Cheltenham GWR Modellers October 2015 Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargeant

A profile of CLIC Sargeant as a charity and reviews of past Cheltenham GWR Modellers shows can be found at

http://glostransporthistory.visit-gloucestershire.co.uk/wordpresscheltenhGWRCLIC.htm

Once again model railway enthusiasts from all over Gloucestershire travelled to the Cheltenham GWR Modellers October 2015 Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargent  at St Margaret’s Hall, Coniston Road, Cheltenham, GL51 3NX on Saturday and Sunday 24 and 25 October  2015 for the following attractions:

WORCESTER ROAD DIESEL DEPOT 

by Steve Harrod – Cheltenham Diesel Hydraulic Modellers

Gauge 1 Scale 1/32

Worcester Road Diesel Depot was a Gauge 1 ( 1/32 scale ) straight road shed operated from the front and measuring 2’ wide by 10’ long, of which 6’ was the scenic section, deliberately presented to the viewer from the side rather than from above to give the feeling of actually being inside the shed with the highly detailed locomotive models. Everything was scratchbuilt apart from the barrels, lathes and other tools which were sourced from Italeri, Verlinden and Accurate Armour 1/35 scale military kits. Worcester Road was located in Hereford and was used to oil, fuel and water locomotives – mainly Warship Class diesel hydraulics - arriving on London trains although rolling stock could also be serviced when carriage and wagon repair shop were full.Worcester Road Diesel Depot was a Gauge 1 ( 1/32 scale ) straight road shed operated from the front and measuring 2’ wide by 10’ long, of which 6’ was the scenic section, deliberately presented to the viewer from the side rather than from above to give the feeling of actually being inside the shed with the highly detailed locomotive models.

Everything was scratchbuilt apart from the barrels, lathes and other tools which were sourced from Italeri, Verlinden and Accurate Armour 1/35 scale military kits. Worcester Road was located in Hereford and was used to oil, fuel and water locomotives – mainly Warship Class diesel hydraulics - arriving on London trains although rolling stock could also be serviced when carriage and wagon repair shop were full. I particularly liked the mechanic working on his Vespa scooter - the Gloster Unibus ancestor of which is now on display at Jet Age Museum, Staverton.Everything was scratchbuilt apart from the barrels, lathes and other tools which were sourced from Italeri, Verlinden and Accurate Armour 1/35 scale military kits. Worcester Road was located in Hereford and was used to oil, fuel and water locomotives – mainly Warship Class diesel hydraulics – arriving on London trains although rolling stock could also be serviced when carriage and wagon repair shop were full.  I particularly liked the mechanic working on his Vespa scooter – the Gloster Unibus ancestor of which is now on display at Jet Age Museum, Staverton.

 

VALENCIA HARBOUR by Andy Cundick

21mm Gauge  4mm Scale

The line to the windswept settlement of Valencia, County Kerry, left the Great Southern and Western Railway line between Killarney and Tralee at Farranfore and was built in a number of stages between 1885 and 1893. By 1935, when this layout was set, Valencia Harbour - by then in the Irish Free State - could claim to be both the most westerly railhead in Europe and the point at which the North Atlantic telegraph cable - marked by a red diamond on a pole - entered the ocean. Sadly the real 5' 3" gauge line from Farranfore to Valencia Harbour closed in 1960 but Andy's layout provided an arena for some landmark Irish rolling stock.The line to the windswept settlement of Valencia, County Kerry,  left the Great Southern and Western Railway line between Killarney and Tralee at Farranfore and was built in a number of stages between 1885 and 1893.  By 1935, when this layout was set, the fishing port of Valencia Harbour – by then in the Irish Free State – could claim to be both the most westerly railhead in Europe and the point at which the North Atlantic telegraph cable  – marked by a red diamond on a pole – entered the ocean.  Sadly the real 5′ 3″ gauge line from Farranfore to Valencia Harbour closed in 1960 but Andy’s layout provided an arena for some landmark Irish rolling stock.

