Cheltenham GWR Modellers April 2015 Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargeant

A profile of CLIC Sargeant as a charity and reviews of past Cheltenham GWR Modellers shows can be found at

http://glostransporthistory.visit-gloucestershire.co.uk/wordpresscheltenhGWRCLIC.htm

while once again model railway enthusiasts from all over Gloucestershire travelled to the Cheltenham GWR Modellers April 2015 Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargent  at St Margaret’s Hall, Coniston Road, Cheltenham, GL51 3NX on Saturday and Sunday 11 and 12 April 2015 for the following attractions:

GOONHILLY by Stephen Rogerson       Andover MRC

0 Gauge  7mm Scale

Goonhilly was a small GWR terminus in Cornwall on an imaginary branch from Helston to Goonhilly. The track was by Peco and the structures scratchbuilt or modified from kits. Operation was by a cassette hidden behind the wall next to the locomotive depot.Goonhilly was a small GWR terminus in Cornwall on an imaginary – if at one time proposed -branch from Helston to Goonhilly.  In real life the Great Western Railway did build a branch south from the now-closed junction at Gwinear Road between Camborne and Hayle on the main line to Penzance but this only ran as far as Helston via Praze, Nancecollan and Truthall Platform.

From Helston to the head of the Lizard Peninsula, the Great Western Railway introduced a road motor bus service in 1903 and became the first British railway to operate a service of this kind successfully. In the 1960s, Goonhilly became even better known as the location of the General Post Office's satellite earth station, chosen for its super stable granite bedrock and location at one of the most southerly points in Britain. A fuller appreciation of this installation can be found in The Telstar Story on this website.From Helston to the head of the Lizard Peninsula, the Great Western Railway introduced a road motor bus service in 1903 and became the first British railway to operate a service of this kind successfully.  In the 1960s, Goonhilly became even better known as the location of the General Post Office’s satellite earth station, chosen for its super stable granite bedrock and location at one of the most southerly points in Britain.  A fuller appreciation of this installation can be found in The Telstar Story on this website.

Great Western 0-4-0ST 701 pictured above was built by Andrew Barclays of Kilmarnock as works number 1045 of 1905 and was delivered to the Swansea Harbour Trust as their fleet number 5.  On being acquired by the GWR it became 701 and was renumbered 1140 by British Railways before being scrapped in 1958.

Also on the motive power roster was 0-6-0T 784, built as Hudswell Clarke 344 of 1890 and formerly Barry Railway E Class number 51.  In reality this locomotive spent most of its life in Barry and was withdrawn by British Railways in August 1949.

Meanwhile, North’s Navigation Collieries of Bridgend acquired a number of coal wagons from the Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company Limited.  Fleet number 184 was outshopped in April 1891 while 12 ton capacity wagon 3000 left Bristol Road in December 1911.

The track on the layout was by Peco and the structures scratchbuilt or modified from kits.  Operation was by a cassette hidden behind the wall next to the locomotive depot.

REDWOOD by Steve Adcock 

0n30 Gauge  7mm Scale

 The fictional City of Redwood is located in the forests of northern California. Today it has a population of 651 souls and was established in 1855 by rough tough lumber men. It still relies heavily on the exploitation of the ancient forests for most of its income and employment but in recent years the increasingly wealthy and mobile population of the San Francisco conurbation has been arriving - mostly by train - to enjoy the massive trees and fresh woodland air.The fictional City of Redwood is located in the forests of northern California.  Today it has a population of 651 souls and was established in 1855 by rough tough lumber men.  It still relies heavily on the exploitation of the ancient forests for most of its income and employment but in recent years the increasingly wealthy and mobile population of the San Francisco conurbation has been arriving – mostly by train – to enjoy the massive trees and fresh woodland air.

Steve’s layout was set in 1940, just before the United States entered the Second World War.  Much of Northern California and Southern Oregon was still covered in virgin forest, some of which comprised Sequoia Sempervirens, but the economy was booming with improved transport links for tourism and freight alike.

The Redwood Railway was, however, still primarily a lumber carrier from the area surrounding the town of Redwood.  To the east trains ran through Whiskey Springs and Northspur down to the interchange with the Southern Pacific at Willits, a distance of 21 miles.  To the west the railroad ran 2 miles down to the Baja Humbug harbour, where unprocessed wood was shipped by sea.

Redwood passenger trains were timed at Willits to meet the hourly service that ran from Oakland up to Eureka.  Often at weekends and holidays extra trains were laid on, being timetabled around increasing numbers of coal, livestock and mixed goods trains.

