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RAIL REPORTS 2011

 
 

NORTH WEST FRONTIER

Up the West Coast and back via Manchester



Departure, arrival and changing stations and haulage in bold
 
 STATION  DEPART  NOTES

   

THURSDAY 19 MAY 2011

 
 
 CHELTENHAM  0942
C 18 A
While waiting for  220 005  to take me to Stafford   I noted 66 192 with covered vans and 66 078 with steel coil both northbound while 221 135 (XC) and 158 766 (FGW) headed south.
BROMSGROVE 66 059                                             [ 323 204 KINGS NORTON ]
BIRMINGHAM NEW ST  220 031 350118                           [ 33035 blue livery SOHO ]
WOLVERHAMPTON  390 008 "Virgin King"
 

 

 

 

STAFFORD

1100

1109

221 141 ( above) , 350 129 ( below)                     350 118 to Crewe

At both Stafford and Crewe, connecting trains departed from the arriving platforms, respectively numbers 5 and 11

 

 

 

 

BASFORD HALL YARD 66 543
CREWE

1130

1209

47 843 "Vulcan", 47 853 / D1733 (XP64 livery)   175 112, 221 108 "Sir Ernest Shackleton",          221 112 " Ferdinand Magellan" bound for Chester  350 110, 350 112, 350 255 ( below) ,                   390 011 "City of Lichfield"                                      390 029 "City of Stoke On Trent"                           390 040 "Virgin Pathfinder",                                   390 047 "CLIC Sargeant"

221 104 "Sir John  Franklin" to Oxenholme

 

 

 

 

PRESTON  Due to track circuit issues south of Warrington and subsequent time lost, I stayed on board 221 104 to Oxenholme rather than make the planned 1251 - 1304 stopover at Preston

185 130       [ 185 121 LANCASTER ]   [ 33 030 CARNFORTH ]

CARNFORTH  37 261
OXENHOLME 185 125 haulage to Windermere


SATURDAY 21 MAY 2011



Although I have often been fortunate enough to travel to the Lake District no two visits have been the same - and on this occasion I found myself walking along Buccleuch Dock in Barrow in Furness, near to Morrison's Supermarket.  Although most famous for the nuclear submarines built in the adjacent Devonshire Dock Hall of BAe Systems, Barrow in Furness hosts a wide range of working vessels, the largest and currently longest serving of which has the name Sjaelland painted on its sides and stern.



Although I have often been fortunate enough to travel to the Lake District no two visits have been the same - and on this occasion I found myself walking along  the Town Quay of Buccleuch Dock in Barrow in Furness, near to Morrison's Supermarket.  Although most famous for the nuclear submarines built in the adjacent Devonshire Dock Hall of BAe Systems, Barrow in Furness hosts a wide range of working vessels, the largest and currently longest serving of which has the name Sjaelland painted on its sides and stern.



Built for Danske Statsbaner ( Danish State Railways or DSB ) at Århus , the train and car ferry originally named "Dronning Ingrd" (Queen Ingrid ) began service in April 1951 plying between its registered port of Korsør and Nyborg.  Several changes of Danish inter-island and Danish-Germany routes ensued before the vessel gave up her Royal title in August 1979


Built for Danske Statsbaner ( Danish State Railways or DSB ) at Århus , the train and car ferry originally named "Dronning Ingrd" (Queen Ingrid ) began service in April 1951 plying between its registered port of Korsør and Nyborg.  Several changes of Danish inter-island and Danish-Germany routes ensued before the vessel gave up her Royal title in August 1979



Portraits of the Danish Royal Family remained in the state cabin of the renamed "Sjaelland" however as she plied between Copenhagen and Malmo, Sweden, before becoming the floating set for the Danish TV show "Kaiplads 114" (Berth 114) in 1985.


Portraits of the Danish Royal Family remained in the state cabin of the renamed "Sjaelland" however as she plied between Copenhagen and Malmo, Sweden, before becoming the floating set for the Danish TV show "Kaiplads 114" (Berth 114) in 1985.

In 1988  "Sjaelland" became a museum and restaurant ship and was sold to English interests in April 2002, being moved to Tilbury in Essex and renamed "Selandia". Following purchase by Rick Lucas in June 2004, "Selandia" sailed from Tilbury to Barrow in Furness for a £2 million, nine-month refurbishment. The whole freight deck, was converted to “The Blue Lagoon, a 2 400 capacity nightclub and  while this closed on 16 August 2010 other parts of the ship served as coffee shop, restaurant, casino and bar.  Its propellers were also removed although the engines remained in place.



In 1988  "Sjaelland" became a museum and restaurant ship and was sold to English interests in April 2002, being moved to Tilbury in Essex and renamed "Selandia". Following purchase by Rick Lucas in June 2004, "Selandia" sailed from Tilbury to Barrow in Furness for a £2 million, nine-month refurbishment. The whole freight deck, was converted to “The Blue Lagoon, a 2 500 capacity nightclub and  while this closed on 16 August 2010 other parts of the ship served as coffee shop, restaurant, casino and bar.



Following the scrapping of sister train ferry "Kong Frederik IX" in 2005 there has been interest in Denmark in bringing the "Selandia" home as a ferry museum at Korsor, near Copenhagen, especially since the opening of the 18 Km long fixed link across the Great Belt in 1997.  Despite this impressive structure allowing trains and road vehicles to move between the two great land masses of Denmark however, some ferries still exist on either side of the fixed link in the same way that the train ferries first operated on those waters in 1883 and car-only ferries followed from 1930.


