Home

CHELTENHAM GWR MODELLERS GROUP

MODEL RAILWAY EXHIBITION

SATURDAY 14 APRIL AND SUNDAY 15 APRIL 2007

 
 

   
  THE NEXT EXHIBITION WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY 25 AND SUNDAY 26 OCTOBER 2014
 
 

   
 

Click here for Introduction and future exhibition information

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2005

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2005

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2005

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2005

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2006

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2006

 
 

   
  Click on picture for review of October 2006  
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2006

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2007

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2007

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2008

 
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2008

 
 

   
  Click on picture for review of October 2008  
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2008

 
 

   
  Click on picture for review of April 2009  
 

   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2009

 
 

   
     


Click on picture for review of October 2009


Click on picture for review of April 2010

Click on picture for review of April 2010
   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2010

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of October 2010

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2011

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2011

 
   
 

For review of  Autumn 2011 click on the picture above

 
   
 

For review of  Autumn 2011 click on the picture above

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2012

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2012

 
   
 

For review of  Autumn 2012 click on the picture above

 
   
 

For review of  Autumn 2012 click on the picture above

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2013

 
   
 

Click on picture for review of April 2013

 
   
 

For review of  Autumn 2013 click on the picture above

 
   
 

For review of  Autumn 2013 click on the picture above

 
   
 

Click on picture for Review of Spring 2014

 
   
 

Click on picture for Review of Spring 2014

 
 
 

LAYOUT AND ATTRACTION REVIEW

 
 

   
  TY-BACH by Francis Stapleton. 12mm Gauge 5.5mm Scale  
 

   
  The two Welsh Edwardian ladies were too deep in conversation about crates and stoves to notice Talyllyn Railway 0-4-0WT "Dolgoch" trundle past toward the quarries. The 2' 3" gauge well tank was built by Fletcher Jennings of Whitehaven, Cumberland, in 1865 and is preserved on the Talyllyn Railway of today.  
 

   
  The two Welsh Edwardian ladies were too deep in conversation about crates and stoves to notice Talyllyn Railway 0-4-0WT "Dolgoch" trundle past toward the quarries. The 2' 3" gauge well tank was built by Fletcher Jennings of Whitehaven, Cumberland, in 1865 and is preserved on the Talyllyn Railway of today.  
 

   
  Ty Bach was pure fiction, but assumed to be on high ground about one mile due south of Talyllyn Lake. For Ty Bach to have existed a connecting railway between Abergonolwyn on the Talyllyn Railway and Corris on the Corris Railway would have had to have been built, creating a through line from Towyn to Machynlleth . Above the village of Corris Uchaf ( Upper Corris in English ) a junction would also have to have existed with a branch line running west to Ty Bach. The imaginary branch was built to serve the slate quarries at Glyn Iago and Darren. Both are real quarries, but neither was successful. Glyn Iago was not much more than a trial and is now lost in forestry, while Darren did produce but was unable to transport its undesirable rustic produce to market, relying soley on the packhorse. The quarry was notable however for its hand powered circular saw.

The station would have been some distance from either quarry, Darren being reached by a 2'3" gauge tramway from the station, and having its own locomotive. Glyn Iago would have been served by a 3'6" gauge horse worked tramway, using second hand equipment from Duffryn Nantile.

The name Ty Bach came from the Quarry Manager's house. According to the locals, the unpopular English Quarry Manager wanted to call his cottage The Big House. The Welsh quarrymen weren't having this and insisted that the name had to be in Welsh, and informed him that the translation was Ty Bach. Ty Bach is actually Little House, and usually refers to a specific little house at the bottom of the garden. It was a while before the Manager found tthe true translation - Ty Mawr -but by then the original name had stuck! When the railway arrived, it took its station name from the nearest house.

