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 ROLLING STOCK


THE MUNRO DOCTRINE


As described in Terminal 1 : On The Wings of Friendship, my N gauge airport station layout module was designed and built to the maximum length possible that I could both transport and store - given that all the trains using it could be driven from both ends. However, although both visible platform area and hidden track lengths could - at 700mm apiece - just about hold a four car Class 220 Voyager unit I found that no train based on the 75 feet long Mark III carriage was truly hidden from view unless it was some distance back in the darkness from the "Welcome" sign.


As described in Terminal 1 : On The Wings of Friendship, my N gauge airport station layout module was designed and built to the maximum length possible that I could both transport and store - given that all the trains using it could be driven from both ends. However, although both visible platform area and hidden track lengths could - at 700mm apiece - just about hold a four car Class 220 Voyager unit I found that no train based on the 75 feet long Mark III carriage was truly hidden from view unless it was some distance back in the darkness from the "Welcome" sign.  

For that reason I decided to impose a rule of using only three, two or one vehicle trains of this type - exceptions being made for trains using shorter carriages of either modern or preserved types: hence the four car lash-up of Metropolitan Cammell Class 101 vehicles and both the InterCity Swallow and Wrexham and Shropshire trains comprising two Mark III carriages, a shorter Mark III Driving Van Trailer and a diesel locomotive.

I also decided to call this rule The Munro Doctrine after the hostess of the popular British TV quiz show "3-2-1" Caroline Munro ( pictured above ) who I had the pleasure of meeting in 2007.  And because she is a lot prettier than Ted Rogers or Dusty Bin!


THE NEW ADVENTURES OF METROPOLITAN CAMMELL CLASS 101


Along with the later Derby Lightweight designs, the Metropolitan Cammell Class 101 is one of the best known and most easily recognised of British Railway's first generation of diesel mechanical multiple units. Built at Washwood Heath, Birmingham, fom 1956 to 1959, the final five units were not withdrawn until 24 December 2003 - making them historically valid for use at Terminal 1 although perhaps not in the BR blue/grey of my own two car set ( pictured above ) or in the Network South East markings of the four dummy vehicles kindly lent to me by Paul Elliot.


Along with the later Derby Lightweight designs, the Metropolitan Cammell Class 101 is one of the best known and most easily recognised of British Railway's first generation of diesel mechanical multiple units.  Built at Washwood Heath, Birmingham, fom 1956 to 1959, the final five units were not withdrawn until 24 December 2003 - making them historically valid for use at Terminal 1 although perhaps not in the BR blue/grey of my own Bachmann Class 108 two car set (53959 and 54243 pictured above ) or in the Network South East markings of the four dummy vehicles ( 51499 and 59570 twice ) kindly lent to me by Paul Elliot.

The four unpowered NSE vehicles could be marshalled into a rake of two driving cars and so form a suitably short train propelled into and hauled out of Terminal 1 by my own power/trailer set.  However, although this could be explained as an enthusiasts special I realised that a small non-invasive modification could make the four vehicle train even more entertaining.


Compared to the tension lock couplings used on my existing 4mm scale Capital Works layout, N gauge knuckle couplers will unite much more easily and then not come apart. This is a desirable feature for most operations, but prohibits any kind of fly-shunting or motive power propelling unpowered rolling stock to a position where it has to be left.


Compared to the tension lock couplings used on my existing 4mm scale Capital Works layout, N gauge knuckle couplers will unite much more easily and then not come apart.  This is a desirable feature for most operations, but prohibits any kind of fly-shunting or motive power propelling unpowered rolling stock to a position where it has to be left.

Thinking that it would be nice to have my BR liveried Class 108 propel Paul's NSE vehicles into Terminal 1 and then leave them - in the way that pairs of DMU sets often split, especially at junction stations - I devised a sleeve that would allow an N gauge coupler to act like a buffer.  Made of plastic card and painted black, this covered the coupling's jaw and prevented it from moving either left or right.  As a result, the BR DMU could firstly insert the NSE vehicles into Terminal 1 and then leave them before coming back later - without the sleeve - to pick them up again.