Following the scrapping of sister train ferry "Kong Frederik IX" in 2005 there has been interest in Denmark in bringing the "Selandia" home as a ferry museum, especially since the opening of the 18 Km long fixed link across the Great Belt in 1997.  Despite this impressive structure allowing trains and road vehicles to move between the two great land masses of Denmark however, some ferries still exist on either side of the fixed link in the same way that the train ferries first operated on those waters in 1883 and car-only ferries followed from 1930.



Further along Buccleuch Dock was Norwegian registered pollution control vessel "Husvik Supporter".  Built in 1978, this 290 tonne ship of 35 metres length and 8 metres beam has the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) registration 8741765, Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) number 257656000  and the radio call sign 3YGE.


Further along Buccleuch Dock was Norwegian registered pollution control vessel "Husvik Supporter".  Built in 1978, this 290 tonne ship of 35 metres length and 8 metres beam has the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) registration 8741765, Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) number 257656000  and the radio call sign 3YGE.


Further along Buccleuch Dock was Norwegian registered pollution control vessel "Husvik Supporter".  Built in 1978, this 290 tonne ship of 35 metres length and 8 metres beam has the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) registration 8741765, Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) number 257656000  and the radio call sign 3YGE.


Next on my seaward journey along Buccleuch Dock I encountered two vessels belonging to Danish wind farm and undersea engineering company Hyperbaric Consult, but with the home port of Belize City - capital of Belize, formerly British Honduras - painted on their sterns.


Next on my seaward journey along Buccleuch Dock I encountered two vessels belonging to Danish wind farm and undersea engineering company Hyperbaric Consult, but with the home port of Belize City - capital of Belize, formerly British Honduras - painted on their sterns.

Dive vessel "HBC Supporter" measures 28m x 10m with only 3m draught and IMO number 8741325, MMSI number 312869000 and call sign V3NA4.

"HBC Performer" meanwhile is described by its owners as " a total wind farm support vessel" capable of transferring 12 workers to an offshore installation as well as dive support and tracking undersea cables.  The Caterpillar engined ship also has a suite of hydrophones and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) for unmanned underwater exploration.  "HBC Performer" displaces 120 tonnes and measures 29.8 x 8.85 metres with a draft of 2.65 metres.  Its IMO number is 8986092 and call sign HQWS 6.

 

 

"HBC Performer" meanwhile is described by its owners as " a total wind farm support vessel" capable of transferring 12 workers to an offshore installation as well as dive support and tracking undersea cables.  The Caterpillar engined ship also has a suite of hydrophones and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) for unmanned underwater exploration.  "HBC Performer" displaces 120 tonnes and measures 29.8 x 8.85 metres with a draft of 2.65 metres.  Its IMO number is 8986092 and call sign HQWS 6.


Moored yet further away from Devonshire Dock Hall was Leith registered moorings vessel "Cameron", believed to be on loan to Briggs Marine Contractors of Burntisland, Fife, Scotland from the Ministry of Defence and formerly Rosyth based Royal Fleet Auxilliary A72.  The Moorhen class vessel was noted tending buoys in the Mersey river and estuary in August and September 2010 and was herself built by Richard Dunston of Hessle in 1991. Measuring 33 x 11 meres with a 2 metre draught, the 507 tonnes (gross) "Cameron" is powered by Cummins KT19M diesel engines and has the IMO number 9008495, MMSI 232004102 [UK] and call sign MYEK6.  The crew of 10 can be augmented by five divers or salvage operators for use in salvage lifting or experiment platform mode.
 

 

Moored yet further away from Devonshire Dock Hall was Leith registered moorings vessel "Cameron", believed to be on loan to Briggs Marine Contractors of Burntisland, Fife, Scotland from the Ministry of Defence and formerly Rosyth based Royal Fleet Auxilliary A72.  The Moorhen class vessel was noted tending buoys in the Mersey river and estuary in August and September 2010 and was herself built by Richard Dunston of Hessle in 1991. Measuring 33 x 11 meres with a 2 metre draught, the 507 tonnes (gross) "Cameron" is powered by Cummins KT19M diesel engines and has the IMO number 9008495, MMSI 232004102 [UK] and call sign MYEK6.  The crew of 10 can be augmented by five divers or salvage operators for use in salvage lifting or experiment platform mode.
 

 

Moored yet further away from Devonshire Dock Hall was Leith registered moorings vessel "Cameron", believed to be on loan to Briggs Marine Contractors of Burntisland, Fife, Scotland from the Ministry of Defence and formerly Rosyth based Royal Fleet Auxilliary A72.  The Moorhen class vessel was noted tending buoys in the Mersey river and estuary in August and September 2010 and was herself built by Richard Dunston of Hessle in 1991. Measuring 33 x 11 meres with a 2 metre draught, the 507 tonnes (gross) "Cameron" is powered by Cummins KT19M diesel engines and has the IMO number 9008495, MMSI 232004102 [UK] and call sign MYEK6.  The crew of 10 can be augmented by five divers or salvage operators for use in salvage lifting or experiment platform mode.
 

 

Still manoeuvring into port while I walked along Buccleuch Dock was the 2004 vintage Netherlands flagged tug Amstelstroom, measuring 26 x 9 metres with a 3 metre draught and identified as IMO 9295775 and MMSI 246203000 with the radio call sign PIAS.  Built in Poland but outfitted in the Netherlands, its twin Caterpillar engines gave it a total of 2 228 bhp.
 