The track was hand built in an attempt to portray poor quality trackwork. Scenery was plaster on a foam bed, covered in various scenic scatter materials. Rolling stock was mainly kit built with kits from Malcom Savage Models and loco chassis from Mike Chinnery. There were a few adapted vehicles as well as a few scratch built wagons. Most of the buildings were built by Peter Leyland.

 
 

   
  UPTON by David Griffin. EM Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  The business premises of Leonard & Harrington, hop factors - established in 1759 with offices in Sansome Street - stood alongside a row of railwayman's cottages as a backdrop to this beautifully built and painted Midland Railway signal box. To one side was the signalman's motorcycle - probably still a British make - and just beyond the buffer stops was wagon 3 in the fleet of James Taylor & Co, coal and brick merchants of Beckford.  
 

   
  The business premises of Leonard & Harrington, hop factors - established in 1759 with offices in Sansome Street - stood alongside a row of railwayman's cottages as a backdrop to this beautifully built and painted Midland Railway signal box. To one side was the signalman's motorcycle - probably still a British make - and just beyond the buffer stops was wagon 3 of James Taylor & Co, coal and brick merchants of Beckford.  
 

   
  This layout - never before seen at a model railway exhibition - was inspired by the track plan of Upton-on-Severn. It was set in the years immediately following Nationalisation and so allowed the running of stock in liveries - such as block lettering and lion and wheel emblem - representing periods both before and after 1948. Most of the rolling stock was kit built and the trains depicted traffic typical of the area between the years 1935 and closure of the Upton to Malvern line in 1952. However, there is also a Derby lightweight railcar from 1955. After 1952, services from Ashchurch - on the Birmingham to Cheltenham line - were run on the Down line only despite the Up line remaining in situ. However, on this splendidly detailed EM layout both lines are used and future scenic baseboards are planned for each end.  
 

   
  LYNDEFELD by Brian Stenning. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  Although sheep traffic at Lyndefeld was dwindling in the 1960s there was still a large amound of general merchandise to be transhipped from vans to a Scammell Scarab as well as coal and automotive traffic!  
 

   
  Although sheep traffic at Lyndefeld was dwindling in the 1960s there was still a large amound of general merchandise to be transhipped from vans to a Scammell Scarab as well as coal and automotive traffic!  
 

   
  Lyndefeld was an imaginary small market town set somewhere in the mid-south of England near the coast. It was served by a branch off the South Western Main Line that had escaped the Beeching Axe of the early 1960s. The line was originally conceived as a cross country route to join the London & South Western Railway branch to Midhurst. As a consequence the station at Lyndefeld was built as a through station despite the line never progressing further.

The branch generated a moderate train service for the locality with commuter services to and from Brighton and Waterloo as well as connecting with the Western Region at Reading. Enthusiasts excursions were also to be seen and there was also a fair amount of freight, sufficient to warrant he retention of a small locomotive facilty at Lyndefeld despite the dwindling amount of sheep moved by rail.

The layout was designed to demonstrate what can be achieved using mainly proprietary materials and built as a first attempt at an exhibition layout. The baseboards were constructed of 12mm MDF and chipboard on 2" x 1" softwood frames. All trackwork was PECO Streamline on a cork base and ballasted with "granite" chippings. Points are controlled electrically with PECO ppoint motors. The station building, platform, goods and engine sheds, signal box, retaining walls and most of the briges were constructed from Wills kits and materials while Woodland Scenics materials were used for landscaping. Most of the trees on the landscape were constructed from twisted wire. The layout was principally built to fit as an L shape into a spare bedroom 9' 6" x 7' 3" but can also be exhibited in one length of 17' 3" as was the case on this occasion.

 
 

   
  MAIDENS DALE by Shaun Robson. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  One of the later English Electric Class 20 Bo-Bo diesel electrics waits for the "rightaway" with a train of tank wagons under the cast iron Midland Railway footbridge at Maidens Dale. Note the ice cream van on the right!  
 