Locomotive 109 - pictured left - examples of what was by far the most numerous class of locomotive (diesel or steam) ever to run in Ireland. 111 of these 0-6-0s were built between 1866 and 1903 with only minor modifications between batches. The great majority were built by the GS&WR at Inchicore, though the construction of some examples was contracted out to Beyer Peacock and Sharp Stewart, both famous Manchester based locomotive building firms.Locomotive 109 – pictured left – examples of what was by far the most numerous class of locomotive (diesel or steam) ever to run in Ireland. 111 of these Class 101 0-6-0s were built between 1866 and 1903 with only minor modifications between batches. The great majority were built by the GS&WR at Inchicore, though the construction of some examples was contracted out to Beyer Peacock and Sharp Stewart, famous locomotive building firms based in Manchester and Glasgow respectively.  The J15s – as the Class 101s were later known – survived long after many more modern locomotives were scrapped and when the Republic of Ireland’s national railway CIÉ abandoned steam haulage at the end of 1962 they were still the most numerous class with nearly half their number still in traffic. They were to be found all over the broad gauge lines of the Republic on all duties from shunting to main line passenger turns.

Moving forward in time beyond the GS&WR's maroon birdcage stock was Córas Iompair Éireann's Class C Bo-Bo diesel electrics introduced in 1956. Like British Railway's Class 28 Co-Bos these were built in Manchester by Metropolitan Vickers and fitted with Crossley engines and unfortunately they were about as successful.Moving forward in time beyond the GS&WR’s maroon birdcage stock was Córas Iompair Éireann’s Class C Bo-Bo diesel electric C201, introduced in 1956.  Like British Railway’s 1958 vintage Class 28 Co-Bos, these were built in Manchester by Metropolitan Vickers and fitted with Crossley engines.  Unfortunately they were about as reliable and the Class Cs – later known as Class 201 -were re-engined with more powerful General Motors diesels from 1969 and survived into the 1980s.

 

CODRINGTON by Sodbury Vale MRC

00 Gauge  4mm Scale

This Digital Command Control layout showed what can be achieved using modern and readily available OO gauge products and materials. Hornby and Bachmann buildings were used in conjunction with Peco Code 75 fine track, Fulgarex slow action point motors and signals from the new Dapol range. Codrington - which measured 12' x 2' - depicted a typical branch line terminus set in the 1950s and early 1960s with buildings, details, locomotives and rolling stock - fitted with Sprat and Winkle couplings for hands-off operation - reflecting a setting not too far from the Bristol area.This Digital Command Control layout showed what can be achieved using modern and readily available OO gauge products and materials.  Hornby and Bachmann buildings were used in conjunction with Peco Code 75 fine track, Fulgarex slow action point motors and signals from the new Dapol range.

Codrington - which measured 12' x 2' - depicted a typical branch line terminus set in the 1950s and early 1960s with buildings, details, locomotives and rolling stock - fitted with Sprat and Winkle couplings for hands-off operation - reflecting a setting not too far from the Bristol area.Codrington – which measured 12′ x 2′ – depicted a typical branch line terminus set in the 1950s and early 1960s with buildings, details, locomotives and rolling stock – fitted with Sprat and Winkle couplings for hands-off operation –  reflecting a setting not too far from the Bristol area.

 

 

MUCH MURKLE by Nick Wood

00 Gauge  4mm Scale

Much Murkle - population 1452 according to the 1931 census - was set in a fictitious 1930s community in Herefordshire and was served by a single track branch from the equally fictitious junction at Newent on the Gloucester to Hereford Line. The branch was just 8 miles long, with one intermediate station at the village of Kempstone and a small halt serving Sollers Hall.Much Murkle – population 1452 according to the 1931 census – was set in a fictitious 1930s community in Herefordshire and was served by a single track branch from the equally fictitious junction at Newent on the Gloucester to Hereford Line.  The branch was just 8 miles long, with one intermediate station at the village of Kempstone and a small halt serving Sollers Hall.