Due to the mountainous terrain and steep gradients, the Chief Engineer of the line, Abe Simpson, had no choice but to use narrow gauge tracks. It took four years for him and his team of Chinese navvies to forge the permanent way through the forests. The depot building and trees around it were scratchbuilt, road vehicles were by Corgi and rolling stock mostly modified Bachmann with a few scratchbuilt engines running on H0 chassis. Track and points were Peco standard 0n30, scenic material by Woodland and stone and ballast by Merehead.Due to the mountainous terrain and steep gradients, the Chief Engineer of the line, Abe Simpson, had no choice but to use narrow gauge tracks.  It took four years for him and his team of Chinese navvies to forge the permanent way through the forests.  The depot building and trees around it were scratchbuilt, road vehicles were by Corgi and rolling stock mostly modified Bachmann with a few scratchbuilt engines running on H0 chassis.  Track and points were Peco standard 0n30, scenic material by Woodland and stone and ballast by Merehead.

DEVONPORT ROAD by John Anderson

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

As the name suggests, Devonport Road was based in the suburbs of Plymouth. The station was the junction of the Southern Railway withered arm into Plymouth and the Great Western branch to Cattewater, the two lines running parallel for a distance to the east of the station, until the Southern diverged into Friary and the Great Western continued to Laira Junction.As the name suggests, the fictional Devonport Road was based in the suburbs of Plymouth.  The station was the junction of the Southern Railway’s western withered arm into Plymouth and the Great Western – as opposed to real life Southern – branch to Cattewater, the two lines running parallel for a distance to the east of the station, until the Southern diverged into Friary and the Great Western continued to Laira Junction.

The layout showed a vision of the early 1990s with the Great Western branch now just a freight only line serving a number of industries in the Cattewater area – including fuel oil, bitumen, industrial gases, chemicals, coal and scrap metal.  The Great Western platforms had by now been converted into a parcels station for handling sorted and high security mail and parcels.  The short loops on the layout ( based on those at Pylle Hill in Bristol ) were used to quickly marshal parcels vans after loading and unloading for tripping around to the visually similar North Road station.  The sidings to the front of the layout were for the civil engineers and featured all manner of engineering and departmental wagons.

The former Southern Railway “withered arm” lines were now cut back to Gunnislake, but trains to the Ministry of Defence armaments depot at Ernesettle – just north of Brunel’s Royal Albert Bridge – pass through the station, as do china clay trains to the plant just south of Bere Ferrers.  A strong preservation movement has also set up at the junction station of Bere Alston.  Trains of preserved stock are sometimes seen passing Devonport Road.

Plymouth is famous for its naval dockyards at Devonport, home to many of the Royal Navy's surface and subsurface vessels. The "secret" trains to support the submarine fleet are regularly seen at Devonport Road, along with other general stores traffic. The dockyards have however branched out and also use their facilities to repair, repaint and modify a number of railway vehicles including coaches and HST power cars. These vehicles added to the mix of traffic passing through.Plymouth is famous for its naval dockyards at Devonport, home to many of the Royal Navy’s surface and subsurface vessels.  The “secret” trains to support the submarine fleet are regularly seen at Devonport Road, along with other general stores traffic.  Of particular interest was this meeting of a green FNA wagon – familiar to Gloucestershire rail fans as carrying flasks of spent fuel from Berkeley to Sellafield – and the larger loaded grey PXX marshalled behind Railfreight Metals liveried 47 347.  The PXX is specifically designed with suitable cooling and shielding systems to carry the still-highly-radioactive cores from nuclear submarines.

The dockyards have however branched out and also use their facilities to repair, repaint and modify a number of railway vehicles including coaches and HST power cars.  These vehicles added to the mix of traffic passing through.

Plymouth is famous for its naval dockyards at Devonport, home to many of the Royal Navy's surface and subsurface vessels. The "secret" trains to support the submarine fleet are regularly seen at Devonport Road, along with other general stores traffic. The dockyards have however branched out and also use their facilities to repair, repaint and modify a number of railway vehicles including coaches and HST power cars. These vehicles add to the mix of traffic passing through.What particularly impressed me as a spectator was the way that the impressive selection of trains and railway infrastructure was surrounded by “civilian” detail.

Indeed, who should feature on The Sun's online Page Three on Sunday 12 April 2015 but Courtnie Quinlan, former gymnastics champion of Devon and Cornwall and whose brother works in Plymouth's dockyards. What were the odds on that happening?Examples of this included as a disused branch line on a viaduct providing a scenic break, allotments, football stadium, shopping mall and sectioned leisure centre with detailed interior, seen above: along with the bowling green on Wardton another example of how sport can be used to add interest to a layout. Indeed, who should grace The Sun’s online Page Three on Sunday 12 April 2015 but Courtnie Quinlan of Plymouth, former gymnastics champion of Devon and Cornwall and whose brother works in Plymouth’s dockyards.  What were the odds on that happening?