   
  One of the later English Electric Class 20 Bo-Bo diesel electrics waited for the "rightaway" with a train of tank wagons under the cast iron Midland Railway footbridge at Maidens Dale. Note the ice cream van on the right!
 

   
  Maidens Dale was a fictional location somewhere on the Midland region in the 1960s. The layout was originally an end to end design started in 1986 and was extended over the years to an oval meaxuring 11' x 6' 3". PECO Code 100 track was used throughout with PECO point motors actuated via the electric pencil method and a capacitor discharge unit. The track was split into five sections and the fiddle yard had 16 tracks. The trains ran in turn and were controlled by two hand held AMRs. The steam and diesel stock was mainly ready to run with a few kits and conversions and the piano wire operated signals made from Ratio components. The scenery was made from carved polystyrene and chicken wire over the tunnels, coverd with strips of glued newspaper, then polyfilla painted brown, then scenes glued on. the water feature was made from Bonda clear casting resin with layers of yacht varnish. Most of the buildings were scratch built using Slaters plasticard, many of them copied from photographs of real buildings with detailed illuminated interiors.  
 

   
  MIDDLEWOOD By Les Williams. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  Walking home from a hard day's work, the diesel fitter reflected on the cluttered design of the Derby Type 2  
 

   
  Walking home from a hard day's work, the diesel fitter reflected on the cluttered design of the Derby Type 2  
 

   
  Middlewood was a small motive power depot with a terminus station. The depot shed was scratchbuilt and the station building an old Triang structure. The track was waethered PECO Code 100 and Middlewood can represent any location and Region. Locomotive classes included 03,08,20,24,25,31,37,40,44,46,47,50 and 55.  
 

   
  THOMAS by CHELTENHAM GWR MODELLERS GROUP.4mm Scale 00 Gauge  
 

   
  BILSTON ROAD ENGINE SHED by Peter Cullen. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  Bilston Road Engine Shed united Great Western, Midland and British Standard classes among the architecture and fittings of a typical British steam locomotive depot.  
 

   
  Bilston Road Engine Shed united Great Western, Midland and British Standard classes among the architecture and fittings of a typical British steam locomotive depot.  
 

   
  This layout represented a typical sub shed located somewhere in the industrial West Midlands on the Western Region of British Railways during the mid 1960s. Work weray run down locomotives returned from overnight servicing and simple running repairs during the last years of their working lives. All locomotives were ready to run although most had been weathered by SCRS member Martin Smith using Carrs weathering powders to evoke the period modelled. When not at exhibitions, Bilston Road provides a storage and display facility for locomotives not in use on Peter's main layout.  
 

   
  SHIEL BRIDGE by Steve Newman, Phoenix MRC. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  37 408 "Loch Rannoch" leads a train of empty timber wagons from Shiel Bridge cutting toward Spean Bridge  
 

   
  37 408 "Loch Rannoch" led a train of empty timber wagons from Shiel Bridge cutting toward Spean Bridge  
 

   
  Shiel Bridge is now the terminus of the Fort Augustus Branch that closed in 1947. It survived due to increased timber and paper traffic and movements to the Royal Navy base in the next glen along a short freight only line. Passenger traffic meanwhile justified a three carriage train from Spean Bridge during the summer months. Motive power was used to represent a range of eras within the last 20 years.  
 

   
  CAMPBELL'S YARD by George Lowen. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  In post-1956 black livery former London Brighton & South Coast Railway A1X "Terrier" class 0-6-0T 32678 shunted a seven plank coal wagon from Devon across the cramped Brahms & Lyst yard in North London  
 

   
  In post-1956 black livery former London Brighton & South Coast Railway A1X "Terrier" class 0-6-0T 32678 shunted a seven plank coal wagon from Devon across the cramped Brahms & Lyst yard in North London  
 

   
  Campbell's Yard was built by Nailsea & District Model Railway Club member George to see how a small layout could be structured. The overall measurement is 22" x 8", the scenic section of the layout measuring 16" x 7". Basic shunting consists of taking a wagon out of a siding and replacing it with another. Operation involves 5 wagons: 2 in the hidden sidings and one each in the front sidings. Each wagon is represented by a playing card. The cards are shuffled and dealt out, indicating the location that the wagon should be shunted to. When the wagons have been shunted to their chosen locations the process is repeated. Two sets of rolling stock are used - one representing pre BR days with a Brighton Terrier 0-6-0T and private owner wagons and the other using Class 04 and 08 diesels.  
 