There was a rail served quarry located approximately 1 mile outside of Much Murkle. All trains departing the quarry had to be reversed at the terminus due to the quarry having no run round facility making for more interesting stock movements. The quarry was not the only significant industry using the line. Rancoutt Cider used the branch to distribute their fine cider and perry to the outside world. Vans from all of the big four rail companies could be found in their sidings and among the passenger trains was an early iteration of the classic Great Western auto train.There was a rail served quarry located approximately 1 mile outside of Much Murkle. All trains departing the quarry had to be reversed at the terminus due to the quarry having no run round facility making for more interesting stock movements.  The quarry was not the only significant industry using the line. Rancoutt Cider used the branch to distribute their fine cider and perry to the outside world.  Vans from all of the big four rail companies could be found in their sidings and among the passenger trains was an early iteration of the classic Great Western auto train.

 

NEWTON EAST by Paul and Margaret Garratt

00 Gauge  4mm Scale

Newton East as the name implies was a station on the outskirts of the town of Newton. Originally built by a Pre-grouping Company the line survived the Beeching cuts and forms a busy avoiding line. The goods yard was also busy as the old factory buildings had been taken over by a mail order company and so wagons came and went bringing and taking away products.Newton East as the name implies was a station on the outskirts of the town of Newton. Originally built by a Pre-grouping Company the line survived the Beeching cuts and forms a busy avoiding line. The goods yard was also busy as the old factory buildings had been taken over by a mail order company and so wagons came and went bringing and taking away products.
In reality the layout was purely fictitious and had been designed and built to entertain the viewing public and provide interest for the operators. The layout had no geographical location but was set during the period of 1955-65 and showed rolling stock (predominantly diesels) that would have been seen on British Railways during that period.

The layout permitted rolling stock from the Southern/Western and Midland/Eastern/North Eastern regions to be run together. The track work was ‘SMP’ with hand built point work using PCB sleepers and nickel-silver bull-head rail and operated with ‘Peco’ motors. Electrically the layout could be operated by 1 or 2 operators with their own controllers. The buildings were mainly from card or plastic kits either as designed or modified to suit. The rolling stock was a mixture of proprietary and kit built, all featured vehicles would have been seen on BR in the 1955-65 period although not necessarily together.The layout permitted rolling stock from the Southern/Western and Midland/Eastern/North Eastern regions to be run together.  The track work was ‘SMP’ with hand built point work using PCB sleepers and nickel-silver bull-head rail and operated with ‘Peco’ motors. Electrically the layout could be operated by 1 or 2 operators with their own controllers.  The buildings were mainly from card or plastic kits either as designed or modified to suit.  The rolling stock was a mixture of proprietary and kit built, all featured vehicles would have been seen on BR in the 1955-65 period although not necessarily together.

 

OAKLEY GREEN by Jamie Mathlin

00 Gauge  4mm Scale

Oakley, based on the rural home counties to the west of London in the 1970s, was inspired by locations such as Micheldever and Eastleigh and featured an oil storage depot, diesel servicing area and refuelling point and small parcels depot. The oil depot - complete with plant room - comprised six large cylindrical tanks with piping on gantry work connecting to the rail tanker loading areas and feeding an underground road loading complex. The majority of the buildings were scratch built with detailing items taken from kits. The track was Peco Code 75 with full DCC using NCE PowerCab to control powered points and working signals. Similarly. the blue diesel locomotives were DCC sound and light fitted.Oakley, based on the rural home counties to the west of London in the 1970s, was inspired by locations such as Micheldever and Eastleigh and featured an oil storage depot, diesel servicing area and refuelling point and small parcels depot.  The oil depot – complete with plant room – comprised six large cylindrical tanks with piping on gantry work connecting to the rail tanker loading areas and feeding an underground road loading complex.