 

Still manoeuvring into port while I walked along Buccleuch Dock was the 2004 vintage Netherlands flagged tug Amstelstroom, measuring 26 x 9 metres with a 3 metre draught and identified as IMO 9295775 and MMSI 246203000 with the radio call sign PIAS.  Built in Poland but outfitted in the Netherlands, its twin Caterpillar engines gave it a total of 2 228 bhp.
 

 

Still manoeuvring into port while I walked along Buccleuch Dock was the 2004 vintage Netherlands flagged tug Amstelstroom, measuring 26 x 9 metres with a 3 metre draught and identified as IMO 9295775 and MMSI 246203000 with the radio call sign PIAS.  Built in Poland but outfitted in the Netherlands, its twin Caterpillar engines gave it a total of 2 228 bhp.
 

 

Returning from Barrow in Furness to Windermere by car I had the opportunity to visit the historic and highly picturesque station at Ulverston.  As can be seen from this sequence of pictures of the arrival of 156 490 from Barrow via Roose and Dalton and its departure towards Carnforth and Lancaster, the line retains mechanical signalling and much of the canopy cover and decorative cast ironwork bestowed on it by the Furness Railway, even down to the underpass railings and distinctive red squirrels on the platform benches.  Another unusual feature of Ulverston station was that the through westbound line had platform faces on either side, allowing passengers to embark on and alight from a train on both sides at once.
 

 

Returning from Barrow in Furness to Windermere by car I had the opportunity to visit the historic and highly picturesque station at Ulverston.  As can be seen from this sequence of pictures of the arrival of 156 490 from Barrow via Roose and Dalton and its departure towards Carnforth and Lancaster, the line retains mechanical signalling and much of the canopy cover and decorative cast ironwork bestowed on it by the Furness Railway, even down to the underpass railings and distinctive red squirrels on the platform benches.  Another unusual feature of Ulverston station was that the through westbound line had platform faces on either side, allowing passengers to embark on and alight from a train on both sides at once.
 

 

Returning from Barrow in Furness to Windermere by car I had the opportunity to visit the historic and highly picturesque station at Ulverston.  As can be seen from this sequence of pictures of the arrival of 156 490 from Barrow via Roose and Dalton and its departure towards Carnforth and Lancaster, the line retains mechanical signalling and much of the canopy cover and decorative cast ironwork bestowed on it by the Furness Railway, even down to the underpass railings and distinctive red squirrels on the platform benches.  Another unusual feature of Ulverston station was that the through westbound line had platform faces on either side, allowing passengers to embark on and alight from a train on both sides at once.
 

 

Returning from Barrow in Furness to Windermere by car I had the opportunity to visit the historic and highly picturesque station at Ulverston.  As can be seen from this sequence of pictures of the arrival of 156 490 from Barrow via Roose and Dalton and its departure towards Carnforth and Lancaster, the line retains mechanical signalling and much of the canopy cover and decorative cast ironwork bestowed on it by the Furness Railway, even down to the underpass railings and distinctive red squirrels on the platform benches.  Another unusual feature of Ulverston station was that the through westbound line had platform faces on either side, allowing passengers to embark on and alight from a train on both sides at once.
 

 

Returning from Barrow in Furness to Windermere by car I had the opportunity to visit the historic and highly picturesque station at Ulverston.  As can be seen from this sequence of pictures of the arrival of 156 490 from Barrow via Roose and Dalton and its departure towards Carnforth and Lancaster, the line retains mechanical signalling and much of the canopy cover and decorative cast ironwork bestowed on it by the Furness Railway, even down to the underpass railings and distinctive red squirrels on the platform benches.  Another unusual feature of Ulverston station was that the through westbound line had platform faces on either side, allowing passengers to embark on and alight from a train on both sides at once.
 

 

A plaque on the station building further explained that the Grade II listed structure had been opened in 1874, having been designed by Lancaster architects Paley and Austin as a replacement for an earlier one, located further to the east, opened by the Ulverstone and Lancaster Railway further to the east in 1857.  This through station had in turn replaced the first station in Ulverston, a terminus built by the Furness Railway in 1854.
 

 

A plaque on the station building further explained that the Grade II listed structure had been opened in 1874, having been designed by Lancaster architects Paley and Austin as a replacement for an earlier one, located further to the east, opened by the Ulverstone and Lancaster Railway further to the east in 1857.  This through station had in turn replaced the first station in Ulverston, a terminus built by the Furness Railway in 1854.
 

 

Derived from the Great Seal of Furness Abbey, the Furness Railway coat of arms  depicts the Virgin Mary holding the infant Jesus in her left hand, whilst in her right hand she carries an orb, symbolising the world. She stands beneath the centre of three pointed arches and is flanked by two shields, each supported by a monk. Each shield is surmounted by sprigs of deadly nightshade, symbolising the valley in which Furness Abbey is built.
 

 

Incorporated on 23 May 1844 and officially opened on 12 August 1846, the Furness Railway became one of the most prosperous in England after the discovery of large deposits of haematite at Park, north of Barrow, in 1850.  The Ulverstone ( sic) and Lancaster Railway meanwhile was authorised on 24 July 1851 and its 19 1/2 mile single line to Carnforth opened to passengers on 1 September 1857.  Its purchase by the Furness Railway became effective from 21 January 1862.

