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GLOUCESTER MODEL RAILWAY SHOW

HUCCLECOTE METHODIST CHURCH

  SATURDAY 9 JULY 2011

 
 

 

   
  LAYOUT AND ATTRACTION REVIEW  
 

 

   
 

After five years on the Gloucestershire model engineering exhibition circuit I was extremely proud to be part of the successful return of a model railway show to Gloucester City for the first time since 2006. Over 350 people visited the one-day exhibition at Hucclecote Methodist Church, publicised with organiser Alan Postlethwaite's own image of Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific  35026 "Lamport & Holt Line" stopping at Axminster on a Waterloo bound express in August 1959.

 
 

 

   
  After five years on the Gloucestershire model engineering exhibition circuit I was extremely proud to be part of the successful return of a model railway show to Gloucester City for the first time since 2006. Over 350 people visited the one-day exhibition at Hucclecote Methodist Church, publicised with organiser Alan Postlethwaite's own image of Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific  35026 "Lamport & Holt Line" stopping at Axminster on a Waterloo bound express in August 1959.

All proceeds went towards the upkeep and improvement of the Church. Methodism in Hucclecote grew rapidly from 1838 with the present church dating from 1929, the School Hall - containing the exhibition - being added in 1963 and the Welcome Hall - hosting the splendid  buffet - a product of refurbishment in 2000

Trade support came from Ian's Trains of 12 Hollyoak Road, Streetly, Sutton Coldfield,  West Midlands B74 2FG ( Telephone 0121 353 1948 )

The layouts presented at the show also traced the development of model railway gauges, starting with 0 : 7mm to 1' or 1/ 43 scale and 32mm track gauge.

H0 (Half 0) was developed in Germany in the 1930s with a scale of 35mm to 1' or 1/ 87 and a track gauge of 16.5mm. However as the H0 motors of the time were too big for the smaller  British outline locomotives 00 gauge was invented with a scale of 4mm to the foot ( 1:76 ) but still using the H0 gauge of 16.5mm.  This was too narrow for British finescale modellers so EM (Eighteen Millimetre) gauge was developed with a track spacing of 18.2mm. All these scales have narrow gauge derivatives including 009 which has a scale of 4mm to the foot but uses the 9mm track usually associated with 2mm to the foot N gauge.

 
 

 

   
  SEVERN MILL by Thornbury & South Gloucestershire MRC

0 Gauge 7mm Scale
 
 

 

   
 

Had the Midland Railwayʼs Thornbury branch been extended to the river, it would probably have been a light railway in the Colonel H. Stephens style, serving a timber yard with a small station nearby. Assuming that it was not a rich business, the company would have acquired a few second-hand locomotives and coaches. With the main income from freight, the passenger service would have been infrequent. This was the basis of Severn Mill, which measures 16' x 3'

 
 

 

   
  Had the Midland Railwayʼs Thornbury branch been extended to the river, it would probably have been a light railway in the Colonel H. Stephens style, serving a timber yard with a small station nearby. Assuming that the Vale of Berkeley Light Railway was not a rich business, the company would have acquired a few second-hand locomotives and coaches. With the main income from freight, the passenger service would have been infrequent. This was the basis of Severn Mill, which measured 16' x 3'

The headshunt behind the station was rather cramped but challenging and the coal merchant tended to get peeved every time his wagons were shunted out of the way to allow a delivery to the wood merchant or the factory.

The track was hand-made from light section Code 100 flat bottomed rail - in the manner of the Nidd Valley Light Railway - upon cork. Cab control was used and points had H&M motors.  Most of the buildings were scratch-built, mainly scribed Polyfilla or DAS on plywood structures. The three locomotives and most of the rolling stock were kit-built using realistic three-link couplings, including the Vale of Berkeley Light Railway's Midland Railway type 10 ton brake van, similar to one used on the Earl of Wemyss Private Railway.
 
