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RAILWAY OPERATING DEPARTMENT

 
 

CAPITAL WORKS

 
 

GUEST MOTIVE POWER

 
 

 

   
  LANCASHIRE & YORKSHIRE RAILWAY ASPINALL CLASS B7 0-4-0ST  
 

 

   
 

Although Capital Works primarily provides an arena for my collection of 4mm scale short wheelbase rolling stock - dominated by private owner coal wagons built by The Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company Limited - much exhibition attention has been focussed on the motive power used to move these vehicles in and out of the North London based engineering firm of Morland and Anderson.

 
 

 

   
  Although Capital Works primarily provides an arena for my collection of 4mm scale short wheelbase rolling stock - dominated by private owner coal wagons built by The Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company Limited - much exhibition attention has been focussed on the motive power used to move these vehicles in and out of the North London based engineering firm of Morland and Anderson.

As discussed on other pages on this website, six coupled steam locomotives such as Great Western pannier tanks, LBSCR "Terriers", Austerity saddle tanks and even an ex North British J83 are regularly used although the one example of the Bachmann Class 04 Drewery diesel mechanical shunter I once tested proved too weak even to clear the points! This could have been a one-off sub-standard model and I would be more than willing to repeat the experiment, but while I was displaying Capital Works at the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Steam and Vintage Gala on 11 and 12 October 2008 I was kindly loaned the Dapol model of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway's Class B7 0-4-0ST.

This came from my good friend Roger Webb, who was displaying his working model fairground in the model tent at Prestbury and had previously contributed an RE single deck bus to my display of Bristol aircraft and vehicles and had gone to considerable trouble to allow me to photograph his model of D0280 "Falcon". On this occasion however I was able to thank Roger for reuniting me with a model that had always worked well on a layout I had built at home in the 1980s and if anything worked even better now.

Like the example that I now regret selling, Roger's Dapol "Pug" carried BR black livery with the early "lion on a bike" crest and was numbered 51241. Although the markings were too late for the private owner wagons, it provided a perfect substitute for the Brighton A1X in terms of sure-footedly taking stock out of Capital Works and drew much attention from younger visitors - not least because it was barely bigger than the trucks!

 
 

 

   
 

Like the example that I now regret selling, Roger's Dapol "Pug" carried BR black livery with the early "lion on a bike" crest and was numbered 51241. Although the markings were too late for the private owner wagons, it provided a perfect substitute for the Brighton A1X in terms of sure-footedly taking stock out of Capital Works and drew much attention from younger visitors - not least because it was barely bigger than the trucks!

 
 

 

   
   
Apart from being such a steady slow-speed performer, my main memories of Dapol's "Pug" from the 1980s was that this 1891 vintage design built at Horwich Works was finally available as a ready to run model. Before that, a friend and I had even considered motorising a BR guards van and letting that run permanently coupled to the plastic kit version of John Aspinall's saddle tank.

In fact it was the Rosebud Kitmaster model ( with moulds later passed to Airfix and then on to Dapol ) that would spread the fame of this tiny 21 ton 5cwt locomotive. Not only was the plastic representation of 51212 small enough to fit the same Series 1 box as the Presflo and Cattle Wagon but - as chassis, boiler/tank and cab were all assembled separately - it was to form the basis of many conversions to other small steam locomotives.

As was the case with Airfix's Schools, Bulleid Pacific and 9F kits, there were also a number of preserved examples of the real "0F" B7. Perhaps the best known of these is 51218 ( LMS number 11218 ), built as Horwich works number 811 in 1901 and first turning its 3' 3/8" disc wheels on the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway in 1964.

With covered-in slide bars next to their two outside 13" x 18" cylinders fed by steam at 160 psi, the 57 strong B7 class eventually offered 11 335 lb of tractive effort as far afield as Agecroft and Speke Junction while 51218 made it all the way to Swansea!

 
 

 

   
  With covered-in slide bars next to their two outside 13" x 18" cylinders fed by steam at 160 psi, the 57 strong B7 class eventually offered 11 335 lb of tractive effort as far afield as Agecroft and Speke Junction while 51218 made it all the way to Swansea!  
 

 

   
  Happily, since the article above was written, I have once again acquired my own version of the powered Dapol model which carries the number 19 in the centre of a plate which reads "L&Y Ry Co Makers Horwich 1910". 

