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CHELTENHAM GWR MODELLERS GROUP


MODEL RAILWAY EXHIBITION


SATURDAY 29 AND SUNDAY 30 OCTOBER 2011

 
 

   
  THE NEXT EXHIBITION WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY 25 AND SUNDAY 26 OCTOBER 2014
 
 

     
 

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LAYOUT AND ATTRACTION REVIEW

 
 

   
  SEVERN MILL by Thornbury & South Gloucestershire MRC
 

0 Gauge 7mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Had the Midland Railwayʼs Thornbury branch been extended to the river, it would probably have been a light railway in the Colonel H. Stephens style, serving a timber yard with a small station nearby. Assuming that it was not a rich business, the company would have acquired a few second-hand locomotives and coaches. With the main income from freight, the passenger service would have been infrequent. This was the basis of Severn Mill, which measures 16' x 3'

 
 

    
  Had the Midland Railwayʼs Thornbury branch been extended to the river, it would probably have been a light railway in the Colonel H. Stephens style, serving a timber yard with a small station nearby. Assuming that it was not a rich business, the company would have acquired a few second-hand locomotives and coaches. With the main income from freight, the passenger service would have been infrequent. This was the basis of Severn Mill, which measures 16' x 3'

The headshunt behind the station was rather cramped but challenging and the coal merchant tended to get peeved every time his wagons were shunted out of the way to allow a delivery to the wood merchant or the factory.

Severn Mill's track was hand-made from light section Code 100 flat bottomed rail in the manner of the Nidd Valley Light Railway upon cork. Cab control was used and points have H&M motors. The three locomotives and most of the rolling stock were kit-built using realistic three-link couplings. Most of the buildings were scratch-built, mainly scribed Polyfilla or DAS on plywood structures.
 
 

 

   
 

Severn Mill's track was hand-made from light section Code 100 flat bottomed rail in the manner of the Nidd Valley Light Railway upon cork. Cab control was used and points have H&M motors. The three locomotives and most of the rolling stock were kit-built using realistic three-link couplings. Most of the buildings were scratch-built, mainly scribed Polyfilla or DAS on plywood structures.

 
 

 

   
  NEWHAM GOODS TRURO by Brian Wilkinson

P4 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

Newham started life as the terminus for the West Cornwall Railway at Truro in April 1855 and continued to be so until May 1859 when most trains were diverted into the new station of the Cornwall / Great Western Railway leaving Newham as a goods depot with the occasional passenger train.

 
 

 

   
  Newham started life as the terminus for the West Cornwall Railway at Truro in April 1855 and continued to be so until May 1859 when most trains were diverted into the new station of the Cornwall / Great Western Railway leaving Newham as a goods depot with the occasional passenger train.

The West Cornwall came about by the Hayle and Penzance Railway and its constituents wishing to build a line to Truro and its quays to tap into the china clay and farm produce market.  Isambard Kingdom Brunel was engaged as the engineer for the line which surprisingly for him was built to the standard gauge.  The station at Newham had a Brunel style overall roof with a hip roofed station building, single platform, goods shed and other buildings already on the quay at the time.  The goods depot lasted well into the 20th Century and only closed in 1976.

Newham Goods Truro was built for the 18.83 challenge and took 2 1/2 years to build.  All track and points were hand laid ply and rivet, 95% of the buildings were scratch built with the rest from kits and all the ship models were Langley kits.  The base boards were constructed on the Barry Norman style of 4mm ply box beams for ends and sides and 6.5mm ply for the top.  Points were worked using piano wire and bell cranks.

Pictured above between a Great Western horse box and Toad brake van from far away Acton on the quay of the River Fal inlet is Great Western 517 Class 0-4-2T 835. This was outshopped from the Great Western Railway's Wolverhampton Stafford Road works in December 1873 to Lot R with the constructors number 226.  Allocated to Worcester in 1922, this 1868 designed ancestor of the more famous 14xx Class 0-4-2T was withdrawn from Swindon in February 1935.

Hauling a different design of guard's van and cylindrical gas tank wagon below, meanwhile, was 738, one of the "1076" or "Buffalo" Class 0-6-0 tank engines originally outshopped from Swindon works as cabless side tank locomotives in 1872.  These engines were later rebuilt as saddle tanks with half cabs and later still as pannier tanks.  738 was allocated to Paddington in 1922 and was withdrawn from Swansea Landore shed in August 1936.

Elements of the designs of both 835 and 738 appear in the slightly older Wolverhampton Stafford Road built Great Western 633 Class 0-6-0T 635 which has appeared on more than one occasion as Guest Motive Power on Capital Works.  All three tank locomotives were constructed during the time - from 1864 to 1877 - when Joseph Armstrong had succeeded Sir Daniel Gooch as Locomotive Superintendent of the Great Western Railway, having previously been in charge of standard gauge locomotives at Stafford Road Works in Wolverhampton with, as the old Ian Allen spotters books used to put it, "wide powers of design and construction".  In fact Joseph Armstrong's post at Wolverhampton was filled from 1864 to 1896 by his brother George.

 
 

 

   
 

Hauling a different design of guard's van and cylindrical gas tank wagon below, meanwhile, was 738, one of the "1076" or "Buffalo" Class 0-6-0 tank engines originally outshopped from Swindon works as cabless side tank locomotives in 1872.  These engines were later rebuilt as saddle tanks with half cabs and later still as pannier tanks.  738 was allocated to Paddington in 1922 and was withdrawn from Swansea Landore shed in August 1936.