 

 

   
  Had the Midland Railwayʼs Thornbury branch been extended to the river, it would probably have been a light railway in the Colonel H. Stephens style, serving a timber yard with a small station nearby. Assuming that the Vale of Berkeley Light Railway was not a rich business, the company would have acquired a few second-hand locomotives and coaches. With the main income from freight, the passenger service would have been infrequent. This was the basis of Severn Mill, which measured 16' x 3'  
 

 

   
  THE BREWERY by Ian Manderson

EM Gauge 4mm Scale
 
 

 

   
 

The Brewery was built for the 2002 DEMU small layout competition which among other things stipulated that the entries must not exceed an area of 654 square inches and have at least one working point. However, The Brewery was also designed for a life beyond the competition as a display arena for a variety of weathered shunters ( including Hunslet built Class 05 D 2595 ) and wagon types, some of which are scratch built. The grain uploading shed and hidden sidings were linked by a space-saving traverser and the main building, loading dock and grain unloading building derived from the Walthers meat packing warehouse kit. The 5' x 18" baseboard - which also features a sector plate - was built as a single unit with legs that plugged into pockets underneath.

 
 

 

   
  The Brewery was built for the 2002 Diesel and Electric Modellers United small layout competition which among other things stipulated that the entries must not exceed an area of 654 square inches and have at least one working point. However, The Brewery was also designed for a life beyond the competition as a display arena for a variety of weathered shunters ( including Hunslet built Class 05 D 2595 and 08 114, previously  D3180 and originally 13180 when built at Derby in 1955 ) and wagon types, some of which are scratch built. The grain uploading shed and hidden sidings were linked by a space-saving traverser and the main building, loading dock and grain unloading building derived from the Walthers meat packing warehouse kit. The 5' x 18" baseboard - which also features a sector plate - was built as a single unit with legs that plugged into pockets underneath.  
 

 

   
  The Brewery was built for the 2002 DEMU small layout competition which among other things stipulated that the entries must not exceed an area of 654 square inches and have at least one working point. However, The Brewery was also designed for a life beyond the competition as a display arena for a variety of weathered shunters ( including Hunslet built Class 05 D 2595 and 08 114, previously  D3180 and originally 13180 when built at Derby in 1955 ) and wagon types, some of which are scratch built. The grain uploading shed and hidden sidings were linked by a space-saving traverser and the main building, loading dock and grain unloading building derived from the Walthers meat packing warehouse kit. The 5' x 18" baseboard - which also features a sector plate - was built as a single unit with legs that plugged into pockets underneath.  
 

 

   
  BROCKLEY ACRES by Alan Postlethwaite

00 Gauge 4mm Scale
 
 

 

   
 

Brockley Acres for me is not so much a layout as an idea in action. It has no defined shape but its track plan can be build and rebuilt to suit any exhibition venue. Other recyclable features include an ex Trix Twin truss bridge, town square, quay, and four stations - Green Lane, Ebley, Stroud and Brockley - all served by nearly six scale miles of track.

 
 

 

   
  Brockley Acres for me is not so much a layout as an idea in action, a table top railway capturing the spirit of Hornby Dublo and Trix Twin. It has no defined shape but its track plan can be build and rebuilt to suit any exhibition venue. Other recyclable features include an ex Trix Twin truss bridge, town square, quay, and four stations - Green Lane, Ebley, Stroud and Brockley - all served by nearly six scale miles of track.

Brockley Acres is set around 1950 with trains from the Big Four - GWR, LMS, LNER and SR - as well as some early BR and pre-Grouping items operating a fictitious secondary line between Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.  There can be as many as five electrical sections with analogue controllers requiring three operators to work the entirely manual points linking Peco and Hornby tracks.

In his instance the base boards were 3mm MDF covered with old snooker cloth and supported by paste tables. The 22' x 7' layout took five hours to assemble and test with a Stationmaster controlling the Anticlockwise Main Line and the Terminus while the Yardmaster controlled the Clockwise Main Line and the Outer Goods Loop.

Of particular interest on Brockley Acres at Hucclecote were LMS diesel 10000, English Electric Deltic D9000 "Royal Scots Grey" and LNER Garratt  2395 built by Peter Moore

 
 

 

   
 

Brockley Acres is set around 1950 with trains from the Big Four - GWR, LMS, LNER and SR - as well as some early BR and pre-Grouping items operating a fictitious secondary line between Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.  There can be as many as five electrical sections with analogue controllers requiring three operators to work the entirely manual points linking Peco and Hornby tracks.

 
 

 

   
  ELDER DYKE FOR CLOGGER by Eddie Whitlock


00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

The Hull, Beverley and Scarborough Railway (HB&SR) was proposed to form a direct route across the flat land between Driffield and Seamer Junction without having to use the coastal route via Bridlington and Filey or the inland route via Malton.