The majority of the buildings were scratch built with detailing items taken from kits. The track was Peco Code 75 with full DCC using NCE PowerCab to control powered points and working signals. Similarly. the blue diesel locomotives were DCC sound and light fitted.The majority of the buildings were scratch built with detailing items taken from kits.  The track was Peco Code 75 with full DCC using NCE PowerCab to control powered points and working signals.  Similarly. the blue diesel locomotives were DCC sound and light fitted.

 

THOMAS by Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Group

OO Gauge 4mm Scale

 

New features on the ever popular interactive Thomas layout in October 2015 included Tarmac liveried PGA wagon 14007. Originally introduced in 1972, this type of air braked two axle hopper could carry a load of 50 tons - over three times its unladen weight. A number of modern construction techniques enabled it to accept this much limestone. The mild steel body was welded rather than riveted and the hopper itself was integrated with the underframe.New features on the ever popular interactive Thomas layout in October 2015 included Tarmac liveried PGA wagon 14007.  Originally introduced in 1972, this type of air braked two axle hopper could carry a load of 50 tons – over three times its unladen weight.  A number of modern construction techniques enabled it to accept this much limestone.  The mild steel body was welded rather than riveted and the hopper itself was integrated with the underframe with hollow U-section solebars kinked over to meet the lower portion of the hopper and form a closed tube.  In this way, two strips of the angled hopper wall both retained the limestone and formed part of a stressed skin structure.  The lightweight tubes withstood buffing compression on the wagon as well as direct vertical forces, while various struts and stiffeners ensured that all other stresses were spread evenly throughout the vehicle.

 

UNIVERSAL WORKS IN THE GATHERING STORM  by Alan Drewett

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

The title “Universal Works in The Gathering Storm” for this combination of Big Four steam locomotives, private owner wagons and 1930s RAF aircraft was inspired by the first volume of Winston Churchill’s six part history of the Second World War, dealing with the years from 1919 until Britain’s declaration of war on Germany on Sunday 3 September 1939. In the “wilderness years” between his memorable times as First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill was elected as a back bench MP for Epping from 1924 and later worked on a biography of his ancestor, the first Duke of Marlborough. But after Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in 1933 – and then reformed the banned Luftwaffe from 1935 – Churchill became an increasingly committed opponent of Britain’s appeasement of European dictators.The title “Universal Works in The Gathering Storm” for this combination of Big Four steam locomotives, private owner wagons and 1930s RAF aircraft was inspired by the first volume of Winston Churchill’s six part history of the Second World War, dealing with the years from 1919 until Britain’s declaration of war on Germany on Sunday 3 September 1939.  In the “wilderness years” between his memorable times as First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill was elected as a back bench MP for Epping from 1924 and later worked on a biography of his ancestor, the first Duke of Marlborough.  But after Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in 1933 – and then reformed the banned Luftwaffe from 1935 – Churchill became an increasingly committed opponent of Britain’s appeasement of European dictators.

Some last minute substitutions to the aircraft line up as described in the layout graphics were a second Fairey Battle and a Boulton Paul Defiant turret fighter made from the new tool Airfix kit by Tim Mansfield of the Jet Age Museum, who very kindly looked after and operated Universal Works on Saturday 24 October 2015. This is not to say that Gloster Gladiators and Hawker Hurricanes will not be back at St Margaret's Hall some time in the future however! Similarly, the last ever Cheltenham GWR Modeller's Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargeant was also an opportunity for Roger Webb to run his new Sentinel shunter and GWR "Chariot" shunters wagon on Universal Works.Some last minute substitutions to the aircraft line up as described in the layout graphics were a second Fairey Battle and a Boulton Paul Defiant turret fighter made from the new tool Airfix kit by Tim Mansfield of the Jet Age Museum, who very kindly looked after and operated Universal Works on Saturday 24 October 2015.  This is not to say that Gloster Gladiators and Hawker Hurricanes will not be back at St Margaret’s Hall some time in the future however!  Similarly, the last ever Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargeant was also an opportunity for Roger Webb to run his new coupling rod fitted Hornby Sentinel shunter and GWR “Chariot” shunters wagon on Universal Works.  Now owned by the Iron & Steel Traction Group and based on the Nene Valley Railway,  Rolls Royce (who owned Sentinel from 1958) 0-4-0DH ‘Barabel’ (RR 10202/1964) which was originally new to the Oxfordshire Ironstone Company Ltd.  This gives me an idea for a future presentation with 1960s jet aircraft…..