This sleeve and the activity it enables is shown in the still and moving photographs above and below. Due to the detail differences betwen various vehicles and the precise dimensions of their couplings, different sleeves would have to be made for different locomotives, carriages and wagons.


This sleeve and the activity it enables is shown in the still and moving photographs above and below. Due to the detail differences betwen various vehicles and the precise dimensions of their couplings, different sleeves would have to be made for different locomotives, carriages and wagons.


This sleeve and the activity it enables is shown in the still and moving photographs above and below. Due to the detail differences betwen various vehicles and the precise dimensions of their couplings, different sleeves would have to be made for different locomotives, carriages and wagons.


This sleeve and the activity it enables is shown in the still and moving photographs above and below. Due to the detail differences betwen various vehicles and the precise dimensions of their couplings, different sleeves would have to be made for different locomotives, carriages and wagons.


This sleeve and the activity it enables is shown in the still and moving photographs above and below. Due to the detail differences betwen various vehicles and the precise dimensions of their couplings, different sleeves would have to be made for different locomotives, carriages and wagons.






INTERCITY SWALLOW TRAINS PLC


Apart from vinyl manufacturers and lawyers, some of the beneficiaries of the post 1994 Privatization of British Railways have been train operating companies using open access agreements to provide services otherwise ignored by larger firms.  Examples of these TOCs include Hull trains - providing direct Hull to Kings Cross services along the East Coast Main Line dominated by GNER and then National Express - and Wrexham and Shropshire, linking Wrexham, Telford and Banbury with Marylebone in the face of opposition from Virgin West Coast.


Apart from vinyl manufacturers and lawyers, some of the beneficiaries of the post 1994 Privatization of British Railways have been train operating companies using open access agreements to provide services otherwise ignored by larger firms.  Examples of these TOCs include Hull trains - providing direct Hull to Kings Cross services along the East Coast Main Line dominated by GNER and then National Express - and Wrexham and Shropshire, linking Wrexham, Telford and Banbury with Marylebone in the face of opposition from Virgin West Coast.  

While Hull Trains operate a fleet of diesel hydraulic multiple units, Wrexham and Shropshire with its semi fixed formation rakes of Mark III carriages, DVTs and silver Class 67 diesel electric locomotives was the inspiration for my fictional InterCity Swallow Trains - connecting Terminal 1 of Britain's newest airport with other major cities.  The short length and makeup of these trains suggests that they operate frequently over not too long distances, offering plenty of room for both First and Standard Class passenger's bicycles, skis and other holiday luggage.

The regular presence of electro diesel motive power also suggests the nearby presence of 750v dc third rail electrification - if not south east England then perhaps Cheshire and Merseyside?  In either case, just as Wrexham and Shropshire have championed the British Rail blue and grey of the 1960s for their carriages, so InterCity Swallow have taken their name from the final version of the BR livery variant for high speed trains adopted in the 1980s.

In reality I wanted a modern push-pull set to contrast with the abundance of DMUs and the only Mark III DVT options were either Swallow or Virgin.  As Virgin have now moved on to Voyagers and Pendolinos I thought a deliberately retro look would date less.


While marshalling the carriages of the InterCity Swallow train was easy enough, finding suitable motive power was harder and suitable motive power in matching livery so far impossible!  Paul very kindly loaned me a model of 33 035 "Spitfire" ( top) in Network South East markings although this lacked the external jumper cables of the Class 33/1 subclass.  As a result I kept the Crompton in reserve and invested in the Graham Farish model of 73 114 "Stewart's Lane Traction Maintenance Depot", complete with Battersea Power Station depot diamonds on the cabside and mid blue Mainline livery.  73 114's presence at Terminal 1 assumes that it has been restored to mainline running condition ( not without precedent ) and brought back to Network Rail from Leicestershire's Battlefield Line, its home since 1999.