In 1923 this locomotive became LMS number 11243, but was sold in 1931 to John Mowlem for use on a major contract at Southampton Docks where she was named ‘Bassett’. Four years later she was moved to London, was re-named ‘Prince’ and operated at the Charlton works of United Glass Bottle Manufacturers Ltd, whose site is now occupied by the O2 Arena, formerly the Millennium Dome.

Number 19 came into preservation in the late 1960s, being purchased by the L&YR Society at Haworth. She was loaned as a static exhibit to Southport Steam Centre and is now on the site of its successor, the Ribble Steam Railway Museum at Preston Docks.

My own model was later to appear in a presentation on British Steam on Universal Works 2.0.  A spare engine in later LMS or BR markings would also be a welcome addition to the locomotive stud!

 
 

 

   
  GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY 633 CLASS 0-6-0T  
 

 

   
 

It is always rewarding to see a skilled modeller at work and among his wagons and carriages at Eastcombe in 2010 Gloucester Model Railway Club's Ken Haines displayed Great Western Railway 0-6-0T 635, the first of twelve similar tank engines outshopped from Stafford Road, Wolverhampton to Lot M.  Among the 633 Class, 633-636 ( works numbers 167-170) and 638-644 ( works numbers 172-178 ) were new build with 637 being converted from a former Rhondda and Swansea Bay Railway 0-6-0T and given the works number 171.

 
 

 

   
  It is always rewarding to see a skilled modeller at work and among his wagons and carriages at Eastcombe in 2010 Gloucester Model Railway Club's Ken Haines displayed Great Western Railway 0-6-0T 635, the first of twelve similar tank engines outshopped from Stafford Road, Wolverhampton to Lot M.  Among the 633 Class, 633-636 ( works numbers 167-170) and 638-644 ( works numbers 172-178 ) were new build with 637 being converted from a former Rhondda and Swansea Bay Railway 0-6-0T and given the works number 171.

633 was introduced to Paddington depot in November 1871 and withdrawn from there in October 1933. 635 arrived a month later but only lasted at Paddington until August 1928.

Half the class was similarly to spend most of its life in the London area although other examples served as far away as Frome and Swansea. Several engines - including 633, 634, 641, 642 and 643 - had their 980 gallon tanks fitted with condensing apparatus for working over the Metropolitan Line.

 
 

 

   
 
Number Introduced 1922 Shed Last GWR Shed Withdrawn
633 November 1871 Paddington Paddington October 1933
634 November 1871 Paddington Paddington March 1934
635 December 1871 Paddington Paddington August 1928
636 December 1871 Neath Goodwick March 1933
637 December 1871 Danygraig Goodwick June 1934
638 January 1872 Frome Frome September 1930
639 January 1872 Pontypool Goodwick March 1934
640 February 1872 Swansea East Dock Goodwick May 1934
641 February 1872 Paddington Paddington November 1933
642 March 1872 Paddington Paddington March 1934
643 March 1872 Paddington Paddington February 1934
644 April 1872 Carmarthen Goodwick February 1932
 
 

 

   
  When first built the 633 Class had round topped fireboxes, Wolverhampton designed W3 boilers and bell mouthed chimneys but were rebuilt between 1887 and 1899 with either S2 or S4 boilers before the B4 version with a Belpaire firebox - as depicted in Ken's model - became standard. This final version conformed to GWR Diagram A62 with tank capacity reduced to 920 gallons. Although none of the condensing 633 Class ever received cabs, a number of non-condensing locomotives were so equipped.  
 

 

   
 

When first built the 633 Class had round topped fireboxes, Wolverhampton designed W3 boilers and bell mouthed chimneys but were rebuilt between 1887 and 1899 with either S2 or S4 boilers before the B4 version with a Belpaire firebox - as depicted in Ken's model - became standard. This final version conformed to GWR Diagram A62 with tank capacity reduced to 920 gallons. Although none of the condensing 633 Class ever received cabs, a number of non-condensing locomotives were so equipped.

 
 

 

   
  As befitted its beautifully appointed exterior, Ken's model of 635 was also a smooth runner when kindly loaned for the Gloucester Model Railway Show at Hucclecote in 2011. The problem of attaching tension lock coupling fitted wagons to a locomotive built with three link couplings was solved with a simple removable bar made of stiff brass wire hooked over the buffer shanks.  Operationally though, 635 had to be backed up to the output portal in such a way that the waiting wagon could be hooked on to the bar and then pulled back a few millimetres to check that the hook was positively engaged.  Otherwise the wagon would be left behind as 635 - with its non-rigid bar - was powered up and moved forward.

It is hoped to feature 635 in future presentations alongside other Great Western tank engines of its era.