 
 

 

   
  The Hull, Beverley and Scarborough Railway (HB&SR) was proposed to form a direct route across the flat land between Driffield and Seamer Junction without having to use the coastal route via Bridlington and Filey or the inland route via Malton.

The line from Driffield to Seamer was single track and completed in 1846 with intermediate stations at Kilham, Langtoft, Elderdyke and Foxholes before the HB&SR was absorbed into the York and North Midland Railway.  The York and North Midland controlled lines in the Hull, Whitby and Scarborough areas until 1854 when it amalgamated with the York, Newcastle and Berwick Railway and the Leeds Northern Railway to form the North Eastern Railway.  The North Eastern Railway controlled most of the lines in the north east of England between the Humber and the Tweed and became part of the LNER at Grouping in 1923.

At Elderdyke there was a short branch to Clogger to capture the vegetable traffic.  Elderdyke was not the largest village on this section of the route, so was not blessed with a passing loop, but it was the most convenient location for the Clogger branch to join the route. 

There was a siding connecting the works of Moore's printers, who had acquired the Second World War contract to print ration books for the government, and like the vegetable traffic, this generated many van movements.  Coal and general goods also arrived at Elderdyke by rail although passenger services were not well patronised outside the weekly Clogger market.  HB&SR passenger trains were in any case never more than four carriages long.

The 8' x 5' layout was set in 1945 when the LNER embarked on its renumbering scheme so some locomotives carried old and some new numbers.  Similarly, both a Sentinel steam railcar and its replacement C16 4-4-2T and push-pull carriages appeared, trains being changed via a cassette system in the non-scenic rear area.

 
 

 

   
 

The line from Driffield to Seamer was single track and completed in 1846 with intermediate stations at Kilham, Langtoft, Elderdyke and Foxholes before the HB&SR was absorbed into the York and North Midland Railway.  The York and North Midland controlled lines in the Hull, Whitby and Scarborough areas until 1854 when it amalgamated with the York, Newcastle and Berwick Railway and the Leeds Northern Railway to form the North Eastern Railway.  The North Eastern Railway controlled most of the lines in the north east of England between the Humber and the Tweed and became part of the LNER at Grouping in 1923.

 
 

 

   
 

CAPITAL WORKS by Alan Drewett

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
  At the Capital Works of Morland and Anderson meanwhile, wagons from railways all over London and beyond - some taken out of traffic while still loaded with coal or other freight - are being inspected and repaired: leaving railway workshops as Swindon, Crewe, Doncaster and Eastleigh free to build new rolling stock.    
 

 

   
 

Just imagine.  You are standing somewhere in the “six-foot” between the running lines of the Great Northern Railway as it makes its way from Kings Cross towards Scotland through the north London suburb of Finsbury Park.  

 

You are looking west.  One day there will be a steel-and-concrete depot near here filled with Brush and English Electric diesel locomotives – including the mighty Class 55 Deltics.  But this is September 1910.

Frenchman Louis Bleriot having proved that Britain is no longer an island by flying across the English Channel, Sir George White has just delivered Britain's first military aeroplane from his British and Colonial Aeroplane Company at Filton near Bristol.

The Honourable Charles S. Rolls has also just made the first eastbound aeroplane flight across the English Channel as well as the first non-stop double crossing by air. He is also the first British resident to fly across the Channel in a British aeroplane.

Also symbolic of the changing face of Britain and its Empire during the new reign of King George V, Liberal Chancellor of the Exchequer David Lloyd George has laid the foundations for the modern welfare state while popular demand for even greater reforms are indicated by the rise of the new Labour Party and the campaign for women’s suffrage.

1910 has also seen Cheltenham born zoologist Edward Wilson join the Terra Nova expedition of Robert Falcon Scott and sail from Cardiff to Antarctica and ultimately tragedy on the return from the South Pole.

At the Capital Works of Morland and Anderson meanwhile, wagons from railways all over London and beyond - some taken out of traffic while still loaded with coal or other freight - are being inspected and repaired: leaving railway workshops as Swindon, Crewe, Doncaster and Eastleigh free to build new rolling stock.  