 

BETTWS ROAD by Tony Hubbard and Michelle Brindle

N Gauge  2mm Scale

Bettws Road was a fictional terminus with goods yard and coal staithes in the Wales of the 1930s and 40s. GWR railcars - including both Swindon and Gloucester RCW bodied examples -served the station while express passenger and freight trains passed by on the main line.Bettws Road was a fictional terminus with goods yard and coal staithes in the Wales of the 1930s and 40s.  GWR railcars – including both Swindon and Gloucester RCW bodied examples -served the station while through passenger and freight trains passed by on the main line. In particular, as well as the beautifully detailed signalbox interior, I liked this line up of Swindon built parcels railcar 34 next to Dean Goods 0-6-0 2537, whose train included an Aero wagon for three-bladed propellers.

Two-bladed propellers for early aeroplanes could easily be transported in normal open wagons, however, by the late 1930s, three-bladed propellers with adjustable-pitch attachments in the bosses had been developed. Therefore, the GWR issued diagram E4 and built five wagons in 1938 for the special purpose of carrying these awkward loads, described as 'wagons for three-bladed air screws with trestles and aperture in the floor'. Perhaps unsurprisingly, a further 170 were built during the early years of the Second World War. They received the telegraphic codename 'AERO' after 1942. The wagons were basically standard O32 open wagon underframes with a complete overall deck apart from an aperture to take the two crates that could be carried. The end of the war and the subsequent development of commercial jet engines reduced the manufacture of airplane propellers and hence the need for these wagons; most had been converted to their original design as simple open wagons by the early 1950s.Two-bladed propellers for early aeroplanes could easily be transported in normal open wagons, however, by the late 1930s, three-bladed propellers with adjustable-pitch attachments in the bosses had been developed. Therefore, the GWR issued diagram E4 and built five wagons in 1938 for the special purpose of carrying these awkward loads, described as ‘wagons for three-bladed air screws with trestles and aperture in the floor’. Perhaps unsurprisingly, a further 170 were built during the early years of the Second World War. They received the telegraphic codename ‘AERO’ after 1942. The wagons were basically standard O32 open wagon underframes with a complete overall deck apart from an aperture to take the two crates that could be carried.  The end of the war and the subsequent development of commercial jet engines reduced the manufacture of airplane propellers and hence the need for these wagons; most had been converted to their original design as simple open wagons by the early 1950s.

 

SOUTH DOWNS BUS RALLY AND VINTAGE SHOW

by Vincent Tweed

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

This diorama is a small representation of the Southdowns Bus Rally and Vintage Show which is held annually in West Sussex over the Spring Bank Holiday weekend. The venue is Fennel Farm located on the A286 between Chichester and Midhurst. It is one of the most prestigious events in southern England, attracting exhibitors and visitors from far and wide and one of those "must see" events in the rally calendar. It is in the territory of the former Sussex based bus and coach operator Southdown Motor Services and, as would be expected, a range of preserved Southdown vehicles are present. Also, public service vehicles of former and current operators are displayed and used for bus rides and mystery tours. A number of preserved commercial vehicles from the locality can be seen and there is a range of cars, motorcycles, tractors and other means of road transport and machinery.This diorama is a small representation of the Southdowns Bus Rally and Vintage Show which is held annually in West Sussex over the Spring Bank Holiday weekend.  The venue is Fennel Farm located on the A286 between Chichester and Midhurst.  It is one of the most prestigious events in southern England, attracting exhibitors and visitors from far and wide and one of those “must see” events in the rally calendar.