 
 

 

   
  BURTON BRADSTOCK by Chris Lester

EM Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Burton Bradstock was set in the late 1950s and featured the fictional terminus of the line to Burton Bradstock which assumed that the Abbotsbury Branch had been extended as proposed with sufficient finance towards Bridport.

 
 

    
  Burton Bradstock was set in the late 1950s and featured the fictional terminus of the line to Burton Bradstock which assumed that the Abbotsbury Branch had been extended as proposed with sufficient finance towards Bridport. 

The Abbotsbury Railway in Dorset was first proposed during the 1870s and finally came into existence during the 1880s with hopes of making profits by extracting iron ore from a site near Portesham and also limestone near to Abbotsbury itself, along with local produce and livestock such as cattle and sheep.  One of several schemes also anticipated extending the line further westwards, eventually as far as Bridport and beyond to Axminster and thence to Exeter.  The hope was that boat traffic via the port of Weymouth would enable travellers from the continent to access the south west of England. 

Burton Bradstock was Chris Lester's first solo EM layout and used Western Region rolling stock, either made from kits or re-chassied and re-wheeled ready to run models. 

Several of the structures on the layout were scratch built from styrene and Wills moulded stone sheet to represent real buildings on the line such as the goods shed at Portesham and Abbotsbury Locoshed and Water Tower although Ratio and Wills kits were used for some huts and the station building.  Trackwork was hand built using plywood sleepers and C&L track components with turnouts operated electrically by slow-action motors with an EMGS type controller.

In particular I liked Burton Bradstock's Station Garage ( seen below ) with its evocative enamel signs, cat and dog engaged in a stand off and Austin A35, as made famous by Aardman Animation's Wallace and Gromit in their film "The Curse of the Were Rabbit".

Pictured above by Burton Bradstock's water tower meanwhile was 2538, one of the famous "Dean Goods" 0-6-0s more formally known by the Great Western Railway as the 2301 Class.  Outshopped from Swindon in August 1897 and carrying works number 1579 as part of Lot number108, 2538 was allocated to Shrewsbury in 1922, Cardiff in 1947 and was finally withdrawn as the last of its class by British Railways at Oswestry in May 1957.

William Dean was Locomotive Superintendent of the Great Western Railway from 1877 to 1902 and the 2301 Class - which broke with GWR tradition by having just inside frames - was in production from 1883 to 1899. Of the 260 Dean Goods built, large numbers served in France and Salonika ( now Thessalonika, Greece ) in the 1914-1918 war, in France again during 1939-1945 ( some being captured after Dunkirk and run of occupied French railways ) and even in China as part of post-war UNRRA operations.

Fifty-four 2301 Class locomotives passed to British Railways in 1948, mostly being used on Welsh branch lines due to their light axle loads. They were progressively replaced by new BR Standard Class 2 2-6-0s and just one Dean Goods - 2516 - is preserved today at Steam in Swindon.

 
 

 

   
 

In particular I liked Burton Bradstock's Station Garage ( seen below ) with its evocative enamel signs, cat and dog engaged in a stand off and Austin A35, as made famous by Aardman Animation's Wallace and Gromit in their film "The Curse of the Were Rabbit".

 
 

    
  EGYPT BREWERY by Paul Cope

EM Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

    
 

Egypt Brewery was an attempt to present an industrial scene in an exhibition context with potential for both shunting and through running from one hidden area to another.  The brewery buildings - with main brew house to the left and boiler house and cooperage in the centre - were constructed from the American DPM modular system with a warehouse behind the small locomotive shed.  In the foreground the entrance was flanked by the main brewery offices and the gatehouse.  Locomotives were mainly derived from brass kits by High level and Agenoria and most had 97:1+ reduction gearing for enhanced slow running.

 
 

   
  Egypt Brewery was an attempt to present an industrial scene in an exhibition context with potential for both shunting and through running from one hidden area to another.  The brewery buildings - with main brew house to the left and boiler house and cooperage in the centre - were constructed from the American DPM modular system with a warehouse behind the small locomotive shed.  In the foreground the entrance was flanked by the main brewery offices and the gatehouse.  Locomotives were mainly derived from brass kits by High Level and Agenoria and most had 97:1+ reduction gearing for enhanced slow running.  Many also had appropriately ancient Egyptian names such as 0-6-0ST "Nefertiti" seen on shed below.  
 

 

   
 

Egypt Brewery was an attempt to present an industrial scene in an exhibition context with potential for both shunting and through running from one hidden area to another.  The brewery buildings - with main brew house to the left and boiler house and cooperage in the centre - were constructed from the American DPM modular system with a warehouse behind the small locomotive shed.  In the foreground the entrance was flanked by the main brewery offices and the gatehouse.  Locomotives were mainly derived from brass kits by High Level and Agenoria and most had 97:1+ reduction gearing for enhanced slow running.  Many also had appropriately ancient Egyptian names such as 0-6-0ST "Nefertiti" seen on shed below.

