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CHELTENHAM GWR MODELLERS GROUP


MODEL RAILWAY EXHIBITION


SATURDAY 2 APRIL AND SUNDAY 3 APRIL 2011

 
 

   
  THE NEXT EXHIBITION WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY 25 AND SUNDAY 26 OCTOBER 2014
 
 

     
 

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LAYOUT AND ATTRACTION REVIEW

 
 

   
  BOOTLEGGER CANYON by Steve Adcock

On30 Gauge 7mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Bootlegger Canyon was a fictional location set deep in North America's resource rich frontier land of the Colorado Rocky Mountains where, in 1925, railroading was extreme and the Wild West owed more to Sam Peckinpah than Randolph Scott!

 
 

    
  Bootlegger Canyon was a fictional location set deep in North America's resource rich frontier land of the Colorado Rocky Mountains where, in 1925, railroading was extreme and the Wild West owed more to Sam Peckinpah than Randolph Scott!

More specifically the town of Bootlegger Canyon was a major railroad junction and hub of the Denver, Darius, South Park and Pacific Railroad (DDSPR) situated at the western end of a ten mile long geological fault.  With rich veins of anthracite running through the area, coal was the main source of freight along with livestock and timber although the heavy extraction of both logs and fossil fuel were to damage the mountain environment.

When surveying a route for the DDSPR from Denver through the Platte Canyon - heavily wooded and once famous for its illicit alcohol production - towards the first mines at Darius, Leadville and Mount Zion it was clear that 4% gradients could not be avoided. This would not only make it difficult to haul trains from Denver into the Rockies but also to safely manage full coal trains back down through Bootlegger.  As a result of the tight curves and steep gradients a narrow gauge was chosen for the new iron road which also followed the canyon to avoid expensive tunnelling en route to the summit.

Bootlegger Canyon was Steve Adcock's third exhibition layout and his first rural and scenic rather than urban one.  As well as being inspired by photographs of preserved 3' gauge Colorado railroads and the availability of ready to run Bachmann rolling stock, Bootlegger Canyon also depicted the amazing scenery of the Rocky Mountains in its rich autumn colours.

 
 

 

   
 

Bootlegger Canyon was Steve Adcock's third exhibition layout and his first rural and scenic rather than urban one.  As well as being inspired by photographs of preserved 3' gauge Colorado railroads and the availability of ready to run Bachmann rolling stock, Bootlegger Canyon also depicted the amazing scenery of the Rocky Mountains in its rich autumn colours.

 
 

 

   
  BADGER'S YARD by Laurie Smallwood

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

Five years after Badger's Wharf graced St Margaret's Hall, Mr Smallwood continued his Mustelid theme with a slice of Britain's disappearing industrial history.  Surrounded by housing and factories, the very run down Badger's Yard was used for assembling wagons to be forwarded to local customers.

 
 

 

   
  Five years after Badger's Wharf graced St Margaret's Hall, Mr Smallwood continued his Mustelid theme with a slice of Britain's disappearing industrial history.  Surrounded by housing and factories, the very run down Badger's Yard was used for assembling wagons to be forwarded to local customers. 

The layout was based on an Inglenook shunting puzzle with 3 sidings, a headshunt and a main line to allow the trains to depart.  The idea was to marshal 5 of the 8 wagons on the layout into set order using the smallest number of moves.

The track was Peco Code 75, points were fitted with Seep motors and coupling and uncoupling was done electromagnetically with DG couplings,  The points and magnets were operated by switch panel and the locomotives DCC controlled.

 
 

 

   
 

The layout was based on an Inglenook shunting puzzle with 3 sidings, a headshunt and a main line to allow the trains to depart.  The idea was to marshal 5 of the 8 wagons on the layout into set order using the smallest number of moves.

 
 

 

   
  CLAYTON WEST by Mark Lambert

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Clayton West – which made its debut at Cheltenham in October 2008 – was based on a station that closed to traffic in 1983. However, Mark Lambert imagined that government renewal funding allowed the construction of new housing, businesses and a shopping village on the former colliery site. Electrification of the branch line in the early 1990s would have allowed through services from Manchester and Leeds although for cost reasons only the bay platform of the new station – built on former colliery sidings - was energised.  As such, Clayton West sought to portray the last years of the Nationalised railway network with a variety of locomotives, coaches and wagons that have almost entirely disappeared in the last two decades.