   
  MARCROFT by Mike Briggs & Nick Barnett. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  "Yes, your Holiness, the BRT registered grain hopper with your telephone number on the side is marshalled out the front next to the BP tank wagon and the Presflo."  
 

   
  "Yes, your Holiness, the BRT registered grain hopper with your telephone number on the side is marshalled out the front next to the BP tank wagon and the Presflo."  
 

   
  A last minute replacement for Pete Morris's Drefach Felindre, Marcroft represented the Wagon Works in its home town of Radstock in Somerset. A sister operation to the well known Marcroft Engineering site in Gloucester, the Marcroft Wagon Works in Radstock remained open until 1988 and changed little in appearance over the years. The layout was depicted after the reworking of the site in 1962 when the four road repair shed was extended. At this stage the through line to Frome had been closed but not lifted. All trains into Radstock GWR came from the Bristol direction as seen on the layout. In 1968 severe flood damage to the line at Pensford resulted in the Bristol connection being closed and the line to Frome being reopened.

All of the buildings were scratchbuilt from photographs and all of the stock used was fully detailed and weathered. The works shunters are similar to ones used around Radstock as Marcroft used an agricultural based shunting tractor which proved impossible to build and motorise.

 
 

   
  LOWER PEAK WHARF By John Bruce. 009 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
 

Lower Peak Wharf station's ginger cat sunned itself on top of an oil drum while the train guard awaited the arrival of the tank locomotive to couple up to the empty livestock wagons at the platform.

 
 

   
  Lower Peak Wharf station's ginger cat sunned itself on top of an oil drum while the train guard awaited the arrival of the tank locomotive to couple up to the empty livestock wagons at the platform.  
 

   
  The Lower Peak Wharf line was built for horse traction, taking stone from a quarry to a canal ( both off-scene ) With the arrival of a 2' 3" gauge edge railway, the tramroad was replaced by a new line linking the quarry and its associated Derbyshire village to the rest of the railway network. By the late 1930s however, the quarry had closed but the narrow gauge railway soldiered on with two trains a week to market days in the nearby town.  
 

   
  MICRO by George Lowen. H0 Gauge 3.5mm Scale  
 

   
  Propelled into Micro by a GM diesel, this boxcar finished its transcontinental journey to the Pacific coast  
 

   
  Propelled into Micro by a GM diesel, this boxcar finished its transcontinental journey to the Pacific coast  
 

   
  George Lowen's other layout at the Cheltenham GWR Modeller's Exhibityion of April 2007 represented a short line somewhere along the fruit growing area along the Pacific Coast of America. The Fruit Packer in the small town of Micro owned the line, which only operated in the picking season with second hand locomotives and rolling stock. All the buildings were scratch built from book and magazine pictures and all rail vehicles were fitted with Kaydee couplings for hands-off operations.  
 

   
  GLASLYN JUNCTION by Frederick Lea. TT Gauge 3mm Scale  
 

   
  A 3mm scale Mark 1 brake carriage in carmine and cream met the typography of the 1950s at Glaslyn  
 

   
  A 3mm scale Mark 1 brake carriage in carmine and cream met the typography of the 1950s at Glaslyn  
 

   
  Glaslyn represented the Cambrian Coast line (and branch to Caergwyddno ) somewhere near Porthmadog in the 1950s and 60s. Typical Cambrian wooden trestle bridges crossed the River Glaslyn ( made from Woodland Scenics Realistic Water ) while the baseboards were constructed from plywwod on a softwood framework. A cassette system was used to replace conventional fiddle yards at either end of the layout and the buildings were scratchbuilt from card or DAS modelling clay and then painted with watercolours or acrylics. locomotives and rolling stock were kit built and many can be obtained from the 3mm Society.  
 