DUDBROOK by Andrew Bartlett

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

The initials on the coke wagon nearest the camera - P.O.P. - stood for Peake, Oliver & Peake, one of the most respected names in the London coal business. Edward Copson Peake took over the family business of H.C.Peake and later Ernest Oliver and Robert Peake joined him. Oliver becoming general manager and the company was quite extensive at the end of the Victorian era. Over the years Peake, Oliver & Peake Ltd became London agents for various collieries, selling their coal for mainly domestic use but also had four contracts for the supply of gas-coal outside London.Dudbrook was a nine feet long fictitious 00 gauge Great Western Railway layout based in the late 1920s and early 1930s on a double track terminus with four platforms, engine shed and goods sidings.  It was 15 year old Andrew’s first exhibition layout.  The Bachmann Dynamis controlled Digital Command Controlled layout was made from Peco Code 100 track with Peco point motors mounted under the board and controlled by a simple switch panel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dudbrook was a nine feet long fictitious 00 gauge Great Western Railway layout based in the late 1920s and early 1930s on a double track terminus with four platforms, engine shed and goods sidings. It was 15 year old Andrew's first exhibition layout.The initials on the coke wagon nearest the camera – P.O.P. – stood for Peake, Oliver & Peake, one of the most respected names in the London coal business. Edward Copson Peake took over the family business of H.C.Peake and later Ernest Oliver and Robert Peake joined him. Oliver becoming general manager and the company was quite extensive at the end of the Victorian era. Over the years Peake, Oliver & Peake Ltd became London agents for various collieries, selling their coal for mainly domestic use but also had four contracts for the supply of gas-coal outside London.

Coke – a by-product of the gas works that the company supplied – would be resold for domestic use and could be transported wagons with extension boards as it was less dense than coal.  P.O.P. coke wagons could thus be found in Reading, Lincoln, Banbury and Harworth while the firm’s coal wagons were also seen much further afield as P.O.P.  bought coal from many different collieries around the country.

 

LINDON ROAD by John Long

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

Representing British Railways during the period 1950 to 1964, Lindon Road represented a fictional Southern Region branch line through station located in the River Medway area. The branch left the main Paddock Wood to Maidstone line near Yalding and ran close to the villages of Coxheath and Hunton to terminate at Chainhurst.Representing British Railways during the period 1950 to 1964, Lindon Road represented a fictional Southern Region branch line through station located in the River Medway area.  The branch left the main Paddock Wood to Maidstone line near Yalding and ran close to the villages of Coxheath and Hunton to terminate at Chainhurst.

The line was in its final few years of operation with the passenger service being run down to one and two coach trains, some of them being push-pull operated. Freight services however were still quite busy, with coal and grain terminals at Chainhurst ensuring the survival of the branch until the late 1960s.  Coupled next to a cattle wagon above is ex London & South Western Railway Adams B4 Class 0-4-0T 30089, two classmates of which have been preserved.

The layout itself consisted of three conventional chipboard and timber baseboards with self contained turntable fiddle yards at each end.  The track was SMP Scaleway, with points being made from the same company’s copper-clad kits.  Pointwork was operated by the old Hammant and Morgan solenoid motors, with the few signals being worked in the same way.

The scenery was based on polystyrene foam, carved to shape and covered with plaster bandage, painted and then overlaid with Woodland scenic ground cover. Motive power consisted of small tank engines and diesels, mostly kit built, of Southern and BR Standard origin, with passenger and goods stock from most of the kit manufacturers.The station building was based on East Farleigh on the Paddock Wood to Maidstone line ( still standing in 2015 ) with other railway buildings on the layout being made from modified commercial kits.  The low relief structures at the back of the layout were scratch built from Wills building sheets.  The scenery was based on polystyrene foam, carved to shape and covered with plaster bandage, painted and then overlaid with Woodland scenic ground cover.  Motive power consisted of small tank engines and diesels, mostly kit built, of Southern and BR Standard origin, with passenger and goods stock from most of the kit manufacturers.

ORCHARD ROAD TMD by Richard Slate

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

Orchard Road TMD is a DCC operated BR depot layout, based in the BR (Southern) region between 1975 and 1983 with locomotives seen in Devon during these years. A small depot has been modelled in a relatively small space, but includes a small maintenance building, locomotive refuelling and fuel off-loading siding (with storage tanks).Orchard Road TMD was a DCC operated BR depot layout, based in the BR Southern Region between 1975 and 1983 with locomotives seen in Devon during these years. A small depot had been modelled in a relatively small space, but included a small maintenance building, locomotive refuelling and fuel off-loading siding with storage tanks.  A siding was provided through the bridge forming the scenic break, representing the end of a track from the station beyond the bridge.