 
 

    
  Clayton West – which made its debut at Cheltenham in October 2008 – was based on a station that closed to traffic in 1983. However, Mark Lambert imagined that government renewal funding allowed the construction of new housing, businesses and a shopping village on the former colliery site. Electrification of the branch line in the early 1990s would have allowed through services from Manchester and Leeds although for cost reasons only the bay platform of the new station – built on former colliery sidings - was energised.  As such, Clayton West sought to portray the last years of the Nationalised railway network with a variety of locomotives, coaches and wagons that have almost entirely disappeared in the last two decades.

The shopping complex behind the station was a combination of Wimbledon’s "Centre Court" and Clark’s Village in Street, the sloping roofed distribution centre could handle palletised goods or parcels while a concrete pad beside the station was able to unload cement tankers or finished steel products. There was also an isolated section of track used to train signallers and sufficient siding space to accommodate engineer’s vehicles, locomotives resting between duties and spot traffic flows as well. 

Pictured above are blue 31 434, 60 047 "Robert Owen" (Coal sub sector), 20 131 (BRT liveried and at one time named "Almon B. Strowger") 20 169 in red and grey Central Services markings, Par St Blazey allocated 37 672 "Freight Transport Association" with the red diamonds of Railfreight Distribution and Crewe based 47 768 "Resonant" of Rail Express Systems.

Clayton West used a Lenz Compact DCC system to control its now-nearly-extinct late Nationalisation era trains with points, signals and lighting on a more traditional 12 volt dc system. The points were Peco Code 75 with C&L plain track offering optimum scale sleeper representation and spacing for 00.  The overhead catenary was made from modified Sommerfeldt parts and steel wire and many of the buildings were made from ready to use components.

 
 

 

   
 

Clayton West used a Lenz Compact DCC system to control its now-nearly-extinct late Nationalisation era trains with points, signals and lighting on a more traditional 12 volt dc system. The points were Peco Code 75 with C&L plain track offering optimum scale sleeper representation and spacing for 00.  The overhead catenary was made from modified Sommerfeldt parts and steel wire and many of the buildings were made from ready to use components.

 
 

    
  DUNSTER by Bristolian MRC

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

    
 

Dunster today is best known as a station on the preserved West Somerset Railway from Bishop's Lydeard to Minehead although this layout represented it in the 1930s and 40s.  As the nearest station to Dunster Castle - home of the Luttrell family for more than 600 years - however it was often visited by Dukes and Maharajahs - and their polo ponies in horse boxes - and was so more elaborate than the standard Great Western installation.

 
 

   
  Dunster today is best known as a station on the preserved West Somerset Railway from Bishop's Lydeard to Minehead although this layout represented it in the 1930s and 40s.  As the nearest station to Dunster Castle - home of the Luttrell family for more than 600 years - however it was often visited by Dukes and Maharajahs - and their polo ponies in horse boxes - and was so more elaborate than the standard Great Western installation.

The station building and signalbox were modified Hornby kits, the track was Peco finescale Code 75 and the signals were Ratio operated by Fulgurex motors.  The rolling stok was a mixture of proprietary and kit built

 
 

 

   
 

Dunster today is best known as a station on the preserved West Somerset Railway from Bishop's Lydeard to Minehead although this layout represented it in the 1930s and 40s.  As the nearest station to Dunster Castle - home of the Luttrell family for more than 600 years - however it was often visited by Dukes and Maharajahs - and their polo ponies in horse boxes - and was so more elaborate than the standard Great Western installation.

 
 

    
  HILLTON TMD by Rhys Harries

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

  During the 1950s Hillton was a thriving terminus station with a turntable and shed but post Beeching was closed and left to decay.  In the mid 1990s however, both EWS and Network Rail needed a new site for a new Traction and Maintenance Depot and so the old steam depot site was flattened and redeveloped for this purpose.  Also used by other train operating companies from South Wales and the West of England, Hillton TMD was very busy with locomotives arriving and departing for turns of duty, maintenance and refuelling.