 
 

    
  HOOKWOOD by Jim Bryant

EM Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

When the South Eastern Railway reached the small village of Westerham in July1881 it was assumed by the local populace that it was only a matter of time before the branch line from Dunton Green ( on the London Victoria - Sevenoaks - Tonbridge main line ) via Brasted would be extended south west for four miles to Oxted on the London Victoria -Croydon - Newhaven main line. In fact this never happened due to the huge cost of extensive engineering works required but Hookwood imagined that the line had been built as a secondary route from London to the Channel Ports. Hookwood station itself would have been located about a mile north east of Oxted and the layout depicted the scene in the mid1960s with station and goods shed buildings based on those at Westerham and BR Southern Region third rail electrification 

 
 

   
  When the South Eastern Railway reached the small village of Westerham in July1881 it was assumed by the local populace that it was only a matter of time before the branch line from Dunton Green ( on the London Victoria - Sevenoaks - Tonbridge main line ) via Brasted would be extended south west for four miles to Oxted on the London Victoria -Croydon - Newhaven main line. In fact this never happened due to the huge cost of extensive engineering works required but Hookwood imagined that the line had been built as a secondary route from London to the Channel Ports. Hookwood station itself would have been located about a mile north east of Oxted and the layout depicted the scene in the mid1960s with station and goods shed buildings based on those at Westerham and BR Southern Region third rail electrification.

The locomotives were mainly modified ready-to-run examples using Ultrascale EM wheels and A1 detailing kits. The 2BIL ( 2 cars, Both Including Lavatories ) EMU was an Ian Kirk kit with Branch Lines motor/gearbox and extra detailing. Wagons were mostly super-detailed kits and EM Society wheels. Spratt & Winkle couplings are used with strategically placed electromagnets for uncoupling. Hookwood also featured working semaphore signals and a decidedly non-working workman!

 
 

 

   
 

The locomotives were mainly modified ready-to-run examples using Ultrascale EM wheels and A1 detailing kits. The 2BIL ( 2 cars, Both Including Lavatories ) EMU was an Ian Kirk kit with Branch Lines motor/gearbox and extra detailing. Wagons were mostly super-detailed kits and EM Society wheels. Spratt & Winkle couplings are used with strategically placed electromagnets for uncoupling. Hookwood also featured working semaphore signals and a decidedly non-working workman!

 
 

   
  PORTSKERRA by Tim Tincknell

EM Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Portskerra was the terminus of a fictional Highland Railway branch line on the north coast of Scotland.  Although a branch to Portskerra was proposed as a Light Railway in 1998 and some surveying work was carried out, no further progress was made.  The model used typical Highland Railway style buildings and incorporated track layout features from other Highland terminii.

 
 

 

   
 
Portskerra was the terminus of a fictional Highland Railway branch line on the north coast of Scotland.  Although a branch to Portskerra from Forsinard was proposed as a Light Railway in 1898 and some surveying work was carried out, no further progress was made.  The model used typical Highland Railway style buildings and incorporated track layout features from other Highland terminii.

Portskerra was depicted in 1915 with increased Great War traffic, including many "foreign" company wagons such as those of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway.  With much of the pre 1914 commercial cross-Channel goods traffic being suspended due to the hostilities, many undertakings in south east England had wagons to spare by this time and these were duly sent North of the Border.  However, most "Jellicoe Special"  trains took their coal only as far as Grangemouth on the Firth of Forth where solid fuel for the Home Fleet at Scapa Flow was loaded onto coastal shipping.  In turn, with coasters in demand for coal, most other goods normally delivered by sea went north by rail.

Although as a mere Sassenach I was most familiar with the bright yellow livery of the 1894 vintage Jones Goods 103 - Britain's first 4-6-0 steam locomotive and sole remaining HR locomotive - most of the Highland Railway's motive power was, by 1915 at least, a plain dark olive green to match its coaching stock.  However, its goods wagons added a splash of colour with their red oxide paintwork under white san serif lettering.

Founded from an amalgamation of smaller companies on 29 June 1865, the Highland Railway included among its Locomotive Superintendents William Stroudley ( 1866 -1869) , David Jones ( 1869-1896 ), Peter Drummond ( 1896- 1911 ), Frederick George Smith ( 1912-1915 ) Christopher Cumming (1915-1922 ) and finally D.C. Urie before the Highland Railway became part of the LMS in 1923.

Despite having suffered a scalded leg while testing his Sharp Stewart built Goods 4-6-0s, David Jones went on to design the Loch Class 4-4-0s of 1896, of which 15 were built by Dubs of Glasgow and a final three erected by successor firm North British in 1917.  These late additions to the class were needed as they were the heaviest locomotives permitted on the line from Inverness to Kyle of Lochalsh, where much material was landed from the newly-belligerent United States to evade the threat posed by U-boats to larger West Coast ports.

HR 120 "Loch Ness" was the second of the 2P rated class - built with louvered chimneys and domed cabs like the Jones Goods - and became LMS 14380 before withdrawal in the 1930s.

As well as the familiar bracket on the smokebox, HR locomotives also carried marker lights on the left hand side of the cab roof and on the right hand side of the tender.  This was to allow a guard in a "birdcage" passenger or goods vehicle to keep the locomotive in clear view along the twisting lines north to Thurso and south to Stanley Junction just north of Perth.

Portskerra featured C&L plain track, handbuilt points, buildings scratchbuilt from plasticard and wood ( including the splendid locoshed below, based on examples at Thurso and Fochabers Town ), Noch electrostatic grass fibres and leafless trees made from twisted wire covered in filler.  Locomotives were kit built and other rolling stock kit built, modified or scratchbuilt from Highland Railway Society drawings.

 
 

 

   
 

Portskerra featured C&L plain track, handbuilt points, buildings scratchbuilt from plasticard and wood ( including the splendid locoshed below, based on examples at Thurso and Fochabers Town ), Noch electrostatic grass fibres and leafless trees made from twisted wire covered in filler.  Locomotives were kit built and other rolling stock kit built, modified or scratchbuilt from Highland Railway Society drawings.