While marshalling the carriages of the InterCity Swallow train was easy enough, finding suitable motive power was harder and suitable motive power in matching livery so far impossible!  Paul very kindly loaned me a model of 33 035 "Spitfire" in Network South East markings although this lacked the external jumper cables of the Class 33/1 subclass.  As a result I kept the Crompton in reserve and invested in the Graham Farish model of 73 114 "Stewart's Lane Traction Maintenance Depot", complete with Battersea Power Station depot diamonds on the cabside and mid blue Mainline livery.  73 114's presence at Terminal 1 assumes that it has been restored to mainline running condition ( not without precedent ) and brought back to Network Rail from Leicestershire's Battlefield Line, its home since 1999.


While marshalling the carriages of the InterCity Swallow train was easy enough, finding suitable motive power was harder and suitable motive power in matching livery so far impossible!  Paul very kindly loaned me a model of 33 035 "Spitfire" ( top) in Network South East markings although this lacked the external jumper cables of the Class 33/1 subclass.  As a result I kept the Crompton in reserve and invested in the Graham Farish model of 73 114 "Stewart's Lane Traction Maintenance Depot", complete with Battersea Power Station depot diamonds on the cabside and mid blue Mainline livery.  73 114's presence at Terminal 1 assumes that it has been restored to mainline running condition ( not without precedent ) and brought back to Network Rail from Leicestershire's Battlefield Line, its home since 1999.


Mark III Trailer First 41036 last appeared in the Platform 5 Locomotives & Coaching Stock book in 2008 as a Midland Mainline HST liveried vehicle stored by Angel Trains at Edinburgh Craigentinny and featuring a disabled toilet.  The 33.66 tonne vehicle was built at BR Derby  as part of Lot 30881 during 1976-77.


Mark III Trailer First 41036 last appeared in the Platform 5 Locomotives & Coaching Stock book in 2008 as a Midland Mainline HST liveried vehicle stored by Angel Trains at Edinburgh Craigentinny and featuring a disabled toilet.  The 33.66 tonne vehicle was built at BR Derby  as part of Lot 30881 during 1976-77 and, like 44018 below, I am imagining that 41036 has been fitted with buffers for its new role.




Mark III Trailer Guard Second 44018 meanwhile is also owned by Angel Trains but, in reality, is still Coach A in   HST set LA03, based at Plymouth Laira depot and marked in First Great Western's "Dynamic Lines" livery.  Built in 1980-82 at Derby as part of Lot 30949, the 33.47 tonne TGS has been refurbished with Grammer seating and a trolley store in place of the toilet.




Mark III Trailer Guard Second 44018 meanwhile is also owned by Angel Trains but, in reality, is still Coach A in  HST set LA03, based at Plymouth Laira depot and marked in First Great Western's "Dynamic Lines" livery.  Built in 1980-82 at Derby as part of Lot 30949, the 33.47 tonne TGS has been refurbished with Grammer seating and a trolley store in place of the toilet.




Mark IIIb Driving Brake Van 82132 however is owned by Porterbrook Leasing and, in the real world, has long traded its old West Coast stamping ground for Norwich Crown Point depot and National Express East Anglia services to London Liverpool Street in a modification of the flamboyant "One" livery, as sometimes worn by 47 818 at Gloucester station.  Cleared to run at 110 mph, the 1988 vintage Derby built vehicle tips the scales at 45.18 tonnes.




Mark IIIb Driving Brake Van 82132 however is owned by Porterbrook Leasing and, in the real world, has long traded its old West Coast stamping ground for Norwich Crown Point depot and National Express East Anglia services to London Liverpool Street in a modification of the flamboyant "One" livery, as sometimes worn by 47 818 at Gloucester station.  Cleared to run at 110 mph, the 1988 vintage Derby built vehicle tips the scales at 45.18 tonnes.




FIRST NORTH WESTERN 158 758




After Privatization in 1997 Regional Railways North West became North Western Trains Company Ltd and its seven year operating franchise was awarded to Great Western Holdings. On 1 April 1998, North Western Trains Company Ltd was bought out by FirstGroup plc and became First North Western, based in Manchester with trains operating from Newton Heath depot.




Thanks to the generosity of Paul, I now own 158 758 along with 159 007 and the Class 155 depicted below.  In 2009 158 758 is running as a three car unit with the insertion of Motor Second Lavatory 58714 an carries the deep blue, lilac and white livery of Northern Rail.

First North Western started life as Regional Railways North West - also known as Network North West for a short time - when it was part of British Rail. 