 
 

   
  During the 1950s Hillton was a thriving terminus station with a turntable and shed but post Beeching was closed and left to decay.  In the mid 1990s however, both EWS and Network Rail needed a new site for a new Traction and Maintenance Depot and so the old steam depot site was flattened and redeveloped for this purpose.  Also used by other train operating companies from South Wales and the West of England, Hillton TMD was very busy with locomotives arriving and departing for turns of duty, maintenance and refuelling.

Due to public pressure and a grant from the Welsh Assembly, the old station was also re-developed as a transport hub and terminus on a single branch line off the main Gloucester to Newport route.

 
 

 

   
 

During the 1950s Hillton was a thriving terminus station with a turntable and shed but post Beeching was closed and left to decay.  In the mid 1990s however, both EWS and Network Rail needed a new site for a new Traction and Maintenance Depot and so the old steam depot site was flattened and redeveloped for this purpose.  Also used by other train operating companies from South Wales and the West of England, Hillton TMD was very busy with locomotives arriving and departing for turns of duty, maintenance and refuelling.

 
 

   
  NICTUN BORRUD 2K by Elliott Cowton

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Fareham and District MRC's 1960s era third rail Nictun Borrud was very well received at St Margaret's Hall back in October 2007 and Nictun Borrud 2K was its modern image replica, built by Elliott  - who had co-constructed the original - to show off his 21st Century trains.

 
 

   
  Fareham and District MRC's 1960s era third rail Nictun Borrud was very well received at St Margaret's Hall back in October 2007 and Nictun Borrud 2K was its modern image replica, built by Elliott  - who had co-constructed the original - to show off his 21st Century trains.

On the 2K version, the goods yard had been replaced by car sales and a petrol station, the electricity sub station had been upgraded and the former World War II military sidings had given way to a wagon maintenance facility: which also housed some familiar steam locomotives in very unfamiliar markings inspired by www.fictitiousliveries.co.uk

 
 

 

   
 

On the 2K version, the goods yard had been replaced by car sales and a petrol station, the electricity sub station had been upgraded and the former World War II military sidings had given way to a wagon maintenance facility: which also housed some familiar steam locomotives in very unfamiliar liveries!

 
 

    
  NORTH BRIDGE by Mike Kelly

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Pictured alongside the platform above is ex LNWR G2a Class 7F 0-8-0 49361 while below a police box with a flashing blue light stands next to a busy coal yard with a Bedford MK lorry.

 
 

   
  North Bridge is an area north west of Leicester City centre and this layout assumed that the Leicester and Swannington Railway - approaching from the west through Coalvile, Bardon Hill, Desford, Ratby and Glenfield  - terminated there rather than at West Bridge, closer to the Great Central line from Loughborough to Lutterworth. 

Although none of the buildings - mainly created from Metcalfe kits and bearing many real business names - were exact copies of any real infrastructure a splendid evocation of the early 1960s was achieved.

North Bridge also assumed that passenger services had not finished in 1928, that trains also arrived from Leicester London Road ( via a fictitious link over the Great Central ) as well as Coalville and that Glenfield Tunnel had been built to a more generous loading gauge.

The real Leicester West Bridge Yard was much bigger than the layout depicted and was still busy with oil, coal and other goods well in to the 1950s although in addition to a daily coal and twice daily goods train North Bridge handles traffic generated by a nearby mail order warehouse.

The trackwork was Peco Code 100 using small radius electrofrog points electrically operated while rolling stock comprised proprietary products modified and weathered.  North Bridge was also remarkable as the opened 2060mm x 430mm layout folded in two to form a 350mm deep box for transportation.

Pictured alongside the platform above is ex LNWR G2a Class 7F 0-6-0 49361 while below a police box with a flashing blue light stands next to a busy coal yard with a Bedford MK lorry.

 
 

 

   
 

Pictured alongside the platform above is ex LNWR 7F 0-6-0 49631 while below a police box with a flashing blue light stands next to a busy coal yard with a Bedford MK lorry.