The Furness Railway avoided sale to the Midland Railway during the depression of 1875 by changing emphasis from goods to tourism and by 1918 owned 428 3/4 miles of track including sidings.  It eventually became part of the LMS in 1923.

Derived from the Great Seal of Furness Abbey, the Furness Railway coat of arms  depicts the Virgin Mary holding the infant Jesus in her left hand, whilst in her right hand she carries an orb, symbolising the world. She stands beneath the centre of three pointed arches and is flanked by two shields, each supported by a monk. Each shield is surmounted by sprigs of deadly nightshade, symbolising the valley in which Furness Abbey is built.

The right-hand shield bears the three lions of England, that on the left is charged with those of Lancaster, and in the lower compartment is the figure of a Wyvern, a mythical creature taking the form of a two-legged dragon.

The Furness Railway name is shown in the upper half of the button, and the lower half bears the motto "Cavendo Tutus", meaning "Secure by Caution". This was also the motto of the Cavendish family, the local Lords of the Manor, whose head was a valuable sponsor of the Furness Railway in its early years.

 

 

In contrast to the Furness railway, the coat of arms of Ulverston, seen on the diamond shaped companion plaque, were granted as recently as 1 December 1955.  The shield expresses the ecclesiastical and manorial connections of the town and the red bars on white are part of the arms of the de Lancasters, Barons of Kendal and holders of Ulverston and Furness Abbey. The crosiers refer to the Abbey and to Conishead Priory, the black portion fretted with white is from the Harrington arms while the anchor and fleurs-de-lys are from the arms of the Barrow family. The anchor also occurs in the arms of the Gale-Braddylls of Conishead and is a reference to the former Port of Ulverston. The fleur-de-lys and their blue background also appear in the arms of the Dukes of Buccleuch, to whom the Manor descended.   The red roses are for Lancashire, the town having formerly been in that county, and the black wolf refers to name of the town "Wulf-heres-tun". The other emblems are for local industries; the agricultural market is symbolised by the gold sheaf, the flames are for the formerly important iron-smelting, the leather collar represents the tanning industry, the chain hanging from it is for the engineering industry, and supports a gold shield carrying a red lightning flash for the electrical industry and the Egyptian Ankh or Cross of Life, in green, for the anti-biotic manufacturing activities. The motto - OPTIMUM SUFFICIT, Only the Best Is Good Enough -  is based on that of the Barrow family 'PARUM SUFFICIT' - a little is enough.
 

 

In contrast to the Furness railway, the coat of arms of Ulverston, seen on the diamond shaped companion plaque, were granted as recently as 1 December 1955.  The shield expresses the ecclesiastical and manorial connections of the town and the red bars on white are part of the arms of the de Lancasters, Barons of Kendal and holders of Ulverston and Furness Abbey. The crosiers refer to the Abbey and to Conishead Priory, the black portion fretted with white is from the Harrington arms while the anchor and fleurs-de-lys are from the arms of the Barrow family. The anchor also occurs in the arms of the Gale-Braddylls of Conishead and is a reference to the former Port of Ulverston. The fleur-de-lys and their blue background also appear in the arms of the Dukes of Buccleuch, to whom the Manor descended.   The red roses are for Lancashire, the town having formerly been in that county, and the black wolf refers to name of the town "Wulf-heres-tun". The other emblems are for local industries; the agricultural market is symbolised by the gold sheaf, the flames are for the formerly important iron-smelting, the leather collar represents the tanning industry, the chain hanging from it is for the engineering industry, and supports a gold shield carrying a red lightning flash for the electrical industry and the Egyptian Ankh or Cross of Life, in green, for the anti-biotic manufacturing activities. The motto - OPTIMUM SUFFICIT, Only the Best Is Good Enough -  is based on that of the Barrow family 'PARUM SUFFICIT' - a little is enough.
 

 

In contrast to the Furness railway, the coat of arms of Ulverston, seen on the diamond shaped companion plaque, were granted as recently as 1 December 1955.  The shield expresses the ecclesiastical and manorial connections of the town and the red bars on white are part of the arms of the de Lancasters, Barons of Kendal and holders of Ulverston and Furness Abbey. The crosiers refer to the Abbey and to Conishead Priory, the black portion fretted with white is from the Harrington arms while the anchor and fleurs-de-lys are from the arms of the Barrow family. The anchor also occurs in the arms of the Gale-Braddylls of Conishead and is a reference to the former Port of Ulverston. The fleur-de-lys and their blue background also appear in the arms of the Dukes of Buccleuch, to whom the Manor descended.   The red roses are for Lancashire, the town having formerly been in that county, and the black wolf refers to name of the town "Wulf-heres-tun". The other emblems are for local industries; the agricultural market is symbolised by the gold sheaf, the flames are for the formerly important iron-smelting, the leather collar represents the tanning industry, the chain hanging from it is for the engineering industry, and supports a gold shield carrying a red lightning flash for the electrical industry and the Egyptian Ankh or Cross of Life, in green, for the anti-biotic manufacturing activities. The motto - OPTIMUM SUFFICIT, Only the Best Is Good Enough -  is based on that of the Barrow family 'PARUM SUFFICIT' - a little is enough.
 