   
  MALLINGFORD CENTRAL by Frome Vale Modellers. N Gauge 2mm Scale  
 

   
  A bird's eye view of Mallingford's show-stopping homage to Bristol Temple Meads - made partly from pens!  
 

   
  A bird's eye view of Mallingford's show-stopping homage to Bristol Temple Meads - made partly from pens!  
 

   
  Set in the early 1980s, Mallingford Central represented a terminus station in a fictional large town south of Birmingham close to the boundary between Western and London Midlands of BR and connected to the Birmingham -Bristol main line by a triangular junction near the real life station of Kings Norton. The town was large enough to warrant regular calls by Inter City cross country trains together with locomotive hauled trains on provincial routes and DMU services between Worcester and Birmingham. The depot provided servicing facilities for freight locomotives allocated to Bescot shed, and passenger locomotives laying over from their duties. Operation was based on the 1982 timetable with mainly blue diesels. Buildings were scratch built or modified kits, the track was standard PECO N gauge and the rolling stock mainly by Grafar.  
 
   
 
   
  SULZER GOLD CUP by Alan Drewett. 00 Gauge 4mm Scale  
 

   
  47 579 "JAMES NIGHTALL G.C." in Network South East livery eases past 47 475 in Provincial markings  
 

   
  47 579 "JAMES NIGHTALL G.C." in Network South East livery eased past 47 475 in Provincial markings  
 

   
  Just imagine. It is a March morning in 1990 and all tracks lead to Cheltenham, Heavy double headed trains from the North have little time to unload their eager passengers at Lansdown Station.

To release the main line for other services, the charter stock heads south to the still–extensive sidings at Sharpness. Here the locomotives will run round their Mark I stock, ready to take the punters home after the last of the horses have galloped to a photo finish.

While they are uncoupled and waiting for signal clearance, let us examine the markings on the range of Sulzer powered Class 47 diesel electrics – now so rarely seen in on a privatised Twenty First Century network dominated by foreign built freight locomotives and multiple unit trains. Click on picture for more information

 
 

   
  MODEL BUS FEDERATION by Paul Mellor
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT MODELLERS by David Mellor
4mm Scale
 
 

   
  The Mellor Brothers - Paul and David - continued to delight bus and truck enthusiasts alike, not least because of the attention to detail in the scenery surrounding their vehicles. Brocklecote Bus Station for example now boasts an extremely lifelike branch of Steve Gooch Estate Agents, complete with property data displays and plate glass windows that allow a glimpse of the buses parked beyond. Also of local interest is the white van in the foreground with GLOSCAT markings on the door.  
 

   
  The Mellor Brothers - Paul and David - continued to delight bus and truck enthusiasts alike, not least because of the attention to detail in the scenery surrounding their vehicles. Brocklecote Bus Station for example now boasts an extremely lifelike branch of Steve Gooch Estate Agents, complete with property data displays and plate glass windows that allow a glimpse of the buses parked beyond.

Also of local interest is the white van in the foreground with GLOSCAT markings on the door, closely followed by a Mercedes Actros cabover tractor unit in the colours of Edgwicks, a firm long associated with Tewkesbury. Indeed, an Edwin Edgwick is recorded as a coal dealer at Back of Avon in 1842 while in 1879 Edwin William Edgwick was trading at the Albion Coal Wharf in Tewkesbury. By 1889 48 year old Edwin William Edgwick of Oldbury Road was also trading at the Midland Railway station in Tewkesbury - on the line from Ashchurch to Malvern - and after his death in November 1895 his twenty year old son Edwin Walter Fairfield Edgwick took over the business. Although Edwin William Edgwick had first acquired railway wagons in 1891 the first actual purchase of two new wagons came in June 1900. Lettered E.W.F. EDGWICK and numbered 11 and 12, these were built by the Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company and cost 78/10 each. of these wagon 11 survived until scrapping in 1948.