After Privatization in 1997 Regional Railways North West became North Western Trains Company Ltd and its seven year operating franchise was awarded to Great Western Holdings. On 1 April 1998, North Western Trains Company Ltd was bought out by FirstGroup plc and became First North Western, based in Manchester. 

FirstGroup plc, is a UK-based  international passenger transport group with an annual turnover of 2 billion and 50,000 employees across the UK and USA.  First is also the UK’s largest bus operator, runs one fifth of Britain’s passenger rail network and is London’s only tram operator. 

From 2004 former First North Western services have been mainly operated by Northern Rail  with Manchester Airport to Barrow-in Furness, Blackpool North and Windermere services now operated by First Transpennine Express.  Similarly, former First North Western services to Wales and Cheshire are now operated by Arriva Trains Wales.





Porterbrook owned 52758 ( above)  and 57758 ( below) were built as - respectively - Driving Motor Standard Lavatory B and A vehicles by BREL Derby between 1989 and 1992.  Each is made from welded aluminium and powered by a Cummins NTA855R diesel developing 350 bhp at 1900 rpm.  However, by 2000 52758 had been converted to Driving Motor Composite Lavatory specification and would have sported a red stripe over its First Class accommodation.



Porterbrook owned 52758 ( above)  and 57758 ( below) were built as - respectively - Driving Motor Standard Lavatory B and A vehicles by BREL Derby between 1989 and 1992.  Each is made from welded aluminium and powered by a Cummins NTA855R diesel developing 350 bhp at 1900 rpm and coupled to a Voith hydraulic transmission.  However, by 2000 52758 had been converted to Driving Motor Composite Lavatory specification and would have sported a red stripe over its First Class accommodation.




Porterbrook owned 52758 ( above)  and 57758 ( below) were built as - respectively - Driving Motor Standard Lavatory B and A vehicles by BREL Derby between 1989 and 1992.  Each is made from welded aluminium and powered by a Cummins NTA855R diesel developing 350 bhp at 1900 rpm.  However, by 2000 52758 had been converted to Driving Motor Composite Lavatory specification and would have sported a red stripe over its First Class accommodation.




MIDLAND MAIN LINE 170 105




In 2009 170 105 is running as a three car set, centred on Motor Second 55105, with the Porterbrook owned Tyseley based diesel hydraulic multiple unit now displaying Arriva Cross Country markings.  However, this Adtranz (Derby) built train was one of a class that quietly revolutionised rail passenger transport in the East Midlands.


In 2009 170 105 is running as a three car set, centred on Motor Second 55105, with the Porterbrook owned Tyseley based diesel hydraulic multiple unit now displaying Arriva Cross Country markings.  However, this Adtranz (Derby) built train was one of a class that quietly revolutionised rail passenger transport in the East Midlands.

Derby based Midland Mainline (MML) was owned by the National Express Group and operated from April 1996 to November 2007 offering fast and semi-fast services from London St Pancras to  Sheffield, Derby and Nottingham with some trains going as far north as York.  Until 1999 Midland Mainline operated Class 43 powered High Speed Trains, running at only 110 mph and with frequent stops due to the nature of the line and its stations.  As a result, it was easier to reach most places on Midland Mainline by using either West or East Coast Main Lines and changing trains.

 In 1999 however a new timetable was introduced along with Class 170 Turbostars, which Midland Mainline had first among all of the Train Operating Companies to operate in 1998.  MML ordered a fleet of seventeen 2-car Class 170/1 units, although the first ten were subsequently made-up to 3-cars. 

However,  although the welded aluminium trains allowed service frequency to double they were a victim of their own success as they were too slow - at 100 mph - and too small for the rise in passenger numbers. For this reason 125mph Class 222 Meridian diesel electric multiple units were ordered from Bombardier ( as Adtranz had become ) and built in Brugge, Belgium, in 2004-5.  On 22 June 2007 the Department for Transport announced that Midland Mainline had lost its geographical franchise from 11 November 2007 to East Midlands Trains, operated by the Stagecoach Group.