 
 

    
  ASHBURTON by Dick Hewins

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Ashburton arrived in the hands of its present owner ready built but in need of TLC, with scenery yellowed with age and in need of restoration and repainting.  The baseboards also now fit together properly and modeller's licence allowed some of the buildings to be slightly inaccurate and the whole station to be on straight track rather than curved.

 
 

   
  Ashburton arrived in the hands of its present owner ready built but in need of TLC, with scenery yellowed with age and in need of restoration and repainting.  The baseboards also now fit together properly and modeller's licence allowed some of the buildings to be slightly inaccurate and the whole station to be on straight track rather than curved.  Churchward Small Prairie 4555 (seen above and below ) was new to Tyseley shed in September 1924, allocated to Machynnleth in 1947, was withdrawn from Laira in December 1963 and is now preserved.  It and its class mates are discussed in more depth elsewhere on this website.  
 

 

   
 

Ashburton arrived in the hands of its present owner ready built but in need of TLC, with scenery yellowed with age and in need of restoration and repainting.  The baseboards also now fit together properly and modeller's licence allowed some of the buildings to be slightly inaccurate and the whole station to be on straight track rather than curved.

 
 

 

   
  NEWCASTLE MARKET by Paul Wilcox

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

LMS Ivatt designed  2-6-2T 41229 was pictured above ready to leave Newcastle Market with a two coach suburban train while standing at the same platform below in front of the working level crossing gates was a Birmingham RCW Class 104 diesel multiple unit comprising Driving Motor Composite Lavatory M50513 and Driving Motor Brake Second M50461.

 
 

 

   
  Newcastle Market was based on a line that was planned but never actually completed.  In 1910 the North Staffordshire Railway constructed a line from Trentham, on the main line south of Stoke on Trent, south west to Trentham Park to carry excursion traffic to nearby Trentham Gardens.  The original intention had been to continue the line northwards to join up with the NSR Pool Dam freight only branch in Newcastle Under Lyme, thereby providing a link which would allow coal trains from Silverdale coalfield to bypass the busy bottleneck at Stoke.  Although a substantial steel bridge was built across the main A34 road west of Trentham Park station, the outbreak of war in 1914 resulted in any further extension being cancelled, despite the bridge lasting until the scrap iron drive of 1940. The branch line to Trentham Park was however still used for excursions until the 1950s.

Newcastle Market meanwhile supposed that the extension from Trentham Park was not only completed but was actually built in the 1890s with a passenger terminus constructed on open land at Newcastle Under Lyme next to a large livestock market - hence the name.  North of the station the branch remained freight only for coal traffic from Silverdale and a small oil terminal.

Set in the late 1950s, passenger trains consisted of DMUs working via the mainline to Manchester and steam hauled workings to the same destination via the Potteries Loop Line.  There was also a morning and evening workers train for staff at Crewe works ( which really did run from Stoke after the closure of Stoke Locomotive Works in 1926 ) as well as a pick up freight - sometimes conveying cattle to market or goods to a nearby agricultural warehouse.

Locomotives and rolling stock were a mixture of scratchbuilt, kit-built and detailed / improved proprietary models while the buildings were all scratchbuilt with the exception of some lineside huts and the signalbox modified from a Ratio kit - after the discovery that NSR signalboxes were nearly all on brick bases.

The station baseboards were hinged and folded up into a box shaped structure, designed to be easily portable in the back of an MGB GT.  Trackwork was by Scaleway with points being constructed on copperclad sleepers.  Train cassettes were used on the fiddle yards at either end of the layout.

LMS Ivatt designed  2-6-2T 41229 was pictured above ready to leave Newcastle Market with a two coach suburban train while standing at the same platform below in front of the working level crossing gates was a Birmingham RCW Class 104 diesel multiple unit comprising Driving Motor Composite Lavatory M50513 and Driving Motor Brake Second M50461.

 
 

 

   
 

Newcastle Market meanwhile supposed that the extension from Trentham Park was not only completed but was actually built in the 1890s with a passenger terminus constructed on open land at Newcastle Under Lyme next to a large livestock market - hence the name.  North of the station the branch remained freight only for coal traffic from Silverdale and a small oil terminal.

 
 

 

   
  TOUCAN PARK by Alan Drewett

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

The Park Royal Guinness Brewery opened in 1937, having been built from 1933 to the design of Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who also designed Battersea Power Station.  Toucan Park supposes that the rail connection to the Brewery was continued to meet the West Coast Main Line at Wembley as a Depression era job creation scheme, a diversionary route against future aerial bombardment and a first section of London orbital railway.  A locomotive depot was added in 1938 to supplement nearby Old Oak Common and Willesden and this stayed open as usual throughout the Blitz until taking a direct hit from a V2 rocket in 1944, after which it was more open than usual.  Following the introduction of Freightliner traffic, a two road diesel depot was built on the ruins of the old roundhouse with washing and refuelling plant at the rear of the workshops.  In 2005 the former Guinness buildings near the depot headshunt were demolished and the Toucan Park Freightliner Depot next door extended.

 
 

 

   
 

The Park Royal Guinness Brewery - the first outside Dublin - opened in 1937, having been built from 1933 to the design of Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who also designed Battersea Power Station. 

Toucan Park supposes that the rail connection to the Brewery was continued to meet the West Coast Main Line at Wembley as a Depression era job creation scheme, a diversionary route against future aerial bombardment and a first section of London orbital railway.  A locomotive depot was added in 1938 to supplement nearby Old Oak Common and Willesden and this stayed open as usual throughout the Blitz until taking a direct hit from a V2 rocket in 1944, after which it was more open than usual. 