 

Had the Ulverston coat of arms been awarded a few decades later, perhaps the wolf might have been holding a length of 35mm film in its paws and wearing a bowler hat, but on Sunday 19 April 2009 veteran comedian Ken Dodd honoured Stan Laurel - born in Argyll Street, Ulverston in June 1890 - and his larger-boned American comedy partner Oliver Hardy by unveiling statues of them outside the Coronation Hall theatre.  In a partnership lasting 31 years, Laurel & Hardy made 106 films from the silent era until the 1950s and the sculptor Graham Ibbeson was also responsible for the Eric Morecambe statue in Morecambe.
 

 

Had the Ulverston coat of arms been awarded a few decades later, perhaps the wolf might have been holding a length of 35mm film in its paws and wearing a bowler hat, but on Sunday 19 April 2009 veteran comedian Ken Dodd honoured Stan Laurel - born in Argyll Street, Ulverston in June 1890 - and his larger-boned American comedy partner Oliver Hardy by unveiling statues of them outside the Coronation Hall theatre.  In a partnership lasting 31 years, Laurel & Hardy made 106 films from the silent era until the 1950s while sculptor Graham Ibbeson was also responsible for the Eric Morecambe statue in Morecambe.
 

 

Moving from one L&H to another, the Lakeside & Haverthwaite Railway yielded the sight of not one but two large Fairburn tank engines.  Static 42073 - pictured above - was discussed in Rail Reports 2010 while sister locomotive 42085 - bearing 51A Darlington shedplates and also built at Brighton - brought in a train from Lakeside, had its side tanks filled in the rain and then ran round its four carmine and cream carriages for another journey: all very atmospheric but not good weather for digital cameras! In earlier preservation days 42085 ran on the L&HR in a fictional Caledonian blue livery and 42073 in an equally inaccurate LNWR Blackberry black but both locomotives are now back in the smart but workmanlike BR lined black.
 

 

Moving from one L&H to another, the Lakeside & Haverthwaite Railway yielded the sight of not one but two large Fairburn tank engines.  Static 42073 - pictured above - was discussed in Rail Reports 2010 while sister locomotive 42085 - bearing 51A Darlington shedplates and also built at Brighton - brought in a train from Lakeside, had its side tanks filled in the rain and then ran round its four carmine and cream carriages for another journey: all very atmospheric but not good weather for digital cameras! In earlier preservation days 42085 ran on the L&HR in a fictional Caledonian blue livery and 42073 in an equally inaccurate LNWR Blackberry black but both locomotives are now back in the smart but workmanlike BR lined black.
 

 

Moving from one L&H to another, the Lakeside & Haverthwaite Railway yielded the sight of not one but two large Fairburn tank engines.  Static 42073 - pictured above - was discussed in Rail Reports 2010 while sister locomotive 42085 - bearing 51A Darlington shedplates and also built at Brighton - brought in a train from Lakeside, had its side tanks filled in the rain and then ran round its four carmine and cream carriages for another journey: all very atmospheric but not good weather for digital cameras! In earlier preservation days 42085 ran on the L&HR in a fictional Caledonian blue livery and 42073 in an equally inaccurate LNWR Blackberry black but both locomotives are now back in the smart but workmanlike BR lined black.
 

 

Among the locomotives found in the more clement conditions of the shed meanwhile were Birmingham RCW built Class 27 D5370 - renumbered as 27 024 in April 1974 - and English Electric's 20 214, formerly D8314.

The Type 2 Bo-Bo was given BRCW's works number DEl213 and in January 1962 joined 51L Thornaby depot before gravitating to Scotland along with the rest of the class and being withdrawn at Edinburgh Haymarket in June 1987.  However, it survived partly due to being taken into departmental stock as 968028.

The single cab Type 1 Bo-Bo carried the English Electric / Vulcan Works numbers D3695/ D1090 and was also first allocated to Thornaby in May 1967 before TOPS renumbering, again in April 1974.  As one of the last Class 20s, D8312 was outshopped from Newton Le Willows with a four digit indicator box instead of the older discs and as such make as interesting comparison with D8195 as seen on Nearly Feltham.

 

 

Among the locomotives found in the more clement conditions of the shed meanwhile were Birmingham RCW built Class 27 D5370 - renumbered as 27 024 in April 1974 - and English Electric's 20 214, formerly D8314.
 

 

SUNDAY 22 MAY 2011

 

 

An unexpected evening journey along the Windermere branch to bid farewell to my host saw me add  185 147 to my haulage tally for this trip as well as giving  the chance to catch 185 101 and 185 123 heading south toward Manchester reflecting on the side of northbound 490 039 "Virgin Quest" at Oxenholme.
 

 

An unexpected evening journey along the Windermere branch to bid farewell to my host saw me add  185 147 to my haulage tally for this trip as well as giving  the chance to catch 185 101 and 185 123 heading south toward Manchester reflecting on the side of northbound 490 039 "Virgin Quest".