DCC operation of motive power and points was by NCE Powercab controller while locomoitves were a mixture of Bachmann, Hornby and Lima. More information on Orchard Road TMD can be found in a thread on www.rmweb.co.uk.All track was Peco 00 gauge, ballasted and then weathered to represent the track that would be seen at a diesel depot.  The major structures were scratch built but some buildings were kits.  Most were modified and detailed with plastic, white metal and etched brass components.  DCC operation of motive power and points was by NCE Powercab controller while locomotves were a mixture of Bachmann, Hornby and Lima.  More information on Orchard Road TMD can be found in a thread on www.rmweb.co.uk.

PEAFORE YARD by Rob Owst

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

Once again Rob Owst went back to the 1970s and the blue period of British Rail in the Bristol Area. More specifically, the inspiration for Peafore Yard - set in 1977 - came from pictures of the Avon Street yard in Bristol which was nestled in the shadow of Bristol Temple Meads station. Located at the end of a branch from the mainline at Lawrence Hill yard, the line was operated by Class 03 shunters in later years, the key traffic being cement in Presflo wagons, molasses in former Class B tankers and scrap trains although the latter traffic had ceased by 1977.Once again Rob Owst went back to the 1970s and the blue period of British Rail in the Bristol Area.  More specifically, the inspiration for Peafore Yard – set in 1977 – came from pictures of the Avon Street yard in Bristol which was nestled in the shadow of Bristol Temple Meads station.  Located at the end of a branch from the mainline at Lawrence Hill yard, the line was operated by Class 03 shunters in later years, the key traffic being cement in Presflo wagons, molasses in former Class B tankers and scrap trains although the latter traffic had ceased by 1977.

Seeing a picture of 03 382 passing the level crossing with traffic being held up by men with flags was crying out to be modelled and although the layout is far from a factual reproduction of Avon Street a number of structures, vehicles and cameos have been reproduced. 1977 was chosen as many practices from the steam era still survived in the operations of a range of diesel classes.Seeing a picture of 03 382 passing the level crossing with traffic being held up by men with flags was crying out to be modelled and although the layout is far from a factual reproduction of Avon Street a number of structures, vehicles and cameos have been reproduced.  1977 was chosen as many practices from the steam era still survived in the operations of a range of diesel classes.

THOMAS by Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Group

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

 

CLIC_2015_Thomas_SheepNew features on the ever popular interactive Thomas layout were fields of sheep and cattle, enclosed by fences and containing sheds to shelter the animals from inclement weather.  Although we take fields full of animals or crops for granted in Britain, like Roman Roads and Victorian railways they represent human interventions which have helped to subdivide the land and make it easier to navigate.  In fact Enclosure Acts for small areas had been passed sporadically since the 12th century, but with the rise of the Industrial Revolution they became more commonplace. In search of better financial returns, landowners looked for more efficient farming techniques and enclosures were also created so that landowners could charge higher rent to the people working the land. This was at least partially responsible for peasants leaving the countryside to work in the city in industrial factories.

WARDTON by Dave and Matt Wardrobe

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

Wardton was a fictional terminus somewhere on British Railways Western Region. Originally part of the GWR, it featured a two platform station, a goods yard and shed and a separate siding for a local factory. The track and points were Peco with signals built from MSE kits and components, operated by servos controlled by Heathcote boards. The signals were not interlocked with points and so safe train operation relied on the vigilance of the operator!. Buildings were mainly plastic or card kits with extra detailing while the goods shed was scratch built due to limitations of space.Wardton was a fictional terminus somewhere on British Railways Western Region.  Originally part of the GWR, it featured a two platform station, a goods yard and shed and a separate siding for a local factory.  The track and points were Peco with signals built from MSE kits and components, operated by servos controlled by Heathcote boards.  The signals were not interlocked with points and so safe train operation relied on the vigilance of the operator!.  Buildings were mainly plastic or card kits with extra detailing while the goods shed was scratch built due to limitations of space.

The Class 128 Diesel Parcels Unit was conceived in 1956 when British Railways decided that future parcels railcars should be capable of towing a tail load. This saw the Class 128s built by the Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company Limited with 230hp Leyland Albion engines with the first four single-car units being destined for Manchester and St Pancras. The Western Region also received six Gloucester Class 128s which were allocated initially to Leamington Spa and Tyseley and - as seen here - differed in having gangway connections on the cab fronts and split headcode boxes for the train reporting number to be displayed. The Class 128s survived in traffic through the 1970s and 1980s, but by 1990 all had been withdrawn after the designated traffic ended.The Class 128 Diesel Parcels Unit was conceived in 1956 when British Railways decided that future parcels railcars should be capable of towing a tail load. This saw the Class 128s built by the Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company Limited with 230hp Leyland Albion engines with the first four single-car units being destined for Manchester and St Pancras. The Western Region also received six Gloucester Class 128s which were allocated initially to Leamington Spa and Tyseley and – as seen here – differed in having gangway connections on the cab fronts and split headcode boxes for the train reporting number to be displayed.  The Class 128s survived in traffic through the 1970s and 1980s, but by 1990 all had been withdrawn after the designated traffic ended.