However,  although the welded aluminium trains allowed service frequency to double they were a victim of their own success as they were too slow - at 100 mph - and too small for the rise in passenger numbers. For this reason 125mph Class 222 Meridian diesel electric multiple units were ordered from Bombardier ( a Adtranz had become ) and built in Brugge, Belgium, in 2004-5.  On 22 June 2007 the Department for Transport announced that Midland Mainline had lost its geographical franchise from 11 November 2007 to East Midlands Trains, operated by the Stagecoach Group.


DMCL (A) and DMCL (B)  50105 and 79105 represent a continuation of the design used in the British Rail Class 165, 165 and 168 Networker turbos although the Class 170 vehicles use ZF final drive and MTU engines rather than Gmeinder final drive and Perkins powerplants around a Voith hydraulic transmission.  All vehicles are powered by underfloor engines with one bogie per coach addressing torque to the rails and the Class 170 sets can work in multiple with others numbered from Class 150 upwards to themselves. However, unlike the Class 158s  - seen above - they are only gangwayed within themselves.



DMCL (A) and DMCL (B)  50105 and 79105 represent a continuation of the design used in the British Rail Class 165, 165 and 168 Networker turbos although the Class 170 vehicles use ZF final drive and MTU engines rather than Gmeinder final drive and Perkins powerplants around a Voith hydraulic transmission.  All vehicles are powered by underfloor engines with one bogie per coach addressing torque to the rails and the Class 170 sets can work in multiple with others numbered from Class 150 upwards to themselves. However, unlike the Class 158s  - seen above - they are only gangwayed within themselves.


NETWORK SOUTH EAST 159 007


In 2009 159 007 is running as a three car set in the livery of Stagecoach owned South West Trains and based at Salisbury.  The Porterbrook owned train was part of a batch of 1992 vintage Derby built Class 158s converted to Class 159 standard by Babcock at Rosyth Dockyard, Scotland, for use by what at the time was still British Rail's Network South East.


In 2009 159 007 is running as a three car set in the livery of Stagecoach owned South West Trains and based at Salisbury.  The Porterbrook owned train was part of a batch of 1992 vintage Derby built Class 158s converted to Class 159 standard by Babcock at Rosyth Dockyard, Scotland, for use by what at the time was still British Rail's Network South East.


On Terminal 1 DMSL 75879 ( above )  and DMCL 52879 ( below ) are seen running as a power twin but a replacement example of Motor Second Lavatory 58724 is being sought.


On Terminal 1 DMSL 75879 ( above )  and DMCL 52879 ( below ) are seen running as a power twin but a replacement example of Motor Second Lavatory 58724 is being sought.

Twenty-two 3-car units were built for Network SouthEast's London Waterloo via Salisbury and Yeovil to Exeter route to replace Class 47 and Class 50 locomotive hauled passenger trains. Unlike Regional Railways units, Class 159s were fitted with four step braking and initially could not work in multiple with any other class.

The Rosyth rebuild was required as Regional Railways had over-ordered Class 158s, just as Network SouthEast was looking for a similar number of new diesel units but it was not possible for Network SouthEast and BREL to agree terms on the variation order to NSE specification.  Babcock's mission was to fit first class accommodation, retention toilets and other modifications.

In 2007, eight further Class 159 units were created through the rebuilding of surplus Class 158 units displaced from Transpennine Express.



Twenty-two 3-car units were built for Network SouthEast's London Waterloo via Salisbury and Yeovil to Exeter route to replace Class 47 and Class 50 locomotive hauled passenger trains. Unlike Regional Railways units, Class 159s were fitted with four step braking and initially could not work in multiple with any other class.


TRANS PENNINE EXPRESS 158 811


158 811 last appeared in Platform 5's Locomotives and Coaching Stock 2006 edition as a First TransPennine operated Porterbrook asset based at Heaton depot in Newcastle.


158 811 last appeared in Platform 5's Locomotives and Coaching Stock 2006 edition as a First TransPennine operated Porterbrook asset based at Heaton depot in Newcastle.