 


MONDAY 23 MAY 2011

 
 
 WINDERMERE 1049

C02A

 185 122 to Manchester Piccadilly
OXENHOLME 390 018 "Virgin Princess"
MANCHESTER PICCADILLY  1227
1307
C 22 A
While waiting for 220 015 to take me to Cheltenham I noted 158 863 (East Midlands trains ) 323 231,     390 009 "Treaty of Union",                                         390 036 "City of Coventry"
 

 

 

 

STOCKPORT  323 228 [ 323 224 MACCLESFIELD ]
WOLVERHAMPTON   390 040 "Virgin Star"  [ 66 103 LOW LEVEL ] [ 170 511 SOHO]
BIRMINGHAM NEW ST   350 118 [ KINGS NORTON Plasser & Theurer 73923 "Mercury" ]
 
 

 

   
 

THE GREY VIRGINS

Railway designer labels

 
     
   

THURSDAY 8 SEPTEMBER 2011

 
     
  CHELTENHAM

0942

C4A

While waiting for 220 028 to take me to Manchester Piccadilly I noted 150 126 ( Forming FGW service to Westbury but painted in white blue and green horizontal stripes with no logos ) 150 261 ( bound for Swindon ) and 172 338 ( London Midland, under trials running north )  
  BIRMINGHAM NEW ST    323 221 [ 323 203 WOLVERHAMPTON ]  
 

 

   
 

I took Greater Manchester Metrolink tram 3011 back from St Peter's Place to Piccadilly ( 1021 pictured above at the tram platforms below the lawn at Piccadilly ) before observing 150 274, 156 423, 185 107, 185 129 ( first and third dhmus bound for Liverpool Lime Street).  Also noted on the terminal platforms were 390 036 "City of Coventry" and 390 004 "Alstom Pendolino", the latter being decorated with Alstom publicising grey vinyls.  Both emus are pictured below.

 
 

 

   
  MANCHESTER PICCADILLY

1159

1416

C56A

I took Greater Manchester Metrolink tram 3011 back from St Peter's Place to Piccadilly ( 1021 pictured above at the tram platforms below the lawn at Piccadilly ) before observing 150 274, 156 423, 185 107, 185 129 ( first and third dhmus bound for Liverpool Lime Street).  Also noted on the terminal platforms were 390 036 "City of Coventry" and 390 004 "Alstom Pendolino" ( formerly "Virgin Scot"), the latter having been unveiled with Alstom publicising grey vinyls, new name and new track and pantograph monitoring equipment at Euston on 16 September 2010.  Both emus are pictured below.

Haulage aboard 185 134, ostensibly bound for Edinburgh and due to leave me at OXENHOLME at 1528

 
 

 

   
 

 
 

 

   
 

 
 

 

   
 

The arms of the City of Coventry were granted by King Edward III in 1345 with the present heraldic device, granted by Queen Elizabeth II on 10 February 1959, being identical but with the addition of supporting Black Eagle of Leofric - husband of Lady Godiva - and a Phoenix rising from the flames and destruction of Second World War bombing just like the new Coventry Cathedral.

 
 

 

   
  The arms of the City of Coventry were granted by King Edward III in 1345 with the present heraldic device, granted by Queen Elizabeth II on 10 February 1959, being identical but with the addition of supporting Black Eagle of Leofric - husband of Lady Godiva - and a Phoenix rising from the flames and destruction of Second World War bombing just like the new Coventry Cathedral.

The motto "Camera Principis" (the Prince's Chamber) refers to Edward, the Black Prince, as the Manor of Cheylesmore at Coventry was at one time owned by his grandmother, Queen Isabella, and eventually passed to him.

The wild cat, or cat-a-mountain, standing on the closed-visor esquire represents watchfulness and the red and green colours have been associated with Coventry since 1441 although Coventry City Football Club are known as the Sky Blues.

Most interestingly, the elephant is depicted not only as a beast so strong that he can carry Coventry's castle full of armed men but also as a symbol of Christ's redemption of the human race and as a dragon slayer in Medieval thinking.  Indeed, the early seals of Coventry show an elephant and castle on one side and combat between Archangel Michael and the dragon - or Devil - on the other: an image reflected in the Jacob Epstein sculpture of St Michael and Satan on the Coventry Cathedral of 1962.

 
 

 

   
 

I took Greater Manchester Metrolink tram 3011 back from St Peter's Place to Piccadilly ( 1021 pictured above at the tram platforms below the lawn at Piccadilly ) before observing 150 274, 156 423, 185 107, 185 129 ( first and third dhmus bound for Liverpool Lime Street).  Also noted on the terminal platforms were 390 036 "City of Coventry" and 390 004 "Alstom Pendolino", the latter being decorated with Alstom publicising grey vinyls.  Both emus are pictured below.

 
 

 

   
 

I took Greater Manchester Metrolink tram 3011 back from St Peter's Place to Piccadilly ( 1021 pictured above at the tram platforms below the lawn at Piccadilly ) before observing 150 274, 156 423, 185 107, 185 129 ( first and third dhmus bound for Liverpool Lime Street).  Also noted on the terminal platforms were 390 036 "City of Coventry" and 390 004 "Alstom Pendolino", the latter being decorated with Alstom publicising grey vinyls.  Both emus are pictured below.

 
 

 

   
 

I took Greater Manchester Metrolink tram 3011 back from St Peter's Place to Piccadilly ( 1021 pictured above at the tram platforms below the lawn at Piccadilly ) before observing 150 274, 156 423, 185 107, 185 129 ( first and third dhmus bound for Liverpool Lime Street).  Also noted on the terminal platforms were 390 036 "City of Coventry" and 390 004 "Alstom Pendolino", the latter being decorated with Alstom publicising grey vinyls.  Both emus are pictured below.

 
 

 

   
  PRESTON Due to a rear windscreen wiper malfunction on the West Coast Main Line, 185 134 came to a halt at Platform 4 of Preston station, just south of 185 120 into which all passengers transferred and attempted to find their equivalent seats, having taken their reservation cards with them.  
  LANCASTER 153 318, 156 451 [ 33 030 CARNFORTH]  
  OXENHOLME

1538

Despite late running due to the unexpected change at Preston I still managed to catch the Class 185 to WINDERMERE, arriving at 1559  
     
 

FRIDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 2011

 
     
  WINDERMERE

1815

185 128 taken to view Kendal Torchlight Parade which featured a Muir Hill tractor and Nissan Figaro saloon with rear window removed.  
  KENDAL

2224

185 118, which had been running on the branch previously, taken back to WINDERMERE.  
     