Following the introduction of Freightliner traffic, a two road diesel depot was built on the ruins of the old roundhouse with washing and refuelling plant at the rear of the workshops.  In 2005 the Park Royal Guinness Brewery closed and was converted into flats while its outlying (fictional) buildings near the depot headshunt were demolished and the Toucan Park Freightliner Depot next door extended.

This was Toucan Park's first operational outing at an exhibition and although I had planned to run a quartet of 1990 era Class 47 locomotives - last seen on Sulzer Gold Cup in 2007 -  I mentioned to Roger Webb a week before at Eastcombe that if he wanted to bring along any 00 gauge diesels to St Margaret's Hall he would be most welcome to operate them.  He turned up with a crate of engines, many of them Heljan models that were both easy on the eye and ran much more smoothly than most Bachmann and Hornby products! 

Thanks to Roger's generosity I enjoyed a splendid weekend marshalling, among others, Classes 25, 31, 35, 37 and most of all Class 14 D9521, the 12" to the foot example of which is currently resident on the Dean Forest Railway.  More pictures and analyses of these diesel locomotives from the 1950s and 60s are scheduled for a separate Toucan Park Guest Motive Power article on this website in the near future.

Being located opposite Clive Reid also gave me the chance to help test some potential new purchases and as a result I now know that Toucan Park can handle Class 60 locomotives.

 
 

 

   
 

The Park Royal Guinness Brewery opened in 1937, having been built from 1933 to the design of Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who also designed Battersea Power Station.  Toucan Park supposes that the rail connection to the Brewery was continued to meet the West Coast Main Line at Wembley as a Depression era job creation scheme, a diversionary route against future aerial bombardment and a first section of London orbital railway.  A locomotive depot was added in 1938 to supplement nearby Old Oak Common and Willesden and this stayed open as usual throughout the Blitz until taking a direct hit from a V2 rocket in 1944, after which it was more open than usual.  Following the introduction of Freightliner traffic, a two road diesel depot was built on the ruins of the old roundhouse with washing and refuelling plant at the rear of the workshops.  In 2005 the former Guinness buildings near the depot headshunt were demolished and the Toucan Park Freightliner Depot next door extended.

 
 

 

   
  THOMAS by Cheltenham GWR Modellers 00 Gauge 4mm Scale   
 

 

   
 

Thomas himself was in fine form in October 2011, hauling a mixed train with a Fina petrol tanker just behind his bunker.

 
 

 

   
  Thomas himself was in fine form in October 2011, hauling a mixed train with a Fina petrol tanker just behind his bunker.  
 

   
  UPLYME by John O'Dell

12mm Gauge 3mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Uplyme was based on the former LSWR built Southern Railway seaside terminus at Lyme Regis during the 1950s and 60s.  The real Lyme Regis station was actually much closer to the village of Uplyme than the town it was named after and due to tortuous curves the branch was only successfully operated by Adams Radial 4-4-2T Tanks and Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2Ts.  Both types ran on the layout, but were joined by M7 0-4-4Ts, West Country pacifics and BR Standard steam locomotives.  The buildings were accurate copies of those actually found at the Dorset resort and most of the locomotives and rolling stock were built from 3mm Society kits.

 
 

   
  Uplyme was based on the former LSWR built Southern Railway seaside terminus at Lyme Regis during the 1950s and 60s.  The real Lyme Regis station was actually much closer to the village of Uplyme than the town it was named after and due to tortuous curves the branch was only successfully operated by Adams Radial 4-4-2T Tanks and Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2Ts like 41307 seen below.  Both types ran on the layout, but were joined by M7 0-4-4Ts ( such as 30111, pictured above), West Country pacifics and BR Standard steam locomotives.  The buildings were accurate copies of those actually found at the Dorset resort and most of the locomotives and rolling stock were built from 3mm Society kits.  
 

 

   
 

Uplyme was based on the former LSWR built Southern Railway seaside terminus at Lyme Regis during the 1950s and 60s.  The real Lyme Regis station was actually much closer to the village of Uplyme than the town it was named after and due to tortuous curves the branch was only successfully operated by Adams Radial 4-4-2T Tanks and Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2Ts.  Both types ran on the layout, but were joined by M7 0-4-4Ts, West Country pacifics and BR Standard steam locomotives.  The buildings were accurate copies of those actually found at the Dorset resort and most of the locomotives and rolling stock were built from 3mm Society kits.

 
 

 

   
  CLAYDON by David Westwood

N Gauge 2mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

Claydon depicted a fictional Cotswold village served by a branch from the BR Western Region Oxford to Worcester main line during one of the winters of the late 1950s and early 1960s.  The 4' x 2' layout started as an oval test track but developed into an exercise in minimum space modelling  with the aim of creating a snow clad Christmas scene.  Track was Peco fine scale, code 55 and buildings were mainly SD Mouldings with some Ratio and Kestrel kits.  Locomotives and rolling stock were the usual mixture of Farish, Dapol, Peco and N gauge society kits with much of the  RTR stock repainted and/or weathered.

 
 

 

   
  Claydon depicted a fictional Cotswold village served by a branch from the BR Western Region Oxford to Worcester main line during one of the winters of the late 1950s and early 1960s.  The 4' x 2' layout started as an oval test track but developed into an exercise in minimum space modelling  with the aim of creating a snow clad Christmas scene.  Track was Peco fine scale, code 55 and buildings were mainly SD Mouldings with some Ratio and Kestrel kits.  Locomotives and rolling stock were the usual mixture of Farish, Dapol, Peco and N gauge society kits with much of the  RTR stock repainted and/or weathered.  Tribute must also be paid to the concept and execution of two swans for the village pond which were made of Blu-tak and fuse wire!  
 