 
 

 

   
  UNIVERSAL WORKS IN "NEARLY FELTHAM" by Alan Drewett

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

While the last traditional London tram ran on 6 July 1952, the diesel motive power being used to shunt the wagons at Universal Works was enjoying mixed fortunes.  D8195 was one of the last English Electric Class 20s to be  outshopped from Vulcan Works - in February 1967 - with four character destination indicators.  D8233 meanwhile was built by Clayton Equipment  for British Thomson Houston in August 1960 and despite being recently cleaned was to be withdrawn in 1969.

 
 

 

   
 

1968 was a year of change.  In May students rioted in Paris, in August British Railways ran its "Fifteen Guinea Special" farewell to standard gauge steam and in December Apollo 8 took the first astronauts into lunar orbit. 

Meanwhile in Feltham, Middlesex, next to an arm of the Grand Union Canal, part of the former Union Construction Company premises had been taken over by the wagon repair business of  (the fictional) Universal Ltd, although in a nod to the past a 1931 vintage Feltham tram is being restored for preservation by the apprentices. 

While the last traditional London tram ran on 6 July 1952, the diesel motive power being used to shunt the wagons at Universal Works was enjoying mixed fortunes.  D8195 was one of the last English Electric Class 20s to be  outshopped from Vulcan Works - in February 1967 - with four character destination indicators.  D8233 meanwhile was built by Clayton Equipment  for British Thomson Houston in August 1960 and despite being recently cleaned was to be withdrawn in 1969.

1968 also saw Patrick Troughton's Doctor Who foiling "The Invasion" of London by Cybermen using the network of sewers.  Some of this monochrome serial was filmed at the Guinness Brewery in Park Royal ( next door to Toucan Park, due for display in October ) and one Cyberman, pictured below, had obviously got lost - perhaps due to alcoholic marmite ingestion.  The slightly-overscale model was a free gift with a 2011 issue of Doctor Who Adventures Magazine and "The Invasion" also marked the debut of Brigadier Alastair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, played by the recently departed and much missed actor Nicholas Courtney.

 
 

 

   
 

1968 also saw Patrick Troughton's Doctor Who foiling "The Invasion" of London by Cybermen using the network of sewers.  Some of this monochrome serial was filmed at the Guinness Brewery in Park Royal ( next door to Toucan Park, due for display in October ) and one Cyberman, pictured below, had obviously got lost - perhaps due to alcoholic marmite ingestion.  The slightly-overscale model was a free gift with a 2011 issue of Doctor Who Adventures Magazine and "The Invasion" also marked the debut of Brigadier Alastair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, played by the recently departed and much missed actor Nicholas Courtney.

 
 

 

   
  THOMAS by Cheltenham GWR Modellers 00 Gauge 4mm Scale   
 

 

   
 

New to the Thomas layout in April 2011 was a blue 0-6-0 diesel shunter named Harry and numbered 25 in the Isle of Sodor fleet.

 
 

 

   
  New to the Thomas layout in April 2011 was a blue 0-6-0 diesel shunter named Harry and numbered 25 in the Isle of Sodor fleet.  
 

   
  HILLSIDE WORKS by Dave Griffin

009 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 


   
 

Constructed using Peco 009 proprietary track and a large amount of modeller's licence, the portable yet entertaining layout depicting fictional Hillside Works was set on the Welsh Borders during autumn in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  However, long term plans are to bring it up to date as a preserved railway - Hillside Works Heritage Centre - complete with working vintage machinery, tourist and cafe.

 
 

   
  Constructed using Peco 009 proprietary track and a large amount of modeller's licence, the portable yet entertaining layout depicting fictional Hillside Works was set on the Welsh Borders during autumn in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  However, long term plans are to bring it up to date as a preserved railway - Hillside Works Heritage Centre - complete with working vintage machinery, tourist and cafe.

For now though, rolling stock was a mixture of kit built and converted ready to run items mainly from RICO and Parkside Dundas with buildings both kit and scratch built using Ratio and Wills materials.  Scatters were from Woodland Scenics and Greenscene with bare deciduous trees made from soldered wire frame covered in plaster mix.  Locomotives were operated by handheld DC cab controllers with AC derived from an electrically isolated 15v transformer.  Another hand built transformer supplied the capacitor discharge unit while the point motors were a mixture of older SEEP and more modern PECO types.  Custom built working lamp posts and coloured light signals were also featured.