As well as 2743 - the habitual Swindon-built half-cab Pannier Tank - an 0-4-0ST crane locomotive waited on the siding to unload a Morris and Griffin flat wagon while another Great Western 0-6-0 tank locomotive shared the shunting. 

633, the first of twelve similar tank engines, was outshopped from Stafford Road, Wolverhampton to Lot M. Among the 633 Class, 633-636 ( works numbers 167-170) and 638-644 ( works numbers 172-178 ) were new build with 637 being converted from a former Rhondda and Swansea Bay Railway 0-6-0T and given the works number 171.

633 was introduced to Paddington depot in November 1871 and withdrawn from there in October 1933 while 635 - as modelled - arrived a month later but only lasted at Paddington until August 1928.

Half the class was similarly to spend most of its life in the London area although other examples served as far away as Frome and Swansea. Several engines - including 633, 634, 641, 642 and 643 - had their 980 gallon tanks fitted with condensing apparatus for working over the Metropolitan Line.

When first built the 633 Class had round topped fireboxes, Wolverhampton designed W3 boilers and bell mouthed chimneys but were rebuilt between 1887 and 1899 with either S2 or S4 boilers before the B4 version with a Belpaire firebox - as depicted on the  model of 635 - became standard. This final version conformed to GWR Diagram A62 with tank capacity reduced to 920 gallons. Although none of the condensing 633 Class ever received cabs, a number of non-condensing locomotives were so equipped..

Keeping a close eye on both me and his kindly loaned kit built model of 635 from across the hall was Ken Haines, Secretary of the Gloucester Model Railway Club.

Founded in the 1950s, Gloucester Model Railway Club meets at Elmscroft Community Centre on Monday evenings from 7.30pm in a club room funded by a legacy from Rev. W. Awdry of "Thomas the Tank Engine" fame.  Indeed, while Ken and fellow club members continued to work on more beautifully detailed models at their desk, children queued to operate the Sodor-inspired Troublesome Trucks layout behind Capital Works which also featured dinosaurs.  Perhaps it was fortunate that TOWIE's Amy Childs decided not to pay a visit!

 
 

 

   
 

633, the first of twelve similar tank engines, was outshopped from Stafford Road, Wolverhampton to Lot M. Among the 633 Class, 633-636 ( works numbers 167-170) and 638-644 ( works numbers 172-178 ) were new build with 637 being converted from a former Rhondda and Swansea Bay Railway 0-6-0T and given the works number 171.

 
 

 

   
  TROUBLESOME TRUCKS

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
 

Troublesome Trucks allows children to operate Thomas trains on a simple circuit of a double loop with passing sidings and a station. With three short tunnels, the conundrum is to work out which tunnel mouth the trains will emerge from next. The scenery on three levels incorporated farmland, a castle and a dinosaur theme park with a dragon breathing fire. The layout was built over six summer weeks using 4mm MDF braced with timber. Card was used to support the elevated tracks and the hill had ply splines filled with crumpled newspaper and covered with Modroc - a thin gauze impregnated with plaster. The locomotives and track are mainly Hornby, controlled by an analogue Gaugemaster Combi unit

 
 

 

   
  Troublesome Trucks allows children to operate Thomas trains on a simple circuit of a double loop with passing sidings and a station. With three short tunnels, the conundrum is to work out which tunnel mouth the trains will emerge from next. The scenery on three levels incorporated farmland, a castle and a dinosaur theme park with a dragon breathing fire. The layout was built over six summer weeks using 4mm MDF braced with timber. Card was used to support the elevated tracks and the hill had ply splines filled with crumpled newspaper and covered with Modroc - a thin gauze impregnated with plaster. The locomotives and track are mainly Hornby, controlled by an analogue Gaugemaster Combi unit  
 

 

   
 

 

CASTLE WHARF KENDAL by Ian Kirkwood

009 Gauge 4mm Scale

 
 

 

   
  Plans for standard gauge light railway running south east from Canal Head in Kendal, Westmorland, to Arkholme, serving various quarries and gunpowder works as well as local farming interests failed due to lack of interest but this 009 layout supposes that the cheaper option of a narrow gauge railway was built instead. Castle Wharf Kendal represents the northern terminus of the line in the 1930s with LMS transfer sidings just south of the area modelled making the canal redundant. Trains to and from the transfer sidings are shunted at the wharf on a track plan very similar to that of the similar narrow gauge tramway at Wantage.  
 