It is in the territory of the former Sussex based bus and coach operator Southdown Motor Services and, as would be expected, a range of preserved Southdown vehicles are present. Also, public service vehicles of former and current operators are displayed and used for bus rides and mystery tours. A number of preserved commercial vehicles from the locality can be seen and there is a range of cars, motorcycles, tractors and other means of road transport and machinery.It is in the territory of the former Sussex based bus and coach operator Southdown Motor Services and, as would be expected, a range of preserved Southdown vehicles are present.  Also, public service vehicles of former and current operators are displayed and used for bus rides and mystery tours.  A number of preserved commercial vehicles from the locality can be seen and there is a range of cars, motorcycles, tractors and other means of road transport and machinery.

THE TOWN SCENE   by Martin Nash

00 Gauge 4mm Scale

I was both pleased and moved to see Martin Nash continuing and expanding the work of Pat Harris, who tragically died in a road traffic accident on 19 June 2012. A leading light on the model bus scene, Pat - who died aged 74 - and his Midland Red themed diorama were a regular and welcome sight in many exhibition halls and tents around Gloucestershire and beyond. A professional in the 12" to the foot coach industry for many years, Pat would also attend running days and rallies and I last saw him at the old Cheltenham St Margaret's bus station on Sunday 27 May 2012. Pat always had time for everyone and I for one will miss his ready wit, informed opinion and hilarious anecdotes. We will not see his like again.I was both pleased and moved to see Martin Nash continuing and expanding the work of Pat Harris, who tragically died in a road traffic accident on 19 June 2012.  A leading light on the model bus scene, Pat – who died aged 74 – and his Midland Red themed diorama were a regular and welcome sight in many exhibition halls and tents around Gloucestershire and beyond.  A professional in the 12″ to the foot coach industry for many years, Pat would also attend running days and rallies and I last saw him at the old Cheltenham St Margaret’s bus station on Sunday 27 May 2012.  Pat always had time for everyone and I for one will miss his ready wit, informed opinion and hilarious anecdotes.  We will not see his like again.

In particular I liked the way that Martin had included details such as the non-aligned roof ridges of houses bombed during World War 2 and the convoy of Bristol Greyhound Bristol MW coaches heading for Southsea.In particular I liked the way that Martin had included details such as the non-aligned roof ridges of houses bombed during World War 2 and the convoy of Bristol Greyhound liveried Bristol MW coaches (EFE 16201) heading for Southsea.

Greyhound Motors, was founded in Bristol in 1921 and is credited with operating United Kingdom’s first scheduled Motor Coach service (with advertised times and intermediate stops) between Bristol and London. In 1928, the company was purchased by Bristol Tramways (the forerunner of one of Britain’s largest bus companies, Bristol Omnibus Company). The trading name of Bristol Greyhound, and Greyhound’s cream and red livery were adopted for Bristol Omnibus Company’s express coach services and were used until the formation of National Bus Company in 1970. From 1972, all semblance of constituent companies identities were swept away, to be replaced by a universal application of National Express branding on an unrelieved white livery.

MODEL BUS FEDERATION AND NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT MODELLERS 

Represented by Paul and David Mellor

4mm Scale

It is always a joy to be re-united with The Mellor Brothers and their ever expanding fleets of local buses and lorries. It is always a joy to be re-united with The Mellor Brothers and their ever expanding fleets of local buses and lorries – a sentiment now shared by many professional decision makers in Gloucestershire’s transport and logistics community. On this occasion, the line up on the shelves included the first three articulated lorries – two Scanias and a DAF – owned by Cheltenham based Ralph Davies of Cheltenham.