 
 

   
  Also on individual display were these members of the Gloucester based CM Downton fleet. The brown and cream articulated tractor and trailer combination was also the subject of a recent 1/50 scale die cast model by Corgi while the bright yellow cabover on the right is in a subfleet dedicated to the logistical supply of Petsmart.  
 

   
  Also on individual display were these members of the Gloucester based CM Downton fleet. The brown and cream articulated tractor and trailer combination was also the subject of a recent 1/50 scale die cast model by Corgi while the bright yellow cabover on the right is in a subfleet dedicated to the logistical supply of Petsmart.

Click on either picture to visit The Mellor Brothers own pages on this site

 


  TRAVEL 2000 LTD TRADING AS PROVINCIAL / CONCEPT 2000 / BLACK & WHITE by Andy Peckham. 4mm Scale  
 

   
  Also making a welcome return along with the Mellor Brothers was fellow bus modeller and Model Bus Federation member Andy Peckham. His newly-superdetailed depot diorama was centered around the fictitious firm of Travel 2000 Ltd, trading as both as executive coach provider Provincial Concept 2000 and budget line Black and White. Also in the overall fleet were dedicated school and university PSVs (above) and - nearest the camera below - a Leyland Tiger with the longer version of the Plaxton Paramount body. Carrying the three brown stripes of Provincial livery, this carried the registration AJP1.  
 

   
  Also making a welcome return along with the Mellor Brothers was fellow bus modeller and Model Bus Federation member Andy Peckham. His newly-superdetailed depot diorama was centered around the fictitious firm of Travel 2000 Ltd, trading as quality coach provider Concept 2000 and standard coach provider Black and White. Also in the Provincial division were dedicated school and university PSVs (above) and - nearest the camera below - a Leyland Tiger with the longer version of the Plaxton Paramount body. Carrying the three brown stripes of Provincial livery, this carried the registration AJP1.  
 

   
  images/CLIC_2007_Peckham_Schoolbus.jpg  
 

   
  At the top end of the travel range were these rare Concept 2000 marked Dutch built Bova Futuras with the registrations DP20 and AP49  
 

   
  At the top end of the travel range were these rare Concept 2000 marked Dutch built Bova Futuras with the registrations DP20 and AP49  
 

   
  Some readers will be asking why a skilled modeller should be striving to perfect fictitious markings when most railway and aircraft builders go into rivet-counting detail trying to replicate reality. The answer is that bus modelling also has a function beyond shape and colour recognition that is more akin to wargaming. As further reported on the Model Bus Federation website and in their regular printed Supplements, some bus enthusiasts will use their scale replicas as the basis for hypothetical bus companies. These will bid for and operate routes and be allocated their own blocks of route numbers by Traffic Commissioners, operating to a timetable interlocking with other operators. Such operators also cope with changing conditions inspired by events in the real world.  
 

   
  MODELLING DISPLAYS by Steve Harrod, Harvey Faulkner-Aston, Rob Owst, Andi Dell and Paul "Boris" White  
 

   
  A 4mm Scale model of 37 324 joins a line up of blue liveried classmates with different ends  
 

   
  A 4mm Scale model of 37 324 joins a line up of blue liveried classmates with different ends  
 

   
  Also in attendance were Rural Railways, Robbie Burns of Robbie's Rolling Stock with 4mm and 2mm scale wagons for sale, Stewart Blencowe books and photographs, Cheltenham Model Centre ( Saturday Only ), Castle Trains of Warwick (Sunday only) The Festiniog Railway, and Clive Reid's pre-enjoyed rolling stock.