 

 

 
 

Claydon depicted a fictional Cotswold village served by a branch from the BR Western Region Oxford to Worcester main line during one of the winters of the late 1950s and early 1960s.  The 4' x 2' layout started as an oval test track but developed into an exercise in minimum space modelling  with the aim of creating a snow clad Christmas scene.  Track was Peco fine scale, code 55 and buildings were mainly SD Mouldings with some Ratio and Kestrel kits.  Locomotives and rolling stock were the usual mixture of Farish, Dapol, Peco and N gauge society kits with much of the  RTR stock repainted and/or weathered.

 
 

 

   
  INVASION OF EUROPE by Mike Bradley

 4mm Scale

 
 

   
 

Newcomers to St Margaret's Hall, the IPMS Thornbury Branch treated exhibition patrons to no less than four dioramas representing the D-Day landings on Omaha Beach itself and also the conflict further inland and across strategic bridges between Allied and Wehrmacht forces.

 
 

 

   
  A newcomer to St Margaret's Hall, Mike Bradley of the International Plastic Modelling Society's Thornbury Branch treated exhibition patrons to no less than four dioramas representing the D-Day landings on Omaha Beach itself and also the conflict between Allied and Wehrmacht forces further inland and across strategic bridges.

As it happened, these dioramas were displayed less than a fortnight before the passing of a quiet man whose courage arguably made Operation Overlord the success that it was.

Aircraft reconnaissance photos had revealed suspected staked mines on the proposed landing beaches and a fortnight before D-Day 22-year-old Royal Engineer mine expert Lieutenant John Stone, accompanied by a Sergeant and Corporal from the same regiment, was taken by motor torpedo boat across the Channel for a secret nocturnal inspection by dinghy.

 Interviewed about his experiences in 2004, Mr Stone revealed that he had volunteered for the mission without realising what he was letting himself in for and said: "It did not all go to plan. When we got into our dinghy it capsized and we had to wade the rest of the way. We started walking up the beach and the idea was that the sergeant went in front with a mine detector, I went second and the corporal went at the back with a lifeline for us to to find our way back down again.  We saw sentries patrolling and we got to within about 40 yards of one smoking a cigarette. A searchlight passed over us several times, but they never saw us."

The dark clothed Royal Engineers discovered wooden poles with Teller Mark 42 anti-tank mines on top positioned along the shoreline so that they would have been hidden at high tide and devastated landing craft.

Mr Stone said: ‘If they had gone in at high tide it would have knocked the bottom of the landing craft out and sunk them before they got to the beaches. As I understand it, the information we brought back led to the timing of D-Day being changed from high to low water. And our measurements showed our tanks were able to go between the poles on the beach.’

As a result thousands more soldiers made it safely to shore along the five Normandy beaches on D-Day, giving the Allies a strong foothold on Nazi-occupied Europe.

On their return to England the three Royal Engineers were immediately driven to Whitehall for a personal debriefing by General Montgomery and informed that two other clandestine survey teams had failed in their missions: one group not landing at all due to rough seas and the other trio being captured by the Germans who did not realise the significance of what was being attempted.

For his bravery Mr Stone - who died on 10 November 2011 aged 89 - was presented with the Military Cross by General Montgomery and received a congratulatory telegram from Winston Churchill.

However, the 12 000 Allied casualties on D-Day would also have been greater without a whole range of scientists and covert operators, including Sapper Captain Scott-Bowden and Sergeant Ogden Smith of the Royal Marines Special Boat Section who swam ashore at Omaha beach to establish if the shingle could bear the weight of a tank.  Similarly, Combined Operations Pilotage Parties (COPP) - set up after the disastrous Dieppe landings of 1942 -measured gradients, tested sand depth and laid beacons from midget submarines in support of the amphibious landings.

 
 

 

   
 

In the face of continuing retreat across eastern and southern Europe, German designers responded with tanks that sacrificed speed and manoeuvrability for armour and firepower, the Tiger Mark 1 leading on to the formidable King Tiger and Elefant tank-destroyers ( one of which is pictured above) along with the Jagdtiger with its astonishing 128mm gun. However, the sloping frontal armour and high velocity 75mm gun of the 1942 vintage Panther took their cue from the Soviet T-34

 
 

 

   
 

Further inland meanwhile, the blitzkrieg tactics of Nazi Generals Von Runstedt and Guderian had favoured fast fighting vehicles for use with shock troops and air power and the Panzer Mk IV – used against Poland in 1939 and stopping just short of Dunkirk in 1940 – reflected this.

However, at Rastenburg on 20 April 1942 Adolf Hitler received an unusual birthday present – the choice of two new heavy tank designs offered by Porsche and Henschel. Both were built to a Wehrmacht specification for a 45 ton vehicle mounting a modified version of the 88mm anti-aircraft gun which was also a lethal tank-buster.

Despite being 11 tons overweight, the Henschel design involved no new building techniques and so was selected for production. The first "Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger Ausf. H" ( pictured below) was outshopped in August 1942.

Its hull and superstructure were made of one unit using thick sheets of armour plate welded together in interlocking comb joints. The top of the hull was also formed of a single sheet, pierced by a turret ring over six feet wide to allow a turret big enough to take the breech of the muzzle braked electrically fired 88mm gun - as well as a second MG34 machine gun, fired by the gunner using a pedal.