 

SATURDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2011

 
     
  WINDERMERE   185 120  [ 153 331, 153 378 LANCASTER ]  
  PRESTON   185 128 to BLACKPOOL NORTH  [156 429 KIRKHAM]  
 

 

   
 

A spell of good weather on Blackpool Promenade allowed me to stand near the Merrie England bar on North Pier and look south towards Pleasure Beach to take these pictures of double deck trams 147 "Michael Airey"( built in 1924 ) , 711  in Blackpool Zoo overall advertising, 724 similarly liveried in blue for the Lyndene Hotel and 707 marked for Coral Island.  Of the three English Electric built  "Balloon" double deckers photographed, 707 and 724 are two of four Millennium Class A1-1A vehicles with new flat fronts and air conditioned cabs.

 
 

 

   
  A spell of good weather on Blackpool Promenade allowed me to stand near the Merrie England bar on North Pier and look south towards Pleasure Beach to take these pictures of double deck trams 147 "Michael Airey"( built in 1924 ) , 711  in Blackpool Zoo overall advertising, 724 similarly liveried in blue for the Lyndene Hotel and 707 marked for Coral Island.  Of the three 1934 vintage formerly open top English Electric built  "Balloon" double deckers photographed, 707 and 724 are two of four Millennium Class A1-1A vehicles with new flat fronts and air conditioned cabs.  
 

 

   
  A spell of good weather on Blackpool Promenade allowed me to stand near the Merrie England bar on North Pier and look south towards Pleasure Beach to take these pictures of double deck trams 147 "Michael Airey"( built in 1924 ) , 711  in Blackpool Zoo overall advertising, 724 similarly liveried in blue for the Lyndene Hotel and 707 marked for Coral Island.  Of the three English Electric built  "Balloon" double deckers photographed, 707 and 724 are two of four Millennium Class A1-1A vehicles with new flat fronts and air conditioned cabs.  
 

 

   
  147 was withdrawn in 1967 and exported to Columbia Park, Ohio, USA only to return in 2000 in exchange for an open boat tram car.  The traditional double decker was named "Michael Airey" on 20 July 2006 after the now-retired Blackpool Transport body shop manager who had been instrumental in preparing 147 for its return home and managed its subsequent restoration.  
 

 

   
 

A spell of good weather on Blackpool Promenade allowed me to stand near the Merrie England bar on North Pier and look south towards Pleasure Beach to take these pictures of double deck trams 147 "Michael Airey"( built in 1924 ) , 711  in Blackpool Zoo overall advertising, 724 similarly liveried in blue for the Lyndene Hotel and 707 marked for Coral Island.  Of the three English Electric built  "Balloon" double deckers photographed, 707 and 724 are two of four Millennium Class A1-1A vehicles with new flat fronts and air conditioned cabs.

 
 

 

   
 

SUNDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 2011

 
 

 

   
 

Noted on leaving Blackpool North was 142 014, whose Driving Motor Second 55555 is the only second generation diesel hydraulic multiple unit vehicle with a five digit identity made of the same number.  As was to be seen on Monday at Manchester Piccadilly, the Northern train operating company now specifically mentions that it is a Serco and Abellio ( Nederland Spoorwegen ) joint venture on its rolling stock.

 
 

 

   
  Noted on leaving Blackpool North was 142 014, whose Driving Motor Second 55555 is the only second generation diesel hydraulic multiple unit vehicle with a five digit identity made of the same number.  As was to be seen on Monday at Manchester Piccadilly, the Northern train operating company now specifically mentions that it is a Serco and Abellio ( Nederland Spoorwegen ) joint venture on its rolling stock.  
 

 

   
 

Noted on leaving Blackpool North was 142 014, whose Driving Motor Second 55555 is the only second generation diesel hydraulic multiple unit vehicle with a five digit identity made of the same number.  As was to be seen on Monday at Manchester Piccadilly, the Northern train operating company now specifically mentions that it is a Serco and Abellio ( Nederland Spoorwegen ) joint venture on its rolling stock.

 
 

 

   
  BLACKPOOL NORTH   150 225    150 149, 156 449, 156 471, 185 124  
  PRESTON   185 136 to LANCASTER  57 307 "Lady Penelope"  
  LANCASTER Before visiting Lancaster Castle during Heritage Open Days I took time to inspect 221 115 "Polmadie Depot", pictured below.  
 

 

   
 

In its original guise as "Sir Francis Chichester", 221 115 was pictured in Gloucestershire Transport History's article "Terminal 1 and Voyager DEMUs"  and was, as mentioned, one of 44 tilting Super Voyager sets built for Virgin Trains.  Of these 44 sets, numbers 221 101 to 221 140 were five car units comprising Driving Motor Standard, Motor Standard Restaurant  Buffet, two Motor Standard vehicles and a Driving Motor First.

 
 

 

   
  In fact these photographs were taken almost exactly ten years after I first had a proper look at a Bombardier Voyager - 220 009, also in Virgin markings - at Preston, just hours before I heard the news about the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon in the USA.  Given the fearful mood of mid September 2001 I personally rejoice that the world as we know it is still here, and 221 115 also yields some clues to the way that Virgin passenger trains have developed during the last decade.