 

   
  Plans for standard gauge light railway running south east from Canal Head in Kendal, Westmorland, to Arkholme, serving various quarries and gunpowder works as well as local farming interests failed due to lack of interest but this 009 layout supposes that the cheaper option of a narrow gauge railway was built instead. Castle Wharf Kendal represents the northern terminus of the line in the 1930s with LMS transfer sidings just south of the area modelled making the canal redundant. Trains to and from the transfer sidings are shunted at the wharf on a track plan very similar to that of the similar narrow gauge tramway at Wantage.

The buildings on Castle Wharf Kendal – based on such real structures as the grey stone K Shoe factory - were hand built from card while the rolling stock was kit built. The locomotives were from the Backwoods range and feature both Barclay and Manning Wardle tank engine as well as a four wheeled diesel from French autorail builder Billiard. 

The Manning Wardle 0-6-2ST pictured below was based on "Canopus" ( 1547 of 1901 ) from Cornwall's 2' 6" gauge Pentewan Railway.  Connecting St Austell to and quarries in the Pentewan valley with a harbour at Pentewan on the outfall of the St Austell River, this was only the third railway to be built in the Royal Duchy and the only true narrow gauge one.  Built with edge rails rather than tram plates, it opened in June 1829 and was initially worked by gravity and horses.  Manning Wardle 0-6-0Ts "Pentewan" and "Trewithan" arrived in 1873 and 1886 with Yorkshire Engine's 2-6-2T "Pioneer" completing the roster in 1903.  However, due to the silting of Pentewan Harbour and competition from Fowey and Par, the Pentewan Railway closed on 29 Janaury 1918 with rolling stock and materials being requisitioned for the war effort. "Canopus" later forked for the War Department in West Drayton.

The 4'x 1'8" layout neatly solved the problem of "90 degree sky" with a curved cyclorama and also boasted a sector plate beneath the cottages for easy handling of trains to and from storage.  Also new for Hucclecote was a goods shed and water tower at the left hand end of the scenic area.

 
 

 

   
 

The buildings on Castle Wharf Kendal – based on such real structures as the grey stone K Shoe factory - were hand built from card while the rolling stock was kit built. The locomotives were from the Backwoods range and feature both Barclays ( pictured above ) and Manning Wardle tank engines ( below ) as well as a diesel from French autorail builder Billiard.

 
 

 

   
  THE BUCC STOPS HERE by Alan Drewett

00 Gauge 4mm Scale
 
 

 

   
 

To mark the 50th anniversary of the first Blackburn Buccaneer entering Royal Navy service, five examples of the World's first under-radar maritime jet bomber will be presented, alongside an production  Inter City 125 diesel multiple unit, celebrating its 35th anniversary in 2011.

 
 

 

   
  Five examples of the World's first under-radar maritime jet bomber were originally presented at St Margaret's Hall, Cheltenham in October 2010 to mark the 50th anniversary of the Blackburn Buccaneer entering Royal Navy service in the same year as the Blue Pullman diesel electric multiple units.  
 

 

   
 

To mark the 50th anniversary of the first Blackburn Buccaneer entering Royal Navy service, five examples of the World's first under-radar maritime jet bomber will be presented, alongside an production  Inter City 125 diesel multiple unit, celebrating its 35th anniversary in 2011.

 
 

 

   
  Alongside a production  Inter City 125 diesel multiple unit, celebrating its 35th anniversary in 2011, this second and last outing for The Bucc Stops Here also showcased the Oxford Die Cast models of a Royal Air Force Land Rover and  "Green Goddess" fire engine.  This latter item was a kind gift from The Mellor Brothers and as well as adding to my fleet of RAF vehicles its main purpose on the diorama was to help stop the perspex front from falling inward if pushed by inquisitive fingers.  
 

 

   
 

 
 

 

   
  However, the Bedford RLHZ Self Propelled Pump, to give the Green Goddess its proper title, has a fascinating history of its own and indeed provided a civil defence counterpoint to the prospective nuclear bombers parked behind it.