At the front of the Tiger were compartments for the driver – who turned a wheel operating a differential steering unit rather than pulling levers to change direction – and a radio operator / machine gunner. Separating them was the gearbox connected to the engine at the rear beyond the central fighting compartment. This was originally a 21 litre Maybach V12 petrol engine although a more powerful 24 litre version was substituted from December 1943. A typical ammunition load weighed ton and comprised 92 rounds, half being armour piercing shot and half high explosive shells.

However, the Tiger’s weight was a problem from the outset. The first 495 examples were fitted with snorkel engine breathers so that rivers could be forded. The snorkels allowed the Tigers to submerge in 13 feet of water for up to 2 hours and so avoid bridges that might collapse under their weight. Two widths of track were also provided – a 20" version for transport and a 28 " combat variant – which wrapped round overlapping wheels on a torsion bar suspension. While this gave a stable and comfortable ride however, the wheels easily clogged with mud which could freeze in cold weather. For this reason the Russians always tried to attack Tiger tanks at dawn when their tracks were likely to be immobilised!

Although Tigers were later integrated into Waffen SS armoured formations, they were initially used in independent battalions – normally going into battle surrounded by a "Panzerkeil" – or tank wedge – of lighter vehicles. In this way Panzer III s or IV s could compensate for the slow forward speed and turret traverse of the Tiger. This was especially true of the Panzer IVs rearmed with a longer barrelled version of its original 75mm gun.

In January 1943 a panzerkeil of four Tigers and eight medium tanks destroyed or forced the retreat of 24 Soviet T-34s trying to re-open supply routes into Leningrad - while in North Africa Free French 75mm artillery shells bounced off the four inch thick armour of Tiger tanks at a range of less than 50 yards. Like the wide-open steppes of the south western USSR, the North African desert was natural tank country but in both landscapes and after both the Battles of Stalingrad and El Alamein – both in late 1942 – Nazi tank forces began the long retreat to Berlin.

By the time that the first of 1350 Tiger Mark 1s were outshopped in August 1942 Germany faced the well – armoured T-34 tank of the Soviet Union on the Eastern Front. Also fitted with an impressive 85mm gun, the T-34 was produced in vast numbers in a factory east of the Ural mountains.

The battle of Kursk also proved that Tigers could be overwhelmed by greater numbers of enemy tanks and as the Third Reich began to run out of fuel for these gas-guzzing behemoths they increasingly fell prey to the spring loaded hollow charged warheads of PIAT mortars. Gloster built Hawker Typhoon aircraft firing 60 lb rocket projectiles also took their toll, as did newer British 17 lb anti tank guns. And had the war dragged further into 1945 Tigers may well have met their match in the British Centurion tank, which went on to serve with a dozen armies in the 1950s.

In the face of continuing retreat across eastern and southern Europe, German designers responded with tanks that sacrificed speed and manoeuvrability for armour and firepower, the Tiger Mark 1 leading on to the formidable King Tiger and Elefant tank-destroyers ( one of which is pictured above) along with the Jagdtiger with its astonishing 128mm gun. However, the sloping frontal armour and high velocity 75mm gun of the 1942 vintage Panther took their cue from the Soviet T-34

These proved particularly lethal against the relatively thin-armoured Sherman after D-Day, but like its Russian counterpart the American tank had the advantage of being built in large numbers outside the bombing range of the Luftwaffe. In total war, quantity had its own quality.

Nevertheless the Allied saying in Normandy was "If one Tiger is reported send four Cromwells or Shermans and expect to lose three of them!"  Indeed, such was the nature of the Normandy countryside with its sunken roads and high hedges that Tiger tanks often lay in wait for the advancing Allies and struck without warning - making their own grim contribution to the 150 000 invading troops killed or wounded between D-Day and the capture of Caen more than six weeks later.

 
 

 

   
 

Newcomers to St Margaret's Hall, the IPMS Thornbury Branch treated exhibition patrons to no less than four dioramas representing the D-Day landings on Omaha Beach itself and also the conflict further inland and across strategic bridges between Allied and Wehrmacht forces.

 
 

   
  MODEL BUS FEDERATION represented by Paul Mellor 4mm Scale  
 

   
 

New to the Mellor Brother's layby diorama was this former single decker bus serving snacks and complete with experimental patch of purple paint, rust drips for the roof sign and rear chimney

 
 

   
  New to the Mellor Brother's layby diorama was this former single decker bus serving snacks and complete with experimental patch of purple paint, rust drips for the roof sign and rear chimney  
 

   
  NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT MODELLERS

represented by David Mellor 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

Between the St George and Union flags, the red legend of Avonline Transport Ltd of Corse Lawn was in real life built up of horizontal lines but was re-created by Paul scoring a knife through more conventional paintwork.  At one point in the first decade of the 21st Century, the Volvo FH16 610 was the most powerful lorry tractor unit in Britain with a power output almost twice that of a BR Class 08 diesel shunter although with a fuel consumption of only 7.8 miles per gallon of DERV!

 
 

 

   
  However, while 2010 had marked the Golden Jubilee of the fictional North Western Road Car Company (Glos) Ltd, 2011 was the turn of the Mellor Brother's lorries to take a bow. 

Between the St George and Union flags, the red legend of Avonline Transport Ltd of Corse Lawn was in real life built up of horizontal lines but was re-created by Paul scoring a knife through more conventional paintwork.  At one point in the first decade of the 21st Century, the Volvo FH16 610 was the most powerful lorry tractor unit in Britain with a power output almost twice that of a BR Class 08 diesel shunter although with a fuel consumption of only 7.8 miles per gallon of DERV!