In its original guise as "Sir Francis Chichester", 221 115 was pictured in Gloucestershire Transport History's article "Terminal 1 and Voyager DEMUs"  and was, as mentioned, one of 44 tilting Super Voyager sets built for Virgin Trains.  Of these 44 sets, numbers 221 101 to 221 140 were five car units comprising Driving Motor Standard, Motor Standard Restaurant  Buffet, two Motor Standard vehicles and a Driving Motor First.

However, four sets - numbered 221 141 to 221 144 - were introduced as four car units, lacking one of the Motor Second vehicles described above.  The names applied to these four-car sets were 221 141"Amerigo Vespucci", 221 142 "Mathew Flinders", 221 143 "Auguste Picard" and 221 144 "Prince Madoc".

 
 

 

   
  However, four sets - numbered 221 141 to 221 144 - were introduced as four car units, lacking one of the Motor Second vehicles described above.  The names applied to these four-car sets were 221 141"Amerigo Vespucci", 221 142 "Mathew Flinders", 221 143 "Auguste Picard" and 221 144 "Prince Madoc".  
 

 

   
  From 8 December 2007 the Cross Country train operating franchise was taken over by Arriva along with a number of Super Voyagers which were de-named in the table below

 

221 101 Louis Bleriot 221 123  
221 102 John Cabot 221 124  
221 103 Christopher Columbus 221 125  
221 104 Sir John Franklin 221 126  
221 105 William Baffin 221 127  
221 106 Willem Barents 221 128  
221 107 Sir Martin Frobisher 221 129  
221 108 Sir Ernest Shackleton 221 130  
221 109 Marco Polo 221 131  
221 110 James Cook 221 132  
221 111 Roald Amudsen 221 133  
221 112 Ferdinand Magellan 221 134  
221 113 Sir Walter Raleigh 221 135  
221 114   221 136  
221 115   221 137  
221 116   221 138  
221 117   221 139  
221 118   221 140  
221 119   221 141  
221 120   221 142 Mathew Flinders
221 121   221 143 Auguste Picard
221 122   221 144 Prince Madoc
 
 

 

   
 

By 2010 five of its former five-car sets - numbered 221 114 to 221 118 - had reverted to Virgin West Coast use although their former names were not re-applied.  However, in September 2011 it was decided to name 221 115 "Polmadie Depot" and apply manufacturer themed vinyls with the legend " More trains..fewer cars..greener planet", words debated grammatically in some quarters!

 
 

 

   
  By 2010 five of its former five-car sets - numbered 221 114 to 221 118 - had reverted to Virgin West Coast use although their former names were not re-applied.  However, in September 2011 it was decided to name 221 115 "Polmadie Depot" and apply manufacturer themed vinyls with the legend " More trains..fewer cars..greener planet", words debated grammatically in some quarters!

 In 2010 Virgin West Coast set 221 144 "Prince Madoc" was named "Bombardier Voyager", a name applied to non-tilting Voyager 220 017 before 2007, although in 2011 a decision was made to disband 221 144.  This allowed Driving Motor Standard 60394 and Driving Motor First 60494 to become spares - with the ability to form a power twin 2 car set - and the Motor Standard Restaurant  Buffet and  Motor Standard vehicles to be respectively added to remaining Virgin West Coast four-car sets 221 142 and 221 143. 

This however would have left set 221 142 with two MSRMBs, one named "Mathew Flinders" and the other named "Bombardier Voyager" so the former name was dropped.

 
 

 

   
 

In 2010 Virgin West Coast set 221 144 "Prince Madoc" was named "Bombardier Voyager", a name applied to non-tilting Voyager 220 017 before 2007, although in 2011 a decision was made to disband 221 144.  This allowed Driving Motor Standard 60394 and Driving Motor First 60494 to become spares - with the ability to form a power twin 2 car set - and the Motor Standard Restaurant  Buffet and  Motor Standard vehicles to be respectively added to remaining Virgin West Coast four-car sets 221 142 and 221 143.

 
 

 

   
     
 

MONDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2011

 
     
  WINDERMERE 1049

C37A

185 116   
  OXENHOLME   221 111 "Roald Amudsen" London bound  
  PRESTON   Plasser & Theurer tamper DR 73904 "Thomas Telford"  
  MANCHESTER PICCADILLY 1227    
  MANCHESTER PICCADILLY 1307

C20A

While waiting for 220 034 to take me back to CHELTENHAM I noted 150 205, 150 272, 156 444,       156 455, 156 491, 185 105, 185 114, 185 126, 323 224, 323 227, 390 010 "A Decade of Progress" ,                        390 043 "Virgin Explorer", 390 048 "Virgin Harrier",        390 051 "Virgin Ambassador"  
  LONGSIGHT   390 035 "City of Lancaster"  
     
  Due to a train already further south at Cheadle Hulme failing to proceed, 220 034 was routed via Burnage, Heald Green, Styal and Wilmslow to Crewe.  
     
  CREWE 66 415, 220 027, 323 229, 350 119  
  WOLVERHAMPTON 170 502, 323 203, 390 029 "City of Stoke on Trent"  
  SOHO 08 805, 350 120  
  BIRMINGHAM NEW ST 220 030, 390 038 "City of London" noted before departure via the Camp Hill line  
  KINGS NORTON 170 108  
  CHELTENHAM 1523