HERGEST by Peter Cullen

OO + 009 Gauge 4mm Scale

When the GWR extended its Leominster to Kington branch further on to New Radnor - Peter Cullen wrote in the show programme - the new railway ran for a distance parallel to the old horse drawn tramway to Hergest Ridge. The tramway was upgraded to a steam powered narrow gauge line - initially using a variety of locomotives but subsequently making use of the ex Glyn Valley Tramway engines which were purchased from the official receiver in 1935 and regauged to 2' 3".When the GWR extended its Leominster to Kington branch further on to New Radnor – Peter Cullen wrote in the show programme – the new railway ran for a distance parallel to the old horse drawn tramway to Hergest Ridge.  The tramway was upgraded to a steam powered narrow gauge line – initially using a variety of locomotives but subsequently making use of the ex Glyn Valley Tramway engines – including 0-4-2T “Sir Theodore” built by Beyer Peacock in 1888 – which were purchased from the official receiver in 1935 and regauged to 2′ 3″.

The GWR were persuaded to construct a small station at Hergest to allow a secondary interchange between the standard and narrow gauges.  As well as serving facilities at Hergest, the narrow gauge railway provided the local community with a means of transporting incoming coal and outgoing stone and foodstuffs.

The layout was set in the autumn of 1947, a surfeit of ex army road vehicles and the return to civilian life of men seeking work would lead to the closure of both the narrow gauge and standard gauge railways within five years.

The GWR were persuaded to construct a small station at Hergest to allow a secondary interchange between the standard and narrow gauges. As well as serving facilities at Hergest, the narrow gauge railway provided the local community with a means of transporting incoming coal and outgoing stone and foodstuffs.A notice on the layout also declared that “The line was ignored by photographers and historians and following closure all evidence of the line has disappeared.”  The Great Western Railway did in fact build a standard gauge line to New Radnor from Leominster via Titley Junction and Kington although I can find no reference to a horse tramway in the area.  I was, however, impressed by the layout’s combination of an end-to-end 00 gauge high level system with an 009 oval and sidings underneath.

 

 

 

RHEILFFORDD CLYDACH RAILWAY 

by Richard Holder

009 Gauge 4mm Scale

This layout represented a fictional preserved tourist railway situated somewhere on the coast of north-west Wales. Richard had imagined that the original line was built to carry slate from quarries in the mountains to the port of Aberclydach. After commercial operation ceased, the Clydach Railway Preservation Society took over the ownership of the railway in 1954 and re-opened it. The line later expanded onto the trackbed and bridges of a standard gauge branch line which had closed in the 60’s.This layout represented a fictional preserved tourist railway situated somewhere on the coast of north-west Wales. Richard had imagined that the original line was built to carry slate from quarries in the mountains to the port of Aberclydach. After commercial operation ceased, the Clydach Railway Preservation Society took over the ownership of the railway in 1954 and re-opened it. The line later expanded onto the trackbed and bridges of a standard gauge branch line which had closed in the 60s.

The new section was opened in 1979 and since then passenger numbers have grown, new stock has been built and now the Clydach Railway (Rheilffordd Clydach) is undoubtedly one of the “Great Little Trains of Wales”. The layout was featured in Railway Modeller magazine in November 2010, and also in the May & June 2012 issues. A wide variety of stock was run on the layout representing a variety of narrow gauge lines. Locomotives included a number of Garratt articulated designs. There were two stations on different levels with inclines and an impressive girder bridge across a river estuary. The layout also featured a colourful beach scene and many other scenic details.The new section was opened in 1979 and since then passenger numbers have grown, new stock has been built and now the Clydach Railway (Rheilffordd Clydach) is undoubtedly one of the “Great Little Trains of Wales”. The layout was featured in Railway Modeller magazine in November 2010, and also in the May & June 2012 issues. A wide variety of stock was run on the layout representing a variety of narrow gauge lines. Locomotives included a number of Garratt articulated designs. There were two stations on different levels with inclines and an impressive girder bridge across a river estuary. The layout also featured a colourful beach scene and many other scenic details.