Meanwhile, at the River View Cafe, the loads of one Atkinson and one Seddon Atkinson articulated lorries reflected the changing face of freight handling in the 1960s.Meanwhile, at the River View Cafe, the loads of one Atkinson and one Seddon Atkinson articulated lorries reflected the changing face of freight handling in the 1960s.

Piled high with empty wooden pallets was a flatbed trailer in the livery of M. S. Ellis of Bristol Road, Cambridge.  Ellis Transport Ltd was founded by Mike Ellis in 1980 whilst working as a car salesman at a local Ford dealer. The opportunity arose to buy a second hand transit truck and a local plastics company gave him his first job – running washing machine lids from Gloucester to Hotpoints at Llandudno.  The carmine and cream Thornhills flatbed meanwhile carries two twenty foot intermodal shipping containers – a concept which revolutionised freight handling around the World.

 

TRAVEL 2000

by Andy Peckham

4mm Scale

Similarly, Andy Peckham’s Travel 2000 always has something new and interesting to offer whether the spectator looks at the School Bus, Wedding Hire, local service bus or long distance executive hire fleet. Similarly, Andy Peckham’s Travel 2000 always has something new and interesting to offer whether the spectator looks at the School Bus, Wedding Hire, local service bus or long distance executive hire fleet.  Travel 2000 also trades as Provincial, Concept 2000 and Black and White  and its headquarters is based on a real location – formerly used by a car rental company – on a straight flat single carriageway road in Hucclecote, Gloucester.  Fuelling is undertaken at local filling stations due to residential objections to an on site fuel storage tank.

CLIC_2015A_Travel 2000_Optare CheetahAmong the smaller luxury coaches in the Black and White fleet was this Plaxton Cheetah. The Cheetah has remained one of Britain’s best-selling small coaches and since its launch in 1997 has remained a style leader, despite facing growing competition from the likes of the Sitcar Beluga and Optare Toro which, like the Cheetah, are purpose-built coaches on the Mercedes-Benz Vario chassis.

 

 

MINI SCENES

St Margaret’s Hall welcomed the return of Redditch based Tracey Lippett and her Mini Scenes: dioramas including rocks, cliffs, streams, bogs and other water features and also often featuring Minis and other classic British cars as well as flying saucers and aliens! Tracey is also keen to help other modellers with their tricky scenic issues and can be emailed on Reddmini@aol.com.In October  2015 St Margaret’s Hall also welcomed the return of Redditch based Tracey Lippett and her Mini Scenes: dioramas including rocks, cliffs, streams, bogs and other water features and also often featuring Minis and other classic British cars as well as flying saucers and aliens!  Tracey is also keen to help other modellers with their tricky scenic issues and can be emailed on Reddmini@aol.com.  In the view above London & North Eastern Railway B1 Class 4-6-0 1234 is seen hauling what might be considered an out of gauge saucer load on a flat wagon between two tankers.

MODELLING DEMONSTRATION

by Richard Bucknall, Trevor Hale, Mark Begley and Andi Dell

The April 2015 Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Exhibition also featured trade support from Cheltenham Model Centre, Clive Reid’s pre-enjoyed model railways and Stewart Blencowe’s Railway timetables, books, photos and slides.The October 2015 – and final – Cheltenham GWR Modeller’s Exhibition in aid of CLIC Sargeant also featured trade support from Cheltenham Model Centre, Clive Reid’s pre-enjoyed model railways and  Stewart Blencowe’s Railway timetables, books, photos and slides.

Thanks must also go to Robert Webb for displaying his Digital Command Control demonstration layout featuring English Electric Class 37 Co-Co 37 012 “Loch Rannoch”, 47 582 "County of Norfolk" and a number of expertly weathered HAA coal hopper wagons.Thanks must also go to Robert Webb for displaying his Digital Command Control demonstration layout featuring English Electric Class 37 Co-Co 37 012 “Loch Rannoch”, 47 582 “County of Norfolk” and a number of expertly weathered HAA coal hopper wagons.

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