Based on the Bedford RL British military truck, the RLHZ was originally issued to the Auxiliary Fire Service in 1953.  The AFS - formed just before World War II - was at that time ready to help municipal fire brigades fight the large number of fires anticipated if Britain was ever attacked by large numbers of atomic weapons.  For this reason the RLHZ - supplied by Bedford in two and four wheel drive versions - was designed to pump water from lakes, rivers, canals and other sources and maintain pressure for other appliances rather than fight fires directly themselves.  In fact a number of Green Goddesses could be plumbed in series to pump water at high pressure through several miles of hose.

Thankfully, no nuclear weapons were ever detonated over Britain but until the AFS was disbanded in 1968 it often used its Self Propelled Pumps to assist local fire fighters at major incidents, especially ones remote from copious water sources.

However, as direct fire fighting was not their primary function, the RLHZs were not equipped with radios, powered cutting equipment or power steering.  They were also relatively slow, with a top speed of 65 mph, did not corner well and, due to the wooden construction of the cabins, did not offer the crew of six much protection in the event of an accident.  Their water capacity - in tanks without slosh baffles - was also limited to 400 gallons or 300 gallons in the case of the 4x4 variants: much less than more modern appliances. 

Despite this, some vehicles were later given warning sirens and blue flashing lights ( as modelled ) and the Green Goddesses were robust and easy to maintain.  They were equipped with 33 feet long extension ladders and also featured a self contained petrol fuelled Coventry Climax pump capable of moving 350 gallons a minute.

After 1968 the Bedford RLZHs were stored and maintained by the armed services and brought out to pump water during floods and droughts or to provide limited cover for Fire Service industrial actions in 1977 and 2002.

Since then though, The Fire and Rescue Services Act of 2004 has given national government the power to instruct local Fire and Rescue Authorities to make their own vehicles available in the event of future strikes and more modern Incident Response Units offer higher power pumping ability as well as other intervention equipment.

As such, most Green Goddesses have been sold with many being exported to Africa.

 
 

 

   
  LONDON TRANSPORT BUSES by Mike Walker

00 Gauge 4mm Scale
 
 

 

   
  Until the 1960s, London Transport built its own distinctive bus bodies at Park Royal in West London.  Chassis were manufactured by AEC at Southall, by Leyland in Lancashire and , during the 1940s, by Guy, Daimler and Bristol.  Mike Walker's collection - which was difficult to photograph in its glass cabinets - focussed on double deck types from 1935 to 2000.  
 

 

   
  Until the 1962, London Transport, the largest bus operator in the World,  built its own distinctive bus bodies at Park Royal in West London with additional bodies being supplied by other body makers from all over Britain to LT's own specifications. 

Chassis were manufactured by AEC at Southall, by Leyland in Lancashire and , during the 1940s, by Guy, Daimler and Bristol.  However, after AEC and Leyland merged in 1962, London's distinctive designs ceased.

Trolley buses had been introduced in the 1930s to replace London's trams although due to the intervention of World War II the trams did not disappear until 1952 and the trolley buses themselves only lasted a decade longer.

Mike Walker's collection - which was difficult to photograph in its glass cabinets - focussed on double deck bus types from 1935 to 2000 and included the following variants.

 
 

 

   
 
STL Produced from 1933 by AEC, the first "modern" bus with the upper deck flush with the radiator.  There were many versions including the Lowbridge.
STD The Leyland version of the STL, also produced in the 1930s.
Q Produced in 1934 by AEC, this experimental design was 25 years ahead of its time with a front entrance and mid-body side engine.  Only the single deck version was produced in quantity.
RT Produced from 1939 by AEC, these were the most common double deckers of the 1950s with 3 702 being made up to 1954.  Three RTs - each purporting to be the fictional RT 1881 ( registration  WLB 991 ) -starred alongside Cliff Richard in the 1962 film "Summer Holiday"
RTL The Leyland version of the RT produced from 1948.
RTW Produced from 1949 by Leyland, this had a body 6" wider than the RTL
RLH A modern lowbridge bus produced by AEC from 1950.
RM Produced from 1958 by AEC to replace the trolley buses, the World famous Routemaster was the last London type with an open rear platform. VLT 196, seen above, was photographed at Fleetwood, Lancashire in 2007.
RML Produced from 1962, this stretched version of the RM lasted for 45 years.
RMF Also produced from 1962, this experimental front entrance RM was AEC's swansong for London Transport.