and cream liveried Exclusive First Editions model - only released in July 2006 - also features large twin leaf front entry doors for urban passenger work and the more rounded styling reintroduced on Bristol buses after the relaxation of legal limits on bus length. As buses of the 1970s could be more than 36 feet long, squarer utilitarian shapes were no longer needed to maximise passenger loads.  
 

   
 

Click on picture for more about the Bristol Type 170 Mark 32 Superfreighter

 
 

   
  Click on picture for more about the Bristol Type 170 Mark 32 Superfreighter  
 

   
 

" I can't see the firing range on this Ordnance Survey map either, Leading Aircraftsman. Time to click on the picture for more about the Bristol Bloodhound surface to air missile!"

 
 

   
  " I can't see the firing range on this Ordnance Survey map either, Leading Aircraftsman. Time to click on the picture for more about the Bristol Bloodhound surface to air missile!"  
 

   
 

Bristol Belvedere XG 454 - with the later tailplane - dries out in the bright winter sunshine after a wet night parked next to the Bristol - Paddington main line in the 1960s.

 
 

   
  Bristol Belvedere XG 454 - with the later tailplane - dries out in the bright winter sunshine after a wet night parked next to the Bristol - Paddington main line in the 1960s. Click on picture for more on Rotors over Gloucestershire  
 

   
 

Representing the era when Bristol mainly built small single and twin engined aircraft was this Blenheim IV, seen staging out to North Africa in the desert markings of the Free French air force.

 
 

   
  Representing the era when Bristol mainly built small single and twin engined aircraft was this Blenheim IV, seen staging out to North Africa in the desert markings of the Free French air force.  
 

   
  INTERNATIONAL PLASTIC MODELLING SOCIETY GLOUCESTER BRANCH  
 

   
 

Hello Boys! Here's a super Czech model - if not a Czech supermodel - of a two seat "Mongol" trainer version of the MiG 21 "Fishbed" Mach 2 jet fighter in highly personalised markings with a cartoon pilot waterskiing on the tail. Also "czech out" the crew access ladder and highly detailed cockpit.

 
 

   
  Hello Boys! Here's a super Czech model - if not a Czech supermodel - of a two seat "Mongol" trainer version of the MiG 21 "Fishbed" Mach 2 jet fighter in highly personalised markings with a cartoon pilot waterskiing on the tail. Also "czech out" the crew access ladder and highly detailed cockpit.  
 

   
 

A rare model of a rare aircraft! While the delta winged MiG 21 was the World's most prolific jet fighter, Bell Airacomets only equipped one USAAF training squadron. A contemporary of the Gloster E 28/39 and early Meteors, it was soon supplanted by the Lockheed P-80 as America's first true interceptor with a gas turbine engine.

 
 

   
  A rare model of a rare aircraft! While the delta winged MiG 21 was the World's most prolific jet fighter, Bell Airacomets only equipped one USAAF training squadron. A contemporary of the Gloster E 28/39 and early Meteors, it was soon supplanted by the Lockheed P-80 as America's first true interceptor with a gas turbine engine.  
 

   
 

One of the 1/72 scale IPMS exhibits was the Anglo-American Joint Strike Fighter being developed as a replacement for the BAE Systems Harrier.

 
 

   
  One of the 1/72 scale IPMS exhibits was the Anglo-American Joint Strike Fighter being developed as a replacement for the BAE Systems Harrier. Click on picture for more about vertical take off jet aircraft  
 

   
  There is strength in unity, and so it was with great pleasure that the Cheltenham GWR Modellers welcomed the Gloucester branch of the International Plastic Modellers Society to their October 2006 event. The aircraft models that they brought along were mainly larger than my 1/72 scale offerings: 1/48 and 1/32 being more suited to fine detailing and weathering. Details of future IPMS events can be found on the home page of this website.  
 

   
  MODELLING DISPLAYS by Steve Harrod, Trevor Hale, Andi Dell and Rob Owst  
 

   
 

Proof of how scenic modelling in larger gauges - such as 0 in this case - can offer near-real results with the cars, buildings and people being as important as the locomotive. Midland Region allocated D7503 later became 25 153 under TOPS

 

   
  Proof of how scenic modelling in larger gauges - such as 0 in this case - can offer near-real results with the cars, buildings and people being as important as the locomotive. Midland Region allocated D7503 later became 25 153 under TOPS  
 

   
 

If D7503 with its three full-depth windscreen panels was the ultimate development of the British Railways approach to building Sulzer powered Type 2 Bo-Bos, 5209 harked back to the earlier Class 24 with the inclusion of gangway doors to allow locomotive crews access to other class members working in multiple unit.

 
 

   
  If D7503 with its three full-depth windscreen panels was the ultimate development of the British Railways approach to building Sulzer powered Type 2 Bo-Bos, 5209 - 25 059 under TOPS - harked back to the earlier Class 24 with the inclusion of gangway doors to allow locomotive crews access to other class members working in multiple unit.  
 

   
  Also in attendance were Robbie Burns of Robbie's Rolling Stock with 4mm and 2mm scale wagons for sale, Tony Pollestrone books, Cheltenham Model Centre ( Saturday Only ), Castle Trains (Sunday Only) Railway Artist Frederick Lea,The Festiniog Railway, the Iron Horse Videos of Richard Pretious, and Clive Reid's pre-enjoyed rolling stock.