 
 

   
 

Constructed using Peco 009 proprietary track and a large amount of modeller's licence, the portable yet entertaining layout depicting fictional Hillside Works was set on the Welsh Borders during autumn in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  However, long term plans are to bring it up to date as a preserved railway - Hillside Works Heritage Centre - complete with working vintage machinery, tourist and cafe.

 
 

   
  BAGBOROUGH WEST by Nick Salzman

21mm Gauge 3mm Scale

 
 

   
 

The 7' 1/4" Broad Gauge of the Great Western Railway lasted from its opening in 1838 until its final conversion in May 1892 and Bagborough West represented a fictitious branch line terminus off the Broad Gauge Bristol and Exeter Railway in Somerset.  Lord Bodger, the local landowner and entrepreneur put up the vast majority of the money needed to build the line in order to have his own access to the railway.  He travelled in his own private saloon - taking his horse and carriage with him - and could be seen on the station in his distinctive top hat.

 
 

   
  The 7' 1/4" Broad Gauge of the Great Western Railway lasted from its opening in 1838 until its final conversion in May 1892 and Bagborough West represented a fictitious branch line terminus off the Broad Gauge Bristol and Exeter Railway in Somerset.  Lord Bodger, the local landowner and entrepreneur put up the vast majority of the money needed to build the line in order to have his own access to the railway.  He travelled in his own private saloon - taking his horse and carriage with him - and could be seen on the station in his distinctive top hat.

The track and wheel standards were the same as used for 3mm Society fine scale but built to 21mm gauge using Broad Gauge Society 4mm scale bridge rail soldered to copper clad sleeper strip. 

All the rolling stock was hand built with some modification of standard gauge kits while the buildings were based on actual Broad Gauge prototypes such a the engine shed and station building from Watchet on the West Somerset Railway, the goods shed from Henley on Thames.

 
 

 

   
 

The 7' 1/4" Broad Gauge of the Great Western Railway lasted from its opening in 1838 until its final conversion in May 1892 and Bagborough West represented a fictitious branch line terminus off the Broad Gauge Bristol and Exeter Railway in Somerset.  Lord Bodger, the local landowner and entrepreneur put up the vast majority of the money needed to build the line in order to have his own access to the railway.  He travelled in his own private saloon - taking his horse and carriage with him - and could be seen on the station in his distinctive top hat.

 
 

   
  MARSH CHIPPING by David Westwood

N Gauge 2mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Marsh Chipping was a fictional location on the former Oxford, Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway set in the early 1960s.  The track plan was based on the real one at Chipping Campden ( with an added branch ) while the goods shed was based on the structure at Moreton-in-Marsh.

 
 

   
  Marsh Chipping was a fictional location on the former Oxford, Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway set in the early 1960s.  The track plan was based on the real one at Chipping Campden ( with an added branch ) while the goods shed was based on the structure at Moreton-in-Marsh.  
 

 

   
 

Marsh Chipping was a fictional location on the former Oxford, Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway set in the early 1960s.  The track plan was based on the real one at Chipping Campden ( with an added branch ) while the goods shed was based on the structure at Moreton-in-Marsh.

 
 

   
  MODEL BUS FEDERATION represented by Paul Mellor 4mm Scale  
 

   
 

Representing the caring, sharing side of The North West Road Car Company (Glos) Ltd was this Dennis Trident, originally with Alexander ALX400 bodywork but now one of three fleet members introduced in 2003 with front and rear panels derived from an ALX500 body designed for a three axle chassis and modified from a Corgi Original Omnibus Company model depicting a PSV exported to China.  This particular Trident - registered as VX 02 - is in the colours of www.pink-car-rally.com , another organisation which - like this exhibition -combines transport enthusiasm with the war against cancer.

 
 

   
  Representing the caring, sharing side of The North West Road Car Company (Glos) Ltd was this Dennis Trident, originally with Alexander ALX400 bodywork but now one of three fleet members introduced in 2003 with front and rear panels derived from an ALX500 body designed for a three axle chassis and modified from a Corgi Original Omnibus Company model depicting a PSV exported to China.  This particular Trident - registered as VX 02 - is in the colours of www.pink-car-rally.com , another organisation which - like this exhibition -combines transport enthusiasm with the war against cancer.