HOBBS ROW HALT by Bob Vaughan

009 Gauge 4mm Scale

Hobbs Row Halt was a classic English country micro-layout, complete with thatched cottage and "chocolate box" garden. It started out as a simple circular piece of track on an MDF wobble board, obtained from a local charity shop, used for running in new locomotives before some surplus buildings from Bob's Tansey Bank layout were added to check on coach clearances. The cottage was from the Bachmann Pendon Little Chapel Cottage resin model while the trees were from the Realistic Modelling Materials range of ready to plant foliage. Hobbs Row Halt, complete with tram engine "Lawrence" below, featured in the August 2013 edition of Hornby Magazine.Hobbs Row Halt was a classic English country micro-layout, complete with thatched cottage and “chocolate box” garden.  It started out as a simple circular piece of track on an MDF wobble board, obtained from a local charity shop, used for running in new locomotives before some surplus buildings from Bob’s Tansey Bank layout were added to check on coach clearances.  The cottage was from the Bachmann Pendon Little Chapel Cottage resin model while the trees were from the Realistic Modelling Materials range of ready to plant foliage.  Hobbs Row Halt featured in the August 2013 edition of Hornby Magazine.

TANSEY BANK 

by Bob Vaughan

009 Gauge 4mm Scale

In its present form Tansey Bank represented the main terminal station and engine shed on a preserved ex industrial railway located somewhere around Warwickshire in the early 1960s. All of the rolling stock operating on the layout was either kit built or ready to run and was fitted with Greenwich couplings which have proved reliable and given automatic uncoupling to the layout - thereby freeing it from the "Hand of God". Weathering on the layout was achieved through acrylic paint, brown ink and matt varnish to create a uniform work-stained appearance. Tansey Bank appeared in the October 2013 edition of Hornby Magazine.In its present form Tansey Bank represented the main terminal station and engine shed on a preserved ex industrial railway located somewhere around Warwickshire in the early 1960s.  All of the rolling stock operating on the layout was either kit built or ready to run and was fitted with Greenwich couplings which have proved reliable and given automatic uncoupling to the layout – thereby freeing it from the “Hand of God”.  Weathering on the layout was achieved through acrylic paint, brown ink and matt varnish to create a uniform work-stained appearance.  Tansey Bank appeared in the October 2013 edition of Hornby Magazine.

The Rail Truck is the rail version of the Lister Auto Truck, first produced by R.A. Lister & Company Limited in the spring of 1926. The original Auto Truck was a simple three wheeled vehicle with a single wheel at the front driven by an air cooled J.A. Prestwich (JAP) 600cc petrol engine.Seen in front of the Sentinel-hauled passenger train is a freight headed by a Dursley built Lister Rail Truck – based on the Auto Truck, first produced by R.A. Lister & Company Limited in the spring of 1926. The original Auto Truck was a simple three wheeled vehicle with a single wheel at the front driven by an air cooled J.A. Prestwich (JAP) 600cc petrol engine.

Following the success of the Auto Truck a petrol locomotive was designed in 1928. These used the same JAP engine, oil and fuel tanks and front housing as the Auto Truck. The latter comprised a cast iron grille carrying the words ‘Lister’ and ‘Auto Truck’ at the front with a plain sheet steel curved bonnet top and sides. The whole assembly of the Rail Truck is mounted on a simple four wheeled chassis. Suspension is provided by pairs of coil springs over each axle box. Power to the axles is transmitted via a multi-plate clutch and two speed bi-directional gearbox. To improve adhesion four large cast iron weights are bolted onto the frames. Those at the ends are plain but those fitted either side have the name 'LISTER' cast on them.Following the success of the Auto Truck a petrol locomotive was designed in 1928. These used the same JAP engine, oil and fuel tanks and front housing as the Auto Truck. The latter comprised a cast iron grille carrying the words ‘Lister’ and ‘Auto Truck’ at the front with a plain sheet steel curved bonnet top and sides.  The whole assembly of the Rail Truck is mounted on a simple four wheeled chassis. Suspension is provided by pairs of coil springs over each axle box. Power to the axles is transmitted via a multi-plate clutch and two speed bi-directional gearbox. To improve adhesion four large cast iron weights are bolted onto the frames. Those at the ends are plain but those fitted either side have the name ‘LISTER’ cast on them.

GOES LIKE A ROCKET by Alan Drewett

009 Gauge 4mm Scale

The six Grumman Lunar Modules - originally termed Lunar Excursion Modules by NASA and often referred to as LEMs - that they used were all slightly different from each other and so the left hand side of my lunar diorama was an attempt to portray the typical equipment of an early Apollo (H-Class) Moon landing rather than replicate a specific mission down to the last footprint in the dust.Goes like a Rocket is a presentation I have developed on space and rocketry which will be on the Gloucestershire model engineering show circuit – and maybe even beyond – during 2015 and 2016.  It is based on four core diorama boxes – the first featuring rocket firing  Sherman Calliope tanks on the banks of the River Rhine close to a narrow gauge railway – each containing 4mm scale models and some larger models, mainly at a scale of 1/144.  