However, the markings of the Graham Farish model seen here reflect the original branding launched in late 1998 by Train Operating Company Northern Spirit and continued by its successor Arriva Trains Northern from September 2001.  On 1 February 2004 though TransPennine Express became a separate franchise allocated to First Group and Keolis, leading to the addition of a First Group indigo blue lower bodyside band.

With many of its services terminating at Manchester Airport, First TransPennine Express is one of the few train operating companies in the United Kingdom running 24 hours a day, including through New Year's Eve night. For example, trains run between York and the former RAF Ringway at least every three hours every night of the week.

The technical details of the Driving Motor Second Lavatory 52811, Motor Second Lavatory 58711 and Driving Motor Composite Lavatory 57811 ( pictured in order below ) are similar to those of 158 758 pictured above in the First North Westerncolours that would also have been carried during 1998 - 2004.



The technical details of the Driving Motor Second Lavatory 52811, Motor Second Lavatory 58711 and Driving Motor Composite Lavatory 57811 ( pictured in order below ) are similar to those of 158 758 pictured above in the First North Westerncolours that would also have been carried during 1998 - 2004.


The technical details of the Driving Motor Second Lavatory 52811, Motor Second Lavatory 58711 and Driving Motor Composite Lavatory 57811 ( pictured in order below ) are similar to those of 158 758 pictured above in the First North Westerncolours that would also have been carried during 1998 - 2004.


The technical details of the Driving Motor Second Lavatory 52811, Motor Second Lavatory 58711 and Driving Motor Composite Lavatory 57811 ( pictured in order below ) are similar to those of 158 758 pictured above in the First North Westerncolours that would also have been carried during 1998 - 2004.


WEST YORKSHIRE PASSENGER TRANSPORT EXECUTIVE CLASS 155


One of the few trains featured in this article not to be built in either Birmingham or Derby is this 1988 vintage Leyland Bus Class 155 Super Sprinter, constructed with an aluminium roof and body based on a Leyland National bus attached to a bogied steel underframe.  As such it represents a link between the Class 143 Pacers - introduced earlier in the 1980s - and the more sophisticated second generation diesel multiple units described above. However, from 1991, large numbers of Class 155 vehicles were converted to single car Class 153 DMSL s - with a cab at each end - by Hunslet-Barclay of Kilmarnock.


One of the few trains featured in this article not to be built in either Birmingham or Derby is this 1988 vintage Leyland Bus Class 155 Super Sprinter, constructed with an aluminium roof and body based on a Leyland National bus attached to a bogied steel underframe.  As such it represents a link between the Class 143 Pacers - introduced earlier in the 1980s - and the more sophisticated second generation diesel multiple units described above. However, from 1991, large numbers of Class 155 vehicles were converted to single car Class 153 DMSL s - with a cab at each end - by Hunslet-Barclay of Kilmarnock.

In 2009 the 285 bhp Cummins powered vehicles were marshalled as DMSL-DMS power twins in the deep blue, lilac and white livery of Northern Rail although unusually they are owned by West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive but managed by Porterbrook Leasing Company.  They remained in the red and cream "Metro Train" livery seen above and below until 2008.


In 2009 the 285 bhp Cummins powered vehicles were marshalled as DMSL-DMS power twins in the deep blue, lilac and white livery of Northern Rail although unusually they are owned by West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive but managed by Porterbrook Leasing Company.  They remained in the red and cream "Metro Train" livery seen above and below until 2008.


In 2009 the 285 bhp Cummins powered vehicles were marshalled as DMSL-DMS power twins in the deep blue, lilac and white livery of Northern Rail although unusually they are owned by West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive but managed by Porterbrook Leasing Company.  They remained in the red and cream "Metro Train" livery seen above and below until 2008.


BERRY WIGGINS TANK WAGON 118


Not a vehicle that would normally be seen at a passenger station without a run-round loop, but I have included this Berry Wiggins tank wagon to illustrate the piece of Platform 1 that I have left deliberately plain as a photographic backdrop for such one-off locomotives, carriages and wagons.


Not a vehicle that would normally be seen at a passenger station without a run-round loop, but I have included this Berry Wiggins tank wagon to illustrate the piece of Platform 1 that I have left deliberately plain as a photographic backdrop for such one-off locomotives, carriages and wagons.