Of course, no bus company can operate without trained drivers and this - fictional  - DTU joined The North West Road Car Company (Glos) Ltd fleet as a red-liveried revenue-earning dual door Bristol VR with an Alexander body in 1968.  The model itself was modified from a Dinky Leyland Atlantean and in training guise the rear engined bus has had the front entrance replaced by an instructor window and a small vestigial glazed panel to allow the student driver to sight the kerb.

 
 

   
 

Of course, no bus company can operate without trained drivers and this - fictional  - DTU joined The North West Road Car Company (Glos) Ltd fleet as a red-liveried revenue-earning dual door Bristol VR with an Alexander body in 1968.  The model itself was modified from a Dinky Leyland Atlantean and in training guise the rear engined bus has had the front entrance replaced by an instructor window and a small vestigial glazed panel to allow the student driver to sight the kerb.

   
 

    
  NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT MODELLERS

represented by David Mellor 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

In his "Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis" of 1686 Sir Isaac Newton first presented his three laws of motion. His first law stated that every object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force.  It is also a law of physics that force equals mass times acceleration and accelerating a mass - be it by means of donkey or diesel engine - requires fuel.  Unfortunately it is now a law of economics that the price of fuel including excise duty can be too expensive for some haulage companies to stay in business.  These facts were at the centre of a simple but poignant Mellor Brother's display comprising a line up of Joseph Rice lorries and the Gloucester Citizen article reporting the cessation of the Hempstead based logistics firm after 161 years.

 
 

   
  In his "Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis" of 1686 Sir Isaac Newton first presented his three laws of motion. His first law stated that every object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force.  It is also a law of physics that force equals mass times acceleration and accelerating a mass - be it by means of donkey or diesel engine - requires fuel.  Unfortunately it is now a law of economics that the price of fuel including excise duty can be too expensive for some haulage companies to stay in business.  These facts were at the centre of a simple but poignant Mellor Brother's display comprising a line up of Joseph Rice lorries and the Gloucester Citizen article reporting the cessation of the Hempstead based logistics firm after 161 years.  
 

   
 

In his "Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis" of 1686 Sir Isaac Newton first presented his three laws of motion. His first law stated that every object will remain at rest or in uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force.  It is also a law of physics that force equals mass times acceleration and accelerating a mass - be it by means of donkey or diesel engine - requires fuel.  Unfortunately it is now a law of economics that the price of fuel including excise duty can be too expensive for some haulage companies to stay in business.  These facts were at the centre of a simple but poignant Mellor Brother's display comprising a line up of Joseph Rice lorries and the Gloucester Citizen article reporting the cessation of the Hempstead based logistics firm after 161 years.

 
 

   
  TRAVEL 2000 LTD by Andy Peckham 4mm Scale ( Sunday only )  
 

   
 

Andy Peckham's surprisingly diverse transport company moved up a level in 2011 with this new building to keep the wedding hire fleet out of the rain.  Also of note to its left was part of the front of a Stagecoach PSV inside an open shipping container full of scrap items while one of Black and White's smaller coaches - a Dennis Lancet with a Plaxton Paramount body - received maintenance on the ramp.

 
 

   
  Andy Peckham's surprisingly diverse transport company moved up a level in 2011 with this new building to keep the wedding hire fleet out of the rain.  Also of note to its left was part of the front of a Stagecoach PSV inside an open shipping container full of scrap items while one of Black and White's smaller coaches - a Dennis Lancet with a Plaxton Paramount body - received maintenance on the ramp.  
 

 

   
 

Andy Peckham's surprisingly diverse transport company moved up a level in 2011 with this new building to keep the wedding hire fleet out of the rain.  Also of note to its left was part of the front of a Stagecoach PSV inside an open shipping container full of scrap items while one of Black and White's smaller coaches - a Dennis Lancet with a Plaxton Paramount body - received maintenance on the ramp.