More specifically, the Soviet R-7 and American Saturn V built by Ryan Wheatstone and Tim Mansfield respectively were joined by a Space Shuttle carrying Boeing 747, Virgin Galactic Space Ship One and White Knight, Lockheed SR-71 Drone Director and Bell Nike Hercules anti-aircraft missile. Thanks are also due to Jet Age members Ryan and Tim for looking after Goes Like a Rocket on Saturday 11 April 2015.More specifically, the Soviet R-7 and American Saturn V built by Ryan Wheatstone and Tim Mansfield respectively were joined by a Space Shuttle carrying Boeing 747, Virgin Galactic Space Ship One and White Knight, Lockheed SR-71 Drone Director and Bell Nike Hercules anti-aircraft missile.  Thanks are also due to Jet Age members Ryan and Tim for looking after Goes Like a Rocket on Saturday 11 April 2015.

PETER LEE

4mm Scale.

A very pleasant surprise in participating in the Cheltenham GWR Modellers Exhibition of April 2015 was making the acquaintance of Peter Lee of Newtown, Powys, who had previously displayed dioramas of Wynn's heavy haulage lorries. On this occasion Peter brought to St Margaret's Hall his diorama of a Shell garage turned transport cafe, complete with lorries carrying heavy construction plant - another of Peter's passions. I look forward to seeing how this exhibit develops in the future.A very pleasant surprise in participating in the Cheltenham GWR Modellers Exhibition of April 2015 was making the acquaintance of Peter Lee of Newtown, Powys, who had previously displayed dioramas of Wynn’s heavy haulage lorries.  On this occasion Peter brought to St Margaret’s Hall his diorama of a Shell garage turned transport cafe, complete with lorries carrying heavy construction plant – another of Peter’s passions.  I look forward to seeing how this exhibit develops in the future.

MODEL BUS FEDERATION AND NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT MODELLERS 

Represented by Paul and David Mellor

4mm Scale

CLIC_2015_Mellor_Dennis Trident ALX 400 PinkIt is always a joy to be re-united with The Mellor Brothers and their ever expanding fleets of local buses and lorries.  Among the highlights of their presentation were this North Western Road Car Company (Glos) Limited’s Dennis Trident with an Alexander ALX 400 body painted in the livery of cancer charity www.pink-car-rally.com, seen leaving Brocklecote Bus Station close to Optare Solo SRs and a Volvo Olympian on tow to scrapping at Carlton near Barnsley in South Yorkshire.

Among the lorries, a Volvo FH in the yellow livery of H&N Bounds of Tidenham cast a spell while joining the Moreton C. Cullimore fleet were Little Nell (Bedford KM), Mr Boffin (Ford Thames Trader), Uriah Heep (Dodge K500) and Bill Sykes – a Commer Maxiload.

It is always a joy to be re-united with The Mellor Brothers and their ever expanding fleets of local buses and lorries. Among the highlights of their presentation were a Volvo FH in the yellow livery of H&N Bounds of Tidenham and from the Moreton C. Cullimore fleet Little Nell (Bedford KM), Mr Boffin (Ford Thames Trader), Uriah Heep (Dodge K500) and Bill Sykes - a Commer Maxiload. This particular make and model of rigid chassis dropside was also depicted outside the River View Cafe in the brown livery of Martins of Sling.This particular make and model of rigid chassis dropside tipper was also depicted outside the River View Cafe in the brown livery of Martins of Sling.  In the 1960s, the Commer Maximum Payload was the ultimate expression of the C series, powered by a TS3 3-cylinder two-stroke engine and  identified by twin headlamps and (usually) a Rootes Diesel badge beneath the grille. The ‘C’ range was ‘heavy duty’ so has deeper chassis rails, 10-stud wheels and a generally ‘chunky’ appearance of chassis and wheels.

Meanwhile, the road outside the River View Cafe also played temporary host to Nick Weaver's splendid model of a Ski Jump funfair ride on the move. Part of the Flying Coaster family of rides, a fully deployed Ski Jump features cars on a unicycle undercarriage attached to arms which power them round a circular track, rising and falling as they go.Meanwhile, the road outside the River View Cafe also played temporary host to Nick Weaver’s splendid model of a Ski Jump funfair ride on the move.  Part of the Flying Coaster family of rides, a fully deployed Ski Jump features cars on a unicycle undercarriage attached to arms which power them round a circular track, rising and falling as they go.