Also ready to take on abnormal loads was this MAN TGX reworked from an Oxford Die Cast model and presented - suitably customised - in the colours of our friends at Moreton Valence based Harleywood Haulage.  As such it makes an interesting comparison with the Oxford Die Cast model of the MAN TGX XLX operated by Eric Vick.

 
 

 

   
 

Also ready to take on abnormal loads was this MAN TGX reworked from an Oxford Die Cast model and presented - suitably customised - in the colours of our friends at Moreton Valence based Harleywood Haulage.  As such it makes an interesting comparison with the Oxford Die Cast model of the MAN TGX XLX operated by Eric Vick.

 
 

   
 

When it comes to accurately representing this ERF coal lorry from the John Parsons of Newent fleet, the Mellor Brothers will go to any length!

 
 

   
  And when it comes to accurately representing this ERF coal lorry from the John Parsons of Newent fleet though, the Mellor Brothers will go to any length!  
 

   
  TRAVEL 2000 LTD by Andy Peckham 4mm Scale ( Sunday only )  
 

   
 

Andy Peckham's surprisingly diverse transport company moved up a level in 2011 with a new building to keep the wedding hire fleet out of the rain but taking centre stage at the Autumn show was the Mercedes Sprinter minibus seen below and the larger luxury PSVs above.  Both the Black and White coach and Black Prince were Neoplan City Liners while Black Panther was a Volvo B12B with, appropriately enough, a Plaxton Panther body.  Also maintaining a dark achromatic theme in the fleet was Black Knight, a Volvo B12R with  Van Hoole Alize T9 coachwork.

 
 

   
  Andy Peckham's surprisingly diverse transport company moved up a level in 2011 with a new building to keep the wedding hire fleet out of the rain but taking centre stage at the Autumn show was the Mercedes Sprinter minibus seen below and the larger luxury PSVs above.  Both the Black and White coach and Black Prince were Neoplan City Liners while Black Panther was a Volvo B12B with, appropriately enough, a Plaxton Panther body.  Also maintaining a dark achromatic theme in the fleet was Black Knight, a Volvo B12R with  Van Hoole Alize T9 coachwork.  
 

 

   
 

Andy Peckham's surprisingly diverse transport company moved up a level in 2011 with a new building to keep the wedding hire fleet out of the rain but taking centre stage at the Autumn show was the Mercedes Sprinter minibus seen below and the larger luxury PSVs above.  Both the Black and White coach and Black Prince were Neoplan City Liners while Black Panther was a Volvo B12B with, appropriately enough, a Plaxton Panther body.  Also maintaining a dark achromatic theme in the fleet was Black Knight, a Volvo B12R with  Van Hoole Alize T9 coachwork.

 
 

    
  MODELLING DISPLAYS by Trevor Hale, Steve Harrod, Rob Owst, Harvey Faulkner-Aston, Mark Begley ( Saturday only) and Andi Dell (Sunday only )  
 

   
 

Rob Owst's 4mm scale Gloucester RCW built Class 128 diesel parcels unit made a welcome return in the company of 55 019 "Royal Highland Fusilier" to celebrate the 50th anniversary of production Deltics and also Steve Harrod's superb Gauge 1 North British Class 22 diesel locomotive D6331 and some Class 29 cab modules.  Harvey Faulkner-Aston meanwhile delighted visitors with his Egyptian themed diorama.

 
 

 

   
 

Rob Owst's 4mm scale Gloucester RCW built Class 128 diesel parcels unit made a welcome return in the company of 55 019 "Royal Highland Fusilier" to celebrate the 50th anniversary of production Deltics and also Steve Harrod's superb Gauge 1 North British Class 22 diesel locomotive D6331 and some Class 29 cab modules.  Harvey Faulkner-Aston meanwhile delighted visitors with his Egyptian themed diorama.

 
 

   
 

Rob Owst's 4mm scale Gloucester RCW built Class 128 diesel parcels unit made a welcome return in the company of 55 019 "Royal Highland Fusilier" to celebrate the 50th anniversary of production Deltics and also Steve Harrod's superb Gauge 1 North British Class 22 diesel locomotive D6331 and some Class 29 cab modules.  Harvey Faulkner-Aston meanwhile delighted visitors with his Egyptian themed diorama.

 
 

 

     
 

Rob Owst's 4mm scale Gloucester RCW built Class 128 diesel parcels unit made a welcome return in the company of 55 019 "Royal Highland Fusilier" to celebrate the 50th anniversary of production Deltics and also Steve Harrod's superb Gauge 1 North British Class 22 diesel locomotive D6331 and some Class 29 cab modules.  Harvey Faulkner-Aston meanwhile delighted visitors with his Egyptian themed diorama.

   
 

     
  Also in attendance were Cheltenham Model Centre (Saturday) Castle Trains (Sunday),Clive Reid (RCSW Models) Iron Horse Videos ( Saturday only) and railway books, timetables and photographs by Stewart Blencowe.  
 

 

   
 

In fact Stewart was able to supply me with this sepia postcard of Gloucester RCW built GWR railcar 18, whose image was the undoubted inspiration for the Wills's Cigarette card I use as the mascot of this website!

 
 

 

   
  In fact Stewart was able to supply me with this sepia postcard of Gloucester RCW built GWR railcar 18, whose image was the undoubted inspiration for the Wills's Cigarette card I use as the mascot of this website!  
 

 

   
 

In fact Stewart was able to supply me with this sepia postcard of Gloucester RCW built GWR railcar 18, whose image was the undoubted inspiration for the Wills's Cigarette card I use as the mascot of this website!