 
 

    
  TONY'S TOYS by Tony Ingram 4mm scale  
 

    
 

New to St Margaret's Hall for CLIC Sargeant but well known on the outdoor vintage transport show scene was Churchdown based Tony Ingrams with his 1/50 scale display themed on Steam on The Road.  As well as tiers of Burrell, Fowler and other crane and showman's traction engines, Tony also banged the gong for Joseph Rank Ltd with this Foden steam lorry piled high with sacks of "The World's Choicest Flour" from London's Premier Mills.  Joseph's son Joseph Arthur Rank ( 1888-1972 ) would become Baron Rank after his contributions both to the British film industry and photocopying - via the Rank Xerox organisation with its strong ties to Mitcheldean in Gloucestershire.

 
 

    
  New to St Margaret's Hall for CLIC Sargeant but well known on the outdoor vintage transport show scene was Churchdown based Tony Ingrams with his 1/50 scale display themed on Steam on The Road.  As well as tiers of Burrell, Fowler and other crane and showman's traction engines, Tony also banged the gong for Joseph Rank Ltd with this Foden steam lorry piled high with sacks of "The World's Choicest Flour" from London's Premier Mills.  Joseph's son Joseph Arthur Rank ( 1888-1972 ) would become Baron Rank after his contributions both to the British film industry and photocopying - via the Rank Xerox organisation with its strong ties to Mitcheldean in Gloucestershire.  
 

 

   
 

New to St Margaret's Hall for CLIC Sargeant but well known on the outdoor vintage transport show scene was Churchdown based Tony Ingrams with his 1/50 scale display themed on Steam on The Road.  As well as tiers of Burrell, Fowler and other crane and showman's traction engines, Tony also banged the gong for Joseph Rank Ltd with this Foden steam lorry piled high with sacks of "The World's Choicest Flour" from London's Premier Mills.  Joseph's son Joseph Arthur Rank ( 1888-1972 ) would become Baron Rank after his contributions both to the British film industry and photocopying - via the Rank Xerox organisation with its strong ties to Mitcheldean in Gloucestershire.

 
 

    
  MODELLING DISPLAYS

by Trevor Hale, Mark Begley, Steve Harrod and Harvey Faulkner-Aston

 
 
 

   
 

Trevor Hale's 2mm finescale marshalling yard played host to some Western Region Warship diesel hydraulic locomotives while Harvey Faulkner-Aston - best known for his Mexican dioramas - surprised everyone with a 5.5mm to the foot scale scene "Chaos in Cairo?" which used 9mm gauge Peco track to represent a 20 inch / 500mm railway used to take spoil from a Romano-Greek archaeological dig site.

 
 

   
  Trevor Hale's 2mm finescale marshalling yard played host to some Western Region Warship diesel hydraulic locomotives while Harvey Faulkner-Aston - best known for his Mexican dioramas - surprised everyone with a 5.5mm to the foot scale scene "Chaos in Cairo?" which used 9mm gauge Peco track to represent a 20 inch / 500mm railway used to take spoil from a Romano-Greek archaeological dig site. 

The "ruga" skip wagons were from Malcolm Savage of the 5.5mm Association while the flat bed was an N gauge chassis with a scratchbuilt top.

The baseboard was 9mm thick MDF covered with builder's sharp sand with real stone outcrops and he classical columns were resin items from the Scenix range with other ruins, altar etc were also resin items from Monolith Design.  Bluemoon Miniatures available from Durham based Old Glory were the source of both the archaeological workers and the occupant of the sarcophagus on the flat wagon - dug up just in time for Mummy's - I mean Mother's - Day.

 

 
 

    
 

The baseboard was 9mm thick MDF covered with builder's sharp sand with real stone outcrops and he classical columns were resin items from the Scenix range with other ruins, altar etc were also resin items from Monolith Design.  Bluemoon Miniatures available from Durham based Old Glory were the source of both the archaeological workers and the occupant of the sarcophagus on the flat wagon - dug up just in time for Mummy's - I mean Mother's - Day.

 
 

     
  Also in attendance were Cheltenham Model Centre (Saturday) Castle Trains (Sunday),Clive Reid (RCSW Models) Iron Horse Videos, The Festiniog Railway and Robbie's Rolling Stock.(Saturday)

DVDs of the Cheltenham GWR Modellers Exhibitions from 2006 onward are now available from Richard Pretious of Iron Horse Video Productions based at 77 Tilney Close, Alton, Hampshire, GU34 2BG.