Meanwhile, RLC Transport of The Reddings, Cheltenham, was established in 1986 as an owner-operator and has grown to be one of Gloucestershire’s premier Heavy Haulage companies, transporting plant and machinery to both the building and construction industries with a nationwide coverage including Ireland and Western Europe. Among the cab units capable of tackling the heaviest of loads is this Scania 8×6.Moving into the 21st Century, RLC Transport -based at The Reddings, Cheltenham but with a depot in Tewkesbury – was established in 1986 as an owner-operator.  It has since grown to be one of Gloucestershire’s premier Heavy Haulage companies, transporting plant and machinery to both the building and construction industries with a nationwide coverage including Ireland and Western Europe.  Among the cab units capable of tackling the heaviest of loads is this 620 bhp Scania R 8×4 modelled using Corgi components and bearing the proud legend “King of the Load”.  It is pictured on the road outside the gates of Andy Peckham’s Travel 2000 yard among contemporary modern traffic.

TRAVEL 2000

by Andy Peckham

4mm Scale

Similarly, Andy Peckham’s Travel 2000 always has something new and interesting to offer whether the spectator looks at the School Bus, Wedding Hire, local service bus or long distance executive hire fleet.Similarly, Andy Peckham’s Travel 2000 always has something new and interesting to offer whether the spectator looks at the School Bus, Wedding Hire, local service bus or long distance executive hire fleet.  Pictured left for example is a three axle Leyland Super Olympian with an Alexander ALX500 body imported from Hong Kong for the busiest part of the school run.

In the background above and in the foreground left is an AEC Swift repatriated from Malta - in recent years a honeypot for bus enthusiasts due to its dazzling variety of owner operator public service vehicles. This particular single decker - manufactured in Southall between 1964 and 1980 - has been modified with a grille from a British Leyland Ergomatic lorry cab and retains the traditional Maltese bus livery.In the background above and in the foreground left is an AEC Swift repatriated from Malta – a honeypot for bus enthusiasts due to its dazzling yet disappearing variety of owner operator public service vehicles.  This particular single decker – manufactured in Southall between 1964 and 1980 – has been modified with a grille from a British Leyland Ergomatic lorry cab and retains the traditional white and yellow Maltese bus livery.  In recent years however, bus services on the George Cross island have been rationalised with fleets of newer, often Chinese built, vehicles replacing the idiosyncratic British-based homebuilt modifications.  Indeed, bus spotters on Malta can often be heard ejaculating “That’s a King Long bus” only to be answered with the rejoinder “No, it only has a short wheelbase”.

MINI SCENES

St Margaret’s Hall welcomed the return of Redditch based Tracey Lippett and her Mini Scenes: dioramas including rocks, cliffs, streams, bogs and other water features and also often featuring Minis and other classic British cars as well as flying saucers and aliens! Tracey is also keen to help other modellers with their tricky scenic issues and can be emailed on Reddmini@aol.com.St Margaret’s Hall welcomed the return of Redditch based Tracey Lippett and her Mini Scenes: dioramas including rocks, cliffs, streams, bogs and other water features and also often featuring Minis and other classic British cars as well as flying saucers and aliens!  Tracey is also keen to help other modellers with their tricky scenic issues and can be emailed on Reddmini@aol.com.  In the view above London & North Eastern Railway B1 Class 4-6-0 1234 is seen hauling what might be considered an out of gauge saucer load on a flat wagon between two tankers.

MODELLING DEMONSTRATION

by Steve Harrod, Trevor Hale, Mark Begley and Andi Dell

The April 2015 Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Exhibition also featured trade support from Cheltenham Model Centre, Clive Reid’s pre-enjoyed model railways, Stewart Blencowe’s Railway timetables, books, photos and slides, Castle Trains and the Festiniog Railway.The April 2015 Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Exhibition also featured trade support from Cheltenham Model Centre, Clive Reid’s pre-enjoyed model railways, Stewart Blencowe’s Railway timetables, books, photos and slides, Castle Trains and the Festiniog Railway.

Thanks must also go to Robert Webb for displaying his Digital Command Control demonstration layout featuring the unique Caprotti valve gear fitted British Standard 8P three cylindered pacific 71000 "Duke of Gloucester" alongside English Electric Class 40 1Co-Co1 Type 4 97408 and, from capital stock, English Electric Class 37 Co-Co 37 012 "Loch Rannoch"Thanks must also go to Robert Webb for displaying his Digital Command Control demonstration layout featuring the unique Caprotti valve gear fitted British Standard 8P three cylindered pacific 71000 “Duke of Gloucester” alongside English Electric Class 40 1Co-Co1 Type 4 97408 and, from capital stock, English Electric Class 37 Co-Co 37 012 “Loch